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Tax Cuts

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NEWS
April 18, 2006
ON THE ISSUE of President Bush's motives for creating the Iraq war, I'm puzzled why no one in "government" has looked at this mammoth issue through the lens of the simultaneous tax cuts for the rich. If a war is truly just, then all are asked to sacrifice. The tax cuts and continuing efforts to make them "permanent" are proof that this whole production is a sham. Mitch Deighan Philadelphia
NEWS
December 2, 2004
IN HIS letter "The snake oil of tax cuts" (Nov. 29), municipal union chief Tom Cronin offers a skewed view of our city's fiscal condition, blaming pending layoffs on Philadelphia's desperately needed tax-reduction program. But spending for the city administration's pet projects - not tax cuts - is forcing the current municipal belt tightening. In recent years, the city exhausted a $300 million surplus with hundreds of millions of dollars of new spending for the Eagles stadium and Phillies ballpark, for blight removal programs, for police overtime, for the school takeover deal and for the increased costs of raises for the city's union workforce.
NEWS
May 11, 2008
After decades of jacking up taxes in Philadelphia, this is no time to undo the important steps taken by former Mayors Edward G. Rendell and John F. Street in chipping away at the onerous wage and business taxes. But now that the economy is faltering, there is some talk at City Hall of halting the tax cuts. That's the worst message Mayor Nutter and City Council could send to workers, businesses and residents. Ending the meager wage- and business-tax cuts already on the books - as well as failing to push ahead with the business cuts proposed by the mayor - would signal that the city is headed in the wrong direction.
NEWS
March 6, 2001
Please explain a rather mysterious idea in your editorial "Bush's good week" (March 1) that "Clinton's careful budgets. . .reduced the federal deficit created by Reagan's tax cuts. " The budget deficits of the Reagan years were not caused by tax cuts. As tax revenues went up - not down - after Reagan's tax cuts, the cuts couldn't have caused the deficits, could they? CAMERON KELLEY, Philadelphia SAT and minorities Daniel Saras (letter, Feb. 28) says the SATs should deny minorities spots that can go to more deserving students.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The White House, showing signs of indecision over how to stimulate the economy, backed away yesterday from recommending new tax cuts and raised the possibility that it may not propose an economic recovery plan. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater indicated that President Bush wanted to assess new economic data before deciding on a course of action, despite increasing calls on Capitol Hill from Republicans and Democrats for immediate steps to jump-start the nation's economy. The caution contrasts with White House statements earlier in the week suggesting that an economic recovery plan could be unveiled by week's end. The mixed signals reflect disagreement within the administration over economic policy, with some officials pushing for tax cuts and others contending that the economy is recovering from the recession on its own. Yesterday, Vice President Quayle predicted that economic statistics due out next week would show the economy getting better, and he urged Americans to go out and buy new automobiles and other goods.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Maybe it was a Freudian slip. Or maybe it was one of those few times when a politician says what he really thinks. Rep. Bill Richardson (D., N.M.), explaining his party's middle-class tax cut plan to the news media recently, lapsed into plain English: It's "a political document," he said. "Long-term economic policy is needed in this country," Richardson said. "But the fact that we have an election supersedes that. " It may be crass politics and bad economic policy.
NEWS
May 18, 2003 | By James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In the United States, if you're wealthy or a land-rich farmer and you want your heirs to avoid paying taxes on your estate, plan to die in 2010 - not before, and certainly not after. That's the only year when you can avoid estate taxes entirely, according to the 2001 tax-cut law in a provision once derided by Sen. Rick Santorum (R., Pa.) as "pro-suicide. " It is a bit of legislative gimmickry designed to squeeze a big tax cut into a small budget box. Now, as Congress fashions a new 10-year tax-reduction plan, it's using the same kind of legerdemain.
NEWS
July 30, 1999 | By Larry Eichel
There was something about the Senate's debate on cutting taxes this week that was far more palatable than what transpired in the House a week earlier. In the Senate, amid long hours of highly political rhetoric, there were moments of bipartisanship. And there were signs, albeit faint, that political posturing might give way to agreement before year's end. The difference between the House and Senate was embodied in the labels attached to their respective plans of how to cut taxes by $792 billion over the next 10 years.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Steven Thomma, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The Republican Party is catching flat-tax fever, setting up an election-year fight with Democrats over whether wealthier Americans should pay more taxes or get tax cuts. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney became the latest to punch the tax button Wednesday, telling a Virginia audience that he will soon update his economic proposal to spell out how to flatten the tax code. A day earlier, rival Rick Perry proposed an optional flat 20 percent tax on income.
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NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - New Jersey's gas tax isn't going up - at least for the holiday weekend. The Senate did not hold a vote Thursday on legislation to raise the tax to replenish the state's fund for roads and bridges, spurning a call by Gov. Christie to resolve the crisis before the fiscal year ended Thursday. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) said he didn't believe there was enough support in his chamber to advance legislation, backed by Christie, that the Assembly passed this week.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - New Jersey lawmakers left the Statehouse on Monday without a deal to replenish the state's depleted fund for roads and bridges, but are negotiating a possible gas tax hike in exchange for a reduction in the sales tax. Throughout a marathon legislative session, being held before the fiscal year ends Thursday, top lawmakers dashed in and out of meetings with Gov. Christie, who seemed intent on crushing any attempt by lawmakers to override his...
BUSINESS
January 4, 2016
This holiday season, Congress decided, once again, that it is really important to give. The budget agreement passed in mid-December was an example of the good old-fashioned pork-trading typical of past Congresses - at least until political purity and party warfare became the preferred form of non-governing. While going back to the future did prevent another government shutdown, it is doubtful the old strategy amounts to responsible budgeting policy. The bipartisan tax-and- spending Christmas tree has too many special deals under it to list in one, two or maybe even three of these columns.
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie said Monday that he would not consider raising the state's tax on gasoline unless lawmakers pared back other levies, though he didn't endorse a specific plan. Christie's transportation commissioner has said the state will run out of money for road, bridge, and rail projects in July. "I will consider any option that's presented to me as long as those options include tax fairness for the people of New Jersey," Christie said Monday morning at a breakfast in Morris County hosted by the Commerce and Industry Association of New Jersey.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
MANCHESTER, N.H. - Gov. Christie attacked President Obama's economic record while calling for lower income and corporate tax rates during a speech Tuesday, the latest installment in a push to gain presidential ground in the first-in-the-nation primary state. Christie, who also called for a less restrictive approach to government regulation and a national energy strategy that would include completion of the Keystone XL pipeline, said the Democratic president's "high-tax, heavy-regulation" policies were responsible for a slow economic recovery that has taken a particular toll on the middle class.
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been a mantra of American business for years - lower the tax rate on multinational corporations to boost their competitive edge and spur the economy in the United States. But a University of Pennsylvania law professor argues in a new study that cutting taxes for multinationals might not achieve the desired result. Professor Chris William Sanchirico says the reason has relatively little to do with whether wealthy Americans and U.S. companies spend additional profit reaped from U.S. tax cuts.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Republicans and Democrats in New Jersey are again sparring over tax cuts as Gov. Christie prepares to enter his second term with national scrutiny surrounding his expected presidential bid. At a panel discussion Tuesday hosted by the New Jersey Business and Industry Association, top lawmakers split along party lines on the prospect of a tax cut for New Jerseyans. Reducing taxes, either through an income-tax cut or a credit tied to property tax bills, "begins to send a message across the state and across the nation that we're heading in another direction," said Assembly Minority Leader Jon Bramnick (R., Union)
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA When it comes to postrecession recovery, Philadelphia is in the middle of the pack of large cities, according to a Pew Charitable Trusts report released Monday. While the city was almost near full recovery in 2011 - the last full year of data used for the report - Pew researchers warned that Philadelphia's unfunded pension and retiree health benefits posed great threats to the city's available revenue in years to come. The report, "America's Big Cities in Volatile Times," was based on data from 2007 through 2011 and looked at how the country's 30 most populous cities fared in the aftermath of the recession, which ended in June 2009.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
UNION CITY, N.J. - Fresh off a 22-point reelection victory in a Democratic state, Gov. Christie on Wednesday left wide open the possibility of pursuing the presidency and said he didn't mind if reporters kept asking him about running. "It's flattering and I have no problem with it, but I want to be clear about this: I have a job to do; I was reelected to do a job," Christie said. "If the time comes where I change my mind and I decide I want to do something else, I'll tell the people of New Jersey I want to do something else," he said.
NEWS
July 27, 2013
By Carter Eskew Republicans are greeting President Obama's summer push on the economy with derision. To House Speaker John Boehner and others, the president seems like an aging rock star whose recycled hits became stale years ago. Yet he still tours, playing to smaller and smaller arenas. While the president is unlikely to be celebrated for his economic record, his presidency marks the end of Republican orthodoxy on economic matters dating to the late 1970s. The Republican frame for 40 years has been that Democrats are the party of tax, spend, and regulation, while Republicans are the party of tax cuts, austerity, and deregulation.
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