CollectionsTax Fraud
IN THE NEWS

Tax Fraud

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The retired theater manager - an elfin, white-haired man who has celebrated 73 birthdays and has assets exceeding $900,000 - uttered his soliloquy at center stage yesterday, but not at a venue of his choice. Alexis "Lex" Carlin's audience was a federal judge, who was about to place Carlin on two years probation, with a $10,000 fine, for admitted tax fraud. His crime: avoiding income taxes for years on "ice," a euphemism that show-business folks use to refer to kickbacks, in his case, from area ticket brokers who paid for choice seats for desirable shows.
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Federal authorities yesterday announced criminal charges against 15 reputed area tax cheats who allegedly failed to report a total of $6 million in income, dodging payment of $1.5 million in taxes. The announcement was U.S. Attorney Michael R. Stiles' way of reminding everyone that this year's tax filing deadline is April 17, just 10 days away. The biggest case money-wise involved real estate developers John A. "Jack" Gambone, 62, of Malvern, Chester County, and his brother Anthony, 67, of Norristown, Montgomery County, owners of the Gambone Organization.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A partner in a Center City accounting firm was convicted yesterday of helping former city Democratic Party Treasurer James Gillin and his brother, Robert, evade federal income taxes, in part by bribing a corrupt Internal Revenue Service agent. The U.S. District Court jury convicted the accountant, Stephen A. Cohen, 53, a partner in the firm of Morris J. Cohen and Co., of conspiracy to impede the collection of taxes and aiding in the preparation of false tax returns. The Gillin brothers were granted immunity from prosecution in exchange for their testimony against Cohen, whose firm has more than 300 clients and has done work for the city Parking Authority, the Democratic City Committee and former Mayor William J. Green.
LIVING
April 14, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story includes information from the Associated Press, Reuters, the Los Angeles Times, the New York Daily News, the New York Post, the Wasghington Post and USA Today
Palimony lawyer Marvin Mitchelson was sentenced Monday to 2 1/2 years in jail for tax fraud and ordered by a federal judge in Los Angeles to pay more than $2 mil in back taxes plus interest. Mitchelson, 64, broke down before the judge, who called the attorney a man who had "literally ruined himself. " Said the tearful, stooped Mitchelson: "This is the second-saddest day of my life. My mother's death was the first. " He was accused of hiding income between 1983 and 1986 in order to feed his high lifestyle - a Hollywood mansion with expensive furnishings, jewelry and a stable of cars that included two Rolls-Royces.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Defense attorneys closed their case after presenting testimony from only one witness yesterday in the tax-fraud trial of the owners of a Montgomery County construction and development firm. Lawyers representing Anthony and John Gambone Sr., co-owners of Gambone Bros. Organization Inc., concluded their case after the testimony of an accountant and former Internal Revenue Service agent who examined the corporate taxes of the company and the personal returns of the two Gambone brothers.
NEWS
January 19, 2013
A Philadelphia police officer and his brother have been charged in a tax-fraud conspiracy, U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger said Friday. Jose Tirado, 38, assigned to the 25th District, was arrested Friday morning. From 2008 to 2010, Tirado prepared and filed nearly $508,000 in false claims for tax refunds, prosecutors said. Tirado faces a maximum 80 years in prison, more than $400,000 in restitution, and a maximum $3.75 million fine. His brother Victor Tirado, 36, faces a maximum 25 years in prison, a fine of up to $1,000, and more than $400,000 in restitution.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
Federal prosecutors in Philadelphia charged the owner of a bankrupt chain of shoe stores in Pennsylvania and New Jersey with tax fraud. Uri Jacobson, 41, of Philadelphia, allegedly paid employees of Bare Feet Shoes under the table between 2003 and 2009, causing a federal tax loss of $596,628, and underreported his own income for several years, according to the indictment. Certain Bare Feet Shoes entities filed for bankruptcy protection in December. Sales at the stores included in the bankruptcy fell to $5.9 million in 11 months of 2011 from $7.6 million in 2010, according to a court documents.
NEWS
July 28, 2012
Eight people from Pennsylvania and New Jersey were indicted this week on charges of taking part in a tax-fraud conspiracy aiming to steal more than $3 million, federal authorities announced Friday. The indictment identified Michael Akers, 57, of Philadelphia and Cherry Hill, as the ringleader. Others charged were Raymond Holmes, 56, of Philadelphia; Wendell Cisco, 38, of York, Pa., and Suwanee, Ga.; William Fisher, 55, of Philadelphia; Lynell Matthews, 23, and Latoya Matthews, 27, both of Whitesboro, N.J.; Maria Latorre, 28, of York; and Jalon Hopewell, 27, of Philadelphia.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 23, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Danon tried to warn Vanguard Group it was illegally underpaying its income taxes while he was a tax lawyer for the company from 2008 to 2013 and was punished in return, according to an affidavit filed in his whistleblower lawsuit last week. Danon, of Wayne, contends that after trying to "silence" him, Vanguard fired him "in retaliation for my persistent vocal questioning. " He said he sued only after Vanguard officials refused to act on what he termed "clear violations of law. " Danon said Vanguard, based in Malvern and holding $3 trillion in assets, was "intentionally engaged in unlawful conduct," in court papers meant to answer Vanguard's efforts to discredit him and stop his complaint from advancing in New York Superior Court.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
A South Philadelphia labor contractor has pleaded guilty to illegally transporting undocumented workers and failing to pay employment and income taxes. Kim Meas, 60, admitted using 14 shell companies to create the illusion that the workers from his firm were instead employed by the shells. By doing that, prosecutors said, Meas hoped to make the shell firms appear to be responsible for paying taxes, but the shells never paid. Meas ran LS Services Inc., which operated from a variety of addresses in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia tax preparer pleaded guilty Monday to multiple counts of tax fraud after falsifying hundreds of clients' returns. Edward J. Rorie, 50, doctored 968 returns between 2009 and 2011, seeking inflated refunds totaling $3.85 million, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office. The returns claimed miscellaneous tax credits and fictitious expenses the filers were not entitled to receive, netting more than $100,000 in losses for the IRS. The credits Rorie fraudulently claimed included the First Time Home Buyer Tax Credit, the Hope Tax Credit, the Earned Income Tax Credit, education credits, child care credits, and the Recovery Act's Additional Child Care Credit.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Things just got real for the Real Housewives. As you may have heard, Joe Giudice and his wife, Teresa, who is one of the Real Housewives of New Jersey on Bravo, are going to jail for bankruptcy fraud. I'm going to miss Teresa, whose lack of anger management was a thing of beauty. She famously turned over a table in anger, and I don't know a single woman in the world who hasn't dreamed of doing that, or at least being the kind of woman who would do that, on impulse. By the way, when she flipped the table, she yelled "prostitution whore," which is a great thing to yell at any time.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A DARBY tax preparer has been charged with stealing the identities of foster children to falsely use their information on tax returns for his own benefit, according to an indictment unsealed yesterday. Momolu Sirleaf, 34, of Wycombe Avenue, owned and operated I.E.S. Tax Services, of Darby. According to the indictment: Sirleaf obtained the names and Social Security numbers of kids in the foster-care system. He used their information to falsely add them as dependents on some of his clients' returns "to generate fraudulent refunds, some in excess of $8,000.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
I'M RESPONDING to the article written by Diana David. I'm a first generation Indian-American who decided to get an arranged marriage, and I feel it was the best decision of my life. I know plenty of other first-generation Indian-Americans who decided to get an arranged marriage who are living a good life. The problem with this article is that most Americans don't understand arranged marriage and think it's forced on you by your parents. People ask me questions like, "How can you marry someone you never met?"
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville doctor has been charged with federal tax fraud for allegedly pocketing millions he earned from online prescription sales but never reported as income. In an indictment unsealed Thursday, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia said Elias Karkalas earned about $2.5 million from prescriptions to patients he never met or examined. Karkalas, 64, a primary-care doctor, operates Upper Merion Family Practice in King of Prussia. No attorney was listed for his case, and calls to his practice were not returned Thursday.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
A STATE PRISON guard now is jailed after police arrested him in a tax-fraud scheme that allegedly netted him and his four accomplices thousands of dollars. Kenneth Davidson, 38, a corrections officer at the State Correctional Institution at Graterford, allegedly headed the scam, according to the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office. Davidson worked a part-time, seasonal job at H&R Block and used his position there - unknown to his bosses - to file fraudulent tax returns and get refunds worth thousands, according to the D.A.'s office.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Will Englund, Washington Post
MOSCOW - A Russian court wrapped up the trial of a dead man Thursday, finding whistle-blower Sergei Magnitsky guilty of fraud but waiving a sentence on the grounds that his life ended while he was imprisoned. Magnitsky was a lawyer who unearthed a $230 million fraud by police and tax officials, but he was arrested and charged with perpetrating the fraud himself. He died in a Moscow prison in 2009, apparently after a severe beating. Outrage over his case inspired a U.S. law placing financial and visa sanctions on corrupt Russian officials, which in turn led to a Russian law banning American adoptions of Russian children.
NEWS
June 12, 2013 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former IRS worker who bilked more than $1.7 million in bogus refunds from the agency was sentenced to 19 years in prison Tuesday by a judge who said he had rarely encountered such corruption or a defendant who had so much to lose yet seemed so unapologetic. U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell said he wanted to consider what lawyers in the case cryptically called a "tragic" and "heartbreaking" family situation for Patricia Fountain, a Philadelphia resident with four children. But Dalzell said he was struck by the arrogance of Fountain's crime, her lies at trial, and her unwillingness to show remorse.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|