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Tax Law

NEWS
August 6, 1988 | By JEFFREY TAYLOR, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Goode, reacting to the disclosure of a multi-million-dollar property- tax break for condominium owners at a Rittenhouse Square high-rise, said yesterday that the city's tax exemption program may need to be changed. While defending the tax break for owners at The Rittenhouse condo and hotel project, Goode acknowledged that a 1978 tax law declaring the entire city a "deterioriating area" for exemption purposes was outdated. It was under that law that The Rittenhouse, located in one of the city's most affluent neighborhoods, received a five-year exemption that could save each condo owner from $30,000 to $130,000.
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If an ordinary citizen had done what House Speaker Newt Gingrich has admitted he did, that person would be in jail, his critics in Congress complain. And, they say, he lied to congressional investigators. Gingrich's supporters insist he is guilty only of an unintentional violation of an "arcane tax law" and should not be condemned for it. They say he didn't lie to those investigators; he misled them by mistake. On Saturday, in what was essentially a plea bargain, Gingrich formally agreed with an ethics subcommittee charge that he provided investigators with "inaccurate, incomplete and unreliable" information.
NEWS
August 4, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, Sonia Krishnan and Rena Singer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Peco Energy Co.'s filing of an appeal Thursday that seeks to have its Limerick plant declared worthless for real-estate tax purposes was just the first public shot in a potentially huge tax feud between utilities and local governments statewide. At a news conference yesterday, Montgomery County officials said that a handful of other public utilities, which together own 45 properties in the county, say their facilities are not worth a nickel either. The Limerick plant was built in the 1970s at a cost of $6 billion.
NEWS
January 30, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Significant relief from the Philadelphia wage tax for nonresidents does not appear imminent, according to two of the most powerful legislators in Harrisburg. House Speaker Matthew Ryan and Senate Majority Leader F. Joseph Loeper, both of Delaware County, told a group of business people Friday that tax reform is hindered because of a state law known as the Sterling Act, and because of Mayor Rendell's proposed small tax cut for nonresidents who work in the city. The Sterling Act, named for its author, former Rep. Philip Sterling, was enacted in the 1930s to help Philadelphia generate tax revenues by taxing nonresidents who work in the city.
NEWS
June 15, 2006 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
After nearly three decades of debate, lawmakers last night finally approved landmark legislation that will deliver property tax cuts to most Pennsylvanians. Shortly before 9 o'clock, the House voted, 137-61, to pass a bill that would initially more than double the number of senior citizens eligible for property-tax rebate checks. Later, it would also help offset property-tax bills for other homeowners through revenue from slot-machine gambling. In Philadelphia, most residents would receive wage-tax relief instead, although city seniors would qualify for expanded property-tax and rent rebates.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
A CITY COUNCILMAN may be in hot water if he accepted charitable donations for a worthy cause but failed to alert the federal government of his philanthropic efforts. Councilman Kenyatta Johnson, whose 2nd District includes parts of Center City, Southwest and South Philadelphia, runs a group called Peace Not Guns, which aims to foster a partnership among youth, city agencies and community groups to stem gun violence. Even before he became a state representative, Johnson had a history of community service and advocacy, but a recent discovery about his self-proclaimed nonprofit organization has gotten him into some controversy.
NEWS
May 14, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE CHAIRMAN of Ballard Spahr, one of Philadelphia's most prominent law firms, was at a loss for words. How to describe Rick Ballard and his impact, not only on the firm but on the community, his family, his friends and the nation? Speaking yesterday while still stunned by Rick's death on Sunday, Mark Stewart could only say: "I could sit here for hours and still not have the words to adequately describe Rick's importance to the firm, his achievements as a lawyer and his impact on those of us who were lucky enough to know him. "Rick was what every lawyer should want to be: fiercely smart, caring, a gentleman.
SPORTS
November 9, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though he was sacked an astounding 29 times in 10 games as the 1976 Eagles starting quarterback, there were other reasons Mike Boryla never felt entirely comfortable in pro football. The sport's one-dimensional demands confined the curious Stanford graduate, whose restless mind and varied interests were, then as now, football anomalies. "I never really considered myself a football player," Boryla said earlier this week from his Colorado home. "I considered myself a student, an intellectual.
NEWS
April 18, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Here are some reasons I have such deep admiration and respect for Congress and the thousands of federal bureaucrats who oversee our lives. In 1913, Americans began paying income tax. That year, the standard individual tax form - the 1040 - was three pages long. It came with one page of instructions. I have a copy of that original 1040. The page of instructions was numbered from 1 to 20 and written in clear, everyday language. The three-page tax form was so simple that anybody who could read, write and do basic arithmetic could handle it. Rich, middle-class or poor, you would have no need to pay H&R Block or a CPA. That year, the entire federal income-tax law, covering everyone in the country, was 16 pages long.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Ilene Raymond Rush writes and blogs from Elkins Park A few years back, when I was teaching fiction writing at Penn State's main campus, I'd ask my student advisees a single question: "Can you think about doing anything else?" It was a question that had been posed to me early in my undergraduate English education by an earnest female professor when I eagerly confessed that I wanted to be a writer of short fiction. While it brought me up short, I have to admit that the question was an honest response to the lousy state of the economy in the mid-1970s.
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