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Tax Law

NEWS
August 6, 1988 | By JEFFREY TAYLOR, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Goode, reacting to the disclosure of a multi-million-dollar property- tax break for condominium owners at a Rittenhouse Square high-rise, said yesterday that the city's tax exemption program may need to be changed. While defending the tax break for owners at The Rittenhouse condo and hotel project, Goode acknowledged that a 1978 tax law declaring the entire city a "deterioriating area" for exemption purposes was outdated. It was under that law that The Rittenhouse, located in one of the city's most affluent neighborhoods, received a five-year exemption that could save each condo owner from $30,000 to $130,000.
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If an ordinary citizen had done what House Speaker Newt Gingrich has admitted he did, that person would be in jail, his critics in Congress complain. And, they say, he lied to congressional investigators. Gingrich's supporters insist he is guilty only of an unintentional violation of an "arcane tax law" and should not be condemned for it. They say he didn't lie to those investigators; he misled them by mistake. On Saturday, in what was essentially a plea bargain, Gingrich formally agreed with an ethics subcommittee charge that he provided investigators with "inaccurate, incomplete and unreliable" information.
NEWS
August 4, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, Sonia Krishnan and Rena Singer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Peco Energy Co.'s filing of an appeal Thursday that seeks to have its Limerick plant declared worthless for real-estate tax purposes was just the first public shot in a potentially huge tax feud between utilities and local governments statewide. At a news conference yesterday, Montgomery County officials said that a handful of other public utilities, which together own 45 properties in the county, say their facilities are not worth a nickel either. The Limerick plant was built in the 1970s at a cost of $6 billion.
NEWS
January 30, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Significant relief from the Philadelphia wage tax for nonresidents does not appear imminent, according to two of the most powerful legislators in Harrisburg. House Speaker Matthew Ryan and Senate Majority Leader F. Joseph Loeper, both of Delaware County, told a group of business people Friday that tax reform is hindered because of a state law known as the Sterling Act, and because of Mayor Rendell's proposed small tax cut for nonresidents who work in the city. The Sterling Act, named for its author, former Rep. Philip Sterling, was enacted in the 1930s to help Philadelphia generate tax revenues by taxing nonresidents who work in the city.
NEWS
June 15, 2006 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
After nearly three decades of debate, lawmakers last night finally approved landmark legislation that will deliver property tax cuts to most Pennsylvanians. Shortly before 9 o'clock, the House voted, 137-61, to pass a bill that would initially more than double the number of senior citizens eligible for property-tax rebate checks. Later, it would also help offset property-tax bills for other homeowners through revenue from slot-machine gambling. In Philadelphia, most residents would receive wage-tax relief instead, although city seniors would qualify for expanded property-tax and rent rebates.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A tax expert retained by former Vanguard Group tax lawyer David Danon in his whistle-blower complaints against the mutual fund giant has sent the IRS a report estimating the company's unpaid federal income tax liabilities at $34.6 billion from 2007 to 2014. "If the IRS were to pursue this matter, it will prevail in court," wrote Reuven S. Avi-Yonah, law professor at the University of Michigan Law School, in his report. Malvern-based Vanguard, the nation's largest mutual fund company, "has no legal justification" for charging its mutual funds artificially low management fees that reduce its reported profits and tax obligations, Avi-Yonah wrote.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Americans can expect secretive groups to eagerly donate money to 2016 presidential and congressional campaigns even as candidates try to deny the corrupting nature of cash received from groups trying to influence government contracts, appointments, or laws that benefit certain businesses or ideologies. The unseemly practice would stop if the government agencies given the power to do something about the expected flood of dark money would only act. But don't hold your breath waiting for that.
NEWS
April 18, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Here are some reasons I have such deep admiration and respect for Congress and the thousands of federal bureaucrats who oversee our lives. In 1913, Americans began paying income tax. That year, the standard individual tax form - the 1040 - was three pages long. It came with one page of instructions. I have a copy of that original 1040. The page of instructions was numbered from 1 to 20 and written in clear, everyday language. The three-page tax form was so simple that anybody who could read, write and do basic arithmetic could handle it. Rich, middle-class or poor, you would have no need to pay H&R Block or a CPA. That year, the entire federal income-tax law, covering everyone in the country, was 16 pages long.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Before and after Anthony M. Lario was a New Jersey Superior Court judge, daughter Lynn Miller said, he was proud of his work as a pro bono lawyer. "I can't tell you how many times there were food items and pastries left on our back steps," Miller said. "Left by people he would help and not charge. " Those clients, she said, were often "a lot of immigrants . . . people he knew could not afford it. " On Sunday, May 15, Judge Lario, 95, of Cherry Hill, a Superior Court judge in Tax Court from 1979 to 1990, died at Methodist Hospital.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1987 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
The first installment of a Bell of Pennsylvania rate reduction will appear on many customers' bills next month as a one-time credit of about $1.40, the company said today. Starting next year, the reduction would amount to $68 million a year. Next month's credit totals $15 million in reduced rates. The reductions are prompted by tax savings resulting from the new federal tax law. The credit would appear next month if the state Public Utility Commission approves, Bell said.
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