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Tax Exemption

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NEWS
November 19, 1992 | By Lyn A.E. McCafferty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Commonwealth Court has ruled that a home for unwed mothers in Darby Borough, Delaware County, is not tax exempt. The ruling, handed down Tuesday by Judge Rochelle S. Friedman, reversed an earlier Delaware County Court decision allowing the Delaware County Pro-Life Coalition to claim tax-exempt status for the former Catholic convent renovated into a home for pregnant women. In July 1988, the Delaware County Pro-Life Coalition entered into a five- year lease agreement with the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and Blessed Virgin Mary Church for the church's land and a former convent building in Darby Borough.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | By Christine M. Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
The Chester County Tax Assessment Board is considering an appeal for tax exemption by a nonprofit Christian housing ministry that wants to build low- income housing on its property in South Coatesville. During a 30-minute hearing on Thursday, Habitat for Humanity president Henry Fisher asked board members to grant a one-year exemption for three vacant parcels of land. He said his group intends to use privately donated funds and primarily volunteer labor to construct houses for low-income families.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
The IRS has turned down the long-running effort by the Democratic convention's Philadelphia host committee to win a tax exemption. Word of the decision, a setback for efforts to raise the last of the $60 million needed to help pay for the July 25 to 28 convention, came Friday from its adviser, David L. Cohen. When the decision came - and why - is less clear. Cohen would say only that the IRS "recently" turned down the application for tax-exempt status under section 501(c)3 of the tax code, which the committee had sought for more than a year.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
The Tredyffrin/Easttown School District has filed suit in Chester County Court seeking to rescind the tax-exempt status of Valley Forge Military Academy and Junior College. In a petition filed Jan. 19, the school board said the tax exemption should be revoked because "the academy has not shown that it is founded and/or maintained by private or public charity. " E. Mark Mullineaux, an attorney for the school district, said the academy did not meet all the legal criteria to be considered a "purely public charity.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | By Jennifer Lin and Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Internal Revenue Service revoked the tax-exempt status of the Philadephia Housing Authority's development nonprofit - a move that the housing agency's director earlier said would be "catastrophic. " The $66-million nonprofit guides all development work for the housing agency and has steered the construction of thousands of units of affordable housing in the past decade. The loss of nonprofit status means the development corporation will have to begin paying taxes on income and re-apply for tax exemption.
NEWS
June 28, 1995 | By Richard Berkowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Although official discussions on next year's budget are not scheduled to begin until the end of October, the battle lines are already starting to form. And not surprisingly, the focus is on taxes. Councilwoman Jane Faust said at Monday night's council meeting that it was "the responsibility" of the council to exempt the elderly and disabled from paying the township's head tax. The annual $10 tax, paid by every resident of Bensalem over age 18, was enacted in 1991 to erase part of a $1.86 million deficit.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
As owner of Chapin Medical Co. in Anaheim, Calif., Mark Johnson does considerable business with the American Red Cross. For one thing, his company serves as a national distributor of Red Cross plasma medicines, delivering them to hospitals wherever the Red Cross has contracts. Chapin Medical and a number of other national distributors are paid a fee for these services. But Johnson also buys plasma medicines from the Red Cross outright, marks them up and sells them to hospitals on his own. "If I call up a hospital that has no relationship with Red Cross, then I'll sell at any price I can get," Johnson said.
NEWS
October 18, 1987 | By Eddie Olsen and Connie Perlin, Special to The Inquirer
For the first time in 43 years, Boy Scout Troop 55 of Berlin Borough will be required to pay taxes on 10.8 acres of undeveloped land that it owns and uses as a camp site, according to Christine Wahl, the borough's tax assessor. The property, known as Camp Stanton, is located at 130 Crest Ave., a residential section of Berlin Borough, and has an estimated market value of more than $500,000, according to one area Realtor. The land had not been taxed until now because it apparently was overlooked by borough officials, including herself, Wahl said.
NEWS
June 10, 2011 | By Jennifer Lin and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
A nonprofit development affiliate of the Philadelphia Housing Authority that quietly amassed $66 million in assets during the tenure of ousted director Carl R. Greene was stripped of its tax-exempt status Thursday by the Internal Revenue Service. Michael P. Kelly, the authority's administrator, had said the impact could be "catastrophic" after The Inquirer reported on May 29 that the nonprofit's tax status was in jeopardy because it had failed to file required annual IRS reports known as Form 990s since 2006.
NEWS
June 12, 1991 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Special to The Inquirer
Plans for the state-subsidized reconstruction of the downtown Camden waterfront hit a temporary snag yesterday over how much a developers' consortium must pay the city for exempting a new GE factory and office complex from school and county taxes. City Council had planned to act tomorrow on a proposal for the city to reap annual payments of 2 percent of the construction costs of a 350,000-square- foot office building and a 225,000-square-foot factory. The structures would replace existing GE and Campbell Soup plants between Market and Federal Streets along the Delaware River.
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NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
The IRS has turned down the long-running effort by the Democratic convention's Philadelphia host committee to win a tax exemption. Word of the decision, a setback for efforts to raise the last of the $60 million needed to help pay for the July 25 to 28 convention, came Friday from its adviser, David L. Cohen. When the decision came - and why - is less clear. Cohen would say only that the IRS "recently" turned down the application for tax-exempt status under section 501(c)3 of the tax code, which the committee had sought for more than a year.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie on Monday suggested that he wasn't ready to support a proposal to revise New Jersey tax policy, including a hefty gas tax hike and phaseout of a levy on estates of the deceased. His remarks came as a coalition of Democratic and Republican lawmakers - backed by organized labor, business, and other groups - heralded the plan as game-changing legislation that would fund critical investments in roads and bridges while also saving taxpayers about $1 billion annually through other policy changes.
NEWS
March 23, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
The local committee established to raise funds for the Democratic National Convention is in a jam with the IRS. The Philadelphia 2016 Host Committee filed a public charity application last year, but it has been put on hold pending some "technical questions," Anna Adams-Sarthou, DNC host committee spokeswoman, said Monday. She declined to elaborate. The New York Post first reported the problem Monday. The committee's pending status could be an issue for donors who gave big checks to the committee last year and are now filing their taxes.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie on Wednesday signed into law legislation that cuts sales and use taxes on purchases of recreational boats by 50 percent, a move supporters said would spur economic growth. The law also sets a $20,000 cap on sales tax imposed on such purchases, and provides a 30-day grace period during which a tax will not be levied on the use of such boats in the state. About 150,000 recreational vessels are registered in New Jersey, down by 100,000 over the past 15 years, according to the state's Marine Trades Association.
NEWS
November 24, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
After years of appeals and court battles - including a civil-rights suit - the Delaware County tax board has ruled that a church in tiny Trainer Borough will not have to pay real estate levies. The Board of Assessment found Monday that two parcels in the Church of the Overcomer complex that carried nearly $10,000 in annual tax bills qualified for exemptions, effective Jan. 1. "I've spent a decade of my life fighting for this cause," said Pastor Keith Collins, adding that the dispute "should never have happened.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
THERE'S A tax break for struggling homeowners that Congress shouldn't have let expire just before the new year. If not extended, some people selling their homes could get big tax bills. As the housing crisis in the middle of the last decade drove people into foreclosure, many borrowers were not aware that forgiven debt, including on mortgages, is considered income. In 2007, Congress passed the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act to help people who were down on their luck financially because of the loss of their homes.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's universities, which are largely exempt from paying property taxes, are fighting back against the idea that they should make payments to the city to help with its school funding crisis and other needs. A universities-commissioned report to be released Thursday says 12 of the city's universities collectively produce an economic impact of $10.9 billion. That includes employing 84,000 people and generating $211 million in city tax revenues, according to the report by Econsult Solutions, a Philadelphia-based economic consulting firm.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
WITNESS intimidation. Private investigators. Testimony from exotic dancers. Bloody feet. Drop in on a meeting of the Tax Review Board these days and you might think a high-profile murder case is being heard. What's really on trial? Lap dances. Yesterday, the five-member city board held its second of at least four hearings on a case brought by the owners of Philly clubs Cheerleaders, Delilah's and Club Risque. The strip joints are appealing a recent city audit that billed them a combined $1.6 million in back taxes and penalties by applying the city amusement tax, 5 percent on an "admission fee," to the cost of lap dances.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2013 | By Mark Jewell, Associated Press
Municipal bonds continue to provide a reliable refuge from stock-market volatility and a steady source of tax-free income. An index of muni bond mutual funds has recently been yielding about 2.18 percent. While that's nothing to brag about, it's a substantially higher yield than the roughly 2 percent that 10-year Treasury bonds offer, without factoring in the tax-exempt advantage that munis offer. But for all of munis' stability, investors have clearly been scared the last several weeks.
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