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Tax Law

NEWS
August 6, 1988 | By JEFFREY TAYLOR, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Goode, reacting to the disclosure of a multi-million-dollar property- tax break for condominium owners at a Rittenhouse Square high-rise, said yesterday that the city's tax exemption program may need to be changed. While defending the tax break for owners at The Rittenhouse condo and hotel project, Goode acknowledged that a 1978 tax law declaring the entire city a "deterioriating area" for exemption purposes was outdated. It was under that law that The Rittenhouse, located in one of the city's most affluent neighborhoods, received a five-year exemption that could save each condo owner from $30,000 to $130,000.
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If an ordinary citizen had done what House Speaker Newt Gingrich has admitted he did, that person would be in jail, his critics in Congress complain. And, they say, he lied to congressional investigators. Gingrich's supporters insist he is guilty only of an unintentional violation of an "arcane tax law" and should not be condemned for it. They say he didn't lie to those investigators; he misled them by mistake. On Saturday, in what was essentially a plea bargain, Gingrich formally agreed with an ethics subcommittee charge that he provided investigators with "inaccurate, incomplete and unreliable" information.
NEWS
August 4, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, Sonia Krishnan and Rena Singer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Peco Energy Co.'s filing of an appeal Thursday that seeks to have its Limerick plant declared worthless for real-estate tax purposes was just the first public shot in a potentially huge tax feud between utilities and local governments statewide. At a news conference yesterday, Montgomery County officials said that a handful of other public utilities, which together own 45 properties in the county, say their facilities are not worth a nickel either. The Limerick plant was built in the 1970s at a cost of $6 billion.
NEWS
January 30, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Significant relief from the Philadelphia wage tax for nonresidents does not appear imminent, according to two of the most powerful legislators in Harrisburg. House Speaker Matthew Ryan and Senate Majority Leader F. Joseph Loeper, both of Delaware County, told a group of business people Friday that tax reform is hindered because of a state law known as the Sterling Act, and because of Mayor Rendell's proposed small tax cut for nonresidents who work in the city. The Sterling Act, named for its author, former Rep. Philip Sterling, was enacted in the 1930s to help Philadelphia generate tax revenues by taxing nonresidents who work in the city.
NEWS
June 15, 2006 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
After nearly three decades of debate, lawmakers last night finally approved landmark legislation that will deliver property tax cuts to most Pennsylvanians. Shortly before 9 o'clock, the House voted, 137-61, to pass a bill that would initially more than double the number of senior citizens eligible for property-tax rebate checks. Later, it would also help offset property-tax bills for other homeowners through revenue from slot-machine gambling. In Philadelphia, most residents would receive wage-tax relief instead, although city seniors would qualify for expanded property-tax and rent rebates.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Americans can expect secretive groups to eagerly donate money to 2016 presidential and congressional campaigns even as candidates try to deny the corrupting nature of cash received from groups trying to influence government contracts, appointments, or laws that benefit certain businesses or ideologies. The unseemly practice would stop if the government agencies given the power to do something about the expected flood of dark money would only act. But don't hold your breath waiting for that.
SPORTS
November 9, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though he was sacked an astounding 29 times in 10 games as the 1976 Eagles starting quarterback, there were other reasons Mike Boryla never felt entirely comfortable in pro football. The sport's one-dimensional demands confined the curious Stanford graduate, whose restless mind and varied interests were, then as now, football anomalies. "I never really considered myself a football player," Boryla said earlier this week from his Colorado home. "I considered myself a student, an intellectual.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Patrick Kerkstra, For The Inquirer
The neighbors did what they could to dress up the gaping wound on their block. They painted the steps black and the porch a bold bluish-green. In the fall, they put a pot of mums out front. But cosmetic touches do only so much for an abandoned shell of a house with sheet metal for windows and a slab of plywood for a door. This wreck in the working-class 4400 block of North Orianna Street in the city's Feltonville section is just one of about 100,000 tax-delinquent properties in Philadelphia, a $5,780 drop in a half-billion-dollar bucket of defaulted payments to the city and School District.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After more than three years of failing to file required IRS forms, two Camden charter schools have lost their tax-exempt status, a requirement to be granted a New Jersey charter. LEAP Academy University Charter School and Camden Pride Elementary Charter School were listed Wednesday by the IRS as having their 501(c)(3) status revoked. The IRS automatically revokes an organization's tax-exempt status if it fails to file Form 990 for three consecutive years. Both schools officially lost their status in 2010.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terence K. Heaney, 71, of Gulph Mills, a lawyer and certified public accountant, died of complications from esophageal cancer Sunday, Dec. 2, at Neighborhood Hospice in West Chester. Mr. Heaney was a partner with the law firm of Heaney, Kilcoyne, Bleczinski & Kelm in King of Prussia. As an authority on tax law, he lectured at conferences and universities and participated in tax seminars around the country. He was also a guest on the subject of taxes on TV and radio programs and was often interviewed by Inquirer reporters.
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