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Tax Fraud

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NEWS
August 8, 1997 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The retired theater manager - an elfin, white-haired man who has celebrated 73 birthdays and has assets exceeding $900,000 - uttered his soliloquy at center stage yesterday, but not at a venue of his choice. Alexis "Lex" Carlin's audience was a federal judge, who was about to place Carlin on two years probation, with a $10,000 fine, for admitted tax fraud. His crime: avoiding income taxes for years on "ice," a euphemism that show-business folks use to refer to kickbacks, in his case, from area ticket brokers who paid for choice seats for desirable shows.
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Federal authorities yesterday announced criminal charges against 15 reputed area tax cheats who allegedly failed to report a total of $6 million in income, dodging payment of $1.5 million in taxes. The announcement was U.S. Attorney Michael R. Stiles' way of reminding everyone that this year's tax filing deadline is April 17, just 10 days away. The biggest case money-wise involved real estate developers John A. "Jack" Gambone, 62, of Malvern, Chester County, and his brother Anthony, 67, of Norristown, Montgomery County, owners of the Gambone Organization.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A partner in a Center City accounting firm was convicted yesterday of helping former city Democratic Party Treasurer James Gillin and his brother, Robert, evade federal income taxes, in part by bribing a corrupt Internal Revenue Service agent. The U.S. District Court jury convicted the accountant, Stephen A. Cohen, 53, a partner in the firm of Morris J. Cohen and Co., of conspiracy to impede the collection of taxes and aiding in the preparation of false tax returns. The Gillin brothers were granted immunity from prosecution in exchange for their testimony against Cohen, whose firm has more than 300 clients and has done work for the city Parking Authority, the Democratic City Committee and former Mayor William J. Green.
LIVING
April 14, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story includes information from the Associated Press, Reuters, the Los Angeles Times, the New York Daily News, the New York Post, the Wasghington Post and USA Today
Palimony lawyer Marvin Mitchelson was sentenced Monday to 2 1/2 years in jail for tax fraud and ordered by a federal judge in Los Angeles to pay more than $2 mil in back taxes plus interest. Mitchelson, 64, broke down before the judge, who called the attorney a man who had "literally ruined himself. " Said the tearful, stooped Mitchelson: "This is the second-saddest day of my life. My mother's death was the first. " He was accused of hiding income between 1983 and 1986 in order to feed his high lifestyle - a Hollywood mansion with expensive furnishings, jewelry and a stable of cars that included two Rolls-Royces.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Defense attorneys closed their case after presenting testimony from only one witness yesterday in the tax-fraud trial of the owners of a Montgomery County construction and development firm. Lawyers representing Anthony and John Gambone Sr., co-owners of Gambone Bros. Organization Inc., concluded their case after the testimony of an accountant and former Internal Revenue Service agent who examined the corporate taxes of the company and the personal returns of the two Gambone brothers.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2016
Criminals plan for tax season, just as their victims do. Gregory Floyd is assistant special agent in charge of the IRS Criminal Investigations Division office in Philadelphia, which does the nitty-gritty work of investigating tax-related crimes. "Tax fraud due to identity theft is one of our biggest concerns," Floyd said. IRS Criminal Investigations also has worked with other federal agencies on cases such as the indictment of Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr. and the upcoming trial of Nova Bank executive Barry Bekkedam.
NEWS
January 20, 2013
A Philadelphia police officer and his brother have been charged in a tax-fraud conspiracy, U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger said Friday. Jose Tirado, 38, assigned to the 25th District, was arrested Friday morning. From 2008 to 2010, Tirado prepared and filed nearly $508,000 in false claims for tax refunds, prosecutors said. Tirado faces a maximum 80 years in prison, more than $400,000 in restitution, and a maximum $3.75 million fine. His brother Victor Tirado, 36, faces a maximum 25 years in prison, a fine of up to $1,000, and more than $400,000 in restitution.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
Federal prosecutors in Philadelphia charged the owner of a bankrupt chain of shoe stores in Pennsylvania and New Jersey with tax fraud. Uri Jacobson, 41, of Philadelphia, allegedly paid employees of Bare Feet Shoes under the table between 2003 and 2009, causing a federal tax loss of $596,628, and underreported his own income for several years, according to the indictment. Certain Bare Feet Shoes entities filed for bankruptcy protection in December. Sales at the stores included in the bankruptcy fell to $5.9 million in 11 months of 2011 from $7.6 million in 2010, according to a court documents.
NEWS
July 28, 2012
Eight people from Pennsylvania and New Jersey were indicted this week on charges of taking part in a tax-fraud conspiracy aiming to steal more than $3 million, federal authorities announced Friday. The indictment identified Michael Akers, 57, of Philadelphia and Cherry Hill, as the ringleader. Others charged were Raymond Holmes, 56, of Philadelphia; Wendell Cisco, 38, of York, Pa., and Suwanee, Ga.; William Fisher, 55, of Philadelphia; Lynell Matthews, 23, and Latoya Matthews, 27, both of Whitesboro, N.J.; Maria Latorre, 28, of York; and Jalon Hopewell, 27, of Philadelphia.
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NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Facing sentencing Wednesday on federal tax fraud charges, former Traffic Court Judge Michael J. Sullivan offered an unusual argument to the court: Come on, really? Yes, the judge had paid most of the staff at his family bar in South Philadelphia under the table in cash, his lawyer said. And yes, he pleaded guilty last year to failing to report $48,089 in payroll taxes over 11 years. But in a city burdened by violent crime and serious public corruption, defense attorney Henry Hockeimer asked, don't federal authorities have anything better to investigate than a neighborhood bar where employees never made more than $30 to $40 a shift?
BUSINESS
February 17, 2016
Criminals plan for tax season, just as their victims do. Gregory Floyd is assistant special agent in charge of the IRS Criminal Investigations Division office in Philadelphia, which does the nitty-gritty work of investigating tax-related crimes. "Tax fraud due to identity theft is one of our biggest concerns," Floyd said. IRS Criminal Investigations also has worked with other federal agencies on cases such as the indictment of Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr. and the upcoming trial of Nova Bank executive Barry Bekkedam.
NEWS
February 13, 2016
A health technician at the Veteran's Affairs hospital in Coatesville was arrested Thursday and charged with multiple counts of tax fraud and theft. Federal prosecutors say Martin W. Kennedy, 68, prepared inflated tax returns for several of his coworkers and friends between 2010 and 2013, bilking the government out of nearly $250,000 in inflated deductions. According to an indictment filed Tuesday, Kennedy also scammed some of his clients by diverting portions of their refund checks totaling $9,000 over four years to his own bank account without their knowledge.
NEWS
February 7, 2016
Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr. is appealing his conviction last year on bank and tax fraud charges. The decision, announced Friday in a one-sentence filing in federal court, comes three days after a judge sentenced Fattah to five years in prison and ordered him immediately taken into custody. In November, a federal jury found that Fattah, the 33-year-old son of U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.), had cheated banks, clients of his many businesses and the Philadelphia School District out of a total of $1.1 million over several years.
NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
Before being sentenced Tuesday to five years in prison and ordered to pay more than $1 million restitution to the clients and banks he defrauded, Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr. told the court that the government had gotten it wrong. That argument clearly went nowhere. U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III ordered that the congressman's son be immediately taken into custody. He was hauled away while his father, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.), his mother, and a sister sat in the gallery.
NEWS
January 12, 2016
NORTH KOREA American said to be held on spy charge North Korea claims it is holding a naturalized U.S. citizen on suspicion of spying for South Korea, CNN reported Monday. If confirmed, the man would be one of several Americans detained in recent years by the reclusive communist state. North Korean authorities allowed a CNN reporter to interview the purported American detainee, identified as Kim Dong-chul, 62, at a hotel in the capital, Pyongyang. Kim told the network that he lived in Fairfax, Va., but moved in 2001 to the Chinese city of Yanji, near North Korea.
NEWS
December 25, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Court: Go back to Madonna Madonna was understandably upset when her 15-year-old son told her that he refused to leave his dad's house in Britain to join her for the holidays in New York. Rocco Ritchie has been staying with Madge's ex-hub, British filmmaker Guy Ritchie , across the Atlantic. He doesn't want to fly over, Ritchie's attorney has said. What's a mother to do? Some would shout, cry, or plead. Madge, 57, went to court. The "Like a Virgin" singer has won a court order compelling Rocco to return to his ma's home - by force if necessary.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Earlier this year, Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr. sued the U.S. Justice Department, claiming it was attempting to prosecute him on bank and tax fraud charges for statements that should be protected by the First Amendment. Now, a federal judge has tossed that lawsuit, in part because the typically loquacious son of U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah failed to speak up to defend it. In an order filed last week, U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III dismissed the suit because Fattah, 32, failed to meet a court deadline to respond to government arguments that his claims were meritless and, by now, moot.
NEWS
December 5, 2015 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Traffic Court Judge Michael J. Sullivan pleaded guilty Thursday to a misdemeanor charge that he cheated on payroll taxes at his South Philadelphia bar. U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno, who presided at the hearing, in October refused to accept Sullivan's plea until he had more time to review the case. Sullivan, 51, was accused of paying most of his staff at his Fireside Tavern on South Marshall Street under the table for seven years. He allegedly failed to pay $48,000 in taxes.
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr. was convicted Thursday on bank- and tax-fraud charges, a significant setback in his family's ongoing legal fight with federal authorities. It took a jury of eight men and four women a day and a half to affirm prosecutors' depiction of Fattah as a con artist who cheated banks, his own clients, and taxpayers out of thousands of dollars so he could outfit himself in luxury and project the image of a successful businessman on the rise. But if the verdict caused the slightest crack in his seemingly unrelenting confidence, the 32-year-old son of U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.)
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