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Tax Fraud

NEWS
November 28, 1991 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owners of a defunct Langhorne boat sales business have been arrested on charges of failing to remit $740,000 in sales taxes to the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue. Donald J. Mueller, 60, and his wife, Judith, 48, who formerly operated Starboard Marine Inc. and Pleasure Marine Sales at 657 E. Lincoln Highway, were arrested Tuesday night on more than 250 counts eachs of theft, falsifying public records, executing documents by deception and violating state tax laws. They were arraigned before District Justice Catherine Marks, who set bail at $750,000 cash each.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Nate Ben's Reliable Inc., the well-known Philadelphia furniture and appliance store whose customers included such notables as Mayor Goode and Von Hayes, was not true to its name when it came to paying sales taxes, pocketing at least $1.1 million over 20 years, authorities charged yesterday. State Attorney General Ernie Preate Jr. said the charges against the Center City store's three principal owners - brothers Nathan Benn, 71, Herman Benn, 66, and Reuben Ben, 61 - and five employees constituted the largest sales-tax- fraud case ever filed in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
A Narberth man who owned and operated a company that processed dental claims for labor union health and welfare funds was convicted by a federal jury Tuesday of willfully filing false tax returns from 1999 through 2002. Jonathon Felix, 51, who owned and operated United Professional Plans, Inc., which received management fees on a per claim or per person basis to process claims and resolve disputes between labor union members and dental providers. Among the unions UPPI worked for was District Council 33 of AFSCME, which represents the city of Philadelphia's blue-collar workers.
SPORTS
March 7, 2012
Former Eagles wide receiver Freddie Mitchell has been charged with tax fraud for his role in a scheme to file false federal returns on behalf of professional athletes. The faked returns sought refunds ranging from $170,000 to $1.9 million. That money was to be split among Mitchell, his two coconspirators, and the named tax filer. The indictment, filed by the U.S. attorney in Orlando last April, details how Mitchell, 33, recruited clients for a tax return business run by Jamie Russ-Walls and Richard Walls, both of Bensalem.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former IRS worker faces more than a dozen years in prison after a jury convicted her Wednesday of masterminding a scheme to collect thousands of dollars in refunds by filing bogus claims for tax credits. The jurors deliberated less than a day before finding Patricia Fountain, 35, guilty of conspiracy and tax fraud charges. They also convicted her boyfriend, Larry Ishmael, 40, and a third conspirator, Calvin Johnson Jr., on similar counts. All are Philadelphia residents. The weeklong trial before U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell showcased how an IRS insider used her own experience with the agency to exploit its vulnerabilities and rip it off for nearly five years.
NEWS
January 27, 2010 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
A popular Philadelphia hip-hop nightspot and its principal manager were charged by a federal grand jury yesterday with filing false tax returns and related offenses. Authorities said that the Palmer Social Club, at 6th and Spring Garden, which is a tax-exempt nonprofit, underreported its gross receipts for tax years 2004 and 2005 by more than $1.6 million. The huge private club, which takes up three floors of an old religious-goods warehouse, is one of the city's few after-hours spots.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
This is what will make news in Philadelphia this week: COURTS Slammer for Beanie Sigel? Sentencing is scheduled for rapper Beanie Sigel, who pleaded guilty earlier this year to failing to file federal income-tax returns for 2003 to 2005. Federal prosecutors are seeking the maximum allowable sentence, which is three years. Sigel, whose actual name is Dwight Grant, earned in excess of $1 million in net income those years and owes approximately $348,077 in taxes, prosecutors said in a sentencing memorandum.
NEWS
June 9, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The owners and managers of the Nifty Fifty's restaurant chain pleaded guilty in federal court to tax evasion and skimming cash from the business. Co-owner Robert Mattei, 73, of Delray Beach, Fla., pleaded guilty to conspiracy, tax evasion, and bank fraud, and faces up to 40 years in prison and a $1.5 million fine. Co-owner Leo McGlynn, 52, of Swarthmore, and Joseph Donnelly, 49, of Springfield, Delaware County, a head manager, pleaded to conspiracy, tax evasion, and bank fraud and aggravated structuring of financial transactions.
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
The Palmer Social Club, a Philly hip-hop nightspot, entered a guilty plea yesterday in federal district court to filing false tax returns, and its former manager, Michael Weiss, copped a plea to corruptly obstructing the administration of federal tax laws. Weiss, 46, of Center City, admitted he gave bogus financial statements to Palmer's corporate accountant to prepare its 2004 and 2005 tax returns. The false tax returns then were signed by Weiss and filed with the IRS by Palmer, the government's plea memo said.
NEWS
December 3, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Basketball and brains had taken Joe Sturgis from West Catholic High to the University of Pennsylvania, to the Big Five Hall of Fame, and into the boardroom of one of the city's top law firms. Booze would be his downfall. Sturgis, 64, who gave up his license to practice law three years ago, yesterday was placed on house arrest for six months, and on probation for three years, for an admitted $15,000 income tax fraud. He'd admitted stealing nearly $50,000 from his former law firm, Saul, Ewing, Remick & Saul, and failing to report this money as taxable income, avoiding payment of about $15,000 in federal income taxes.
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