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Tax Law

NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court's ruling on the constitutionality of President Obama's health-care overhaul is likely to shake the presidential race in early summer. But the winners in court won't necessarily be the winners in the political arena. No doubt, a decision to throw out the entire law would be a defeat for Obama. His judgment and leadership, even his reputation as a former constitutional-law professor, would be called into question. But it would not spell certain doom for his reelection.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2012 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A few weeks ago, President Obama released a proposal to lower the federal corporate tax rate - a move that on its face would seem to be good news for small businesses. But the president's pitch isn't getting rave reviews. Advocates for small business say the plan would benefit a relatively low number of small companies and leave many business owners with higher tax bills. The proposal, released Feb. 22, calls for the top corporate tax rate to fall from its current 35 percent to 28 percent.
NEWS
January 16, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
YOU MIGHT expect a lawyer who specialized in such subjects as business, real estate and tax law, estate planning and the like to be a pretty straight-laced guy. Not Bill Copperthwaite. He had that kind of dry sense of humor that sneaks up on you. "You'd be out to dinner three hours later and you'd remember something he said and start laughing," said his son, Bill III. "You'd say, 'That was really funny.' " William H. Copperthwaite Jr., a hardworking lawyer who put in long hours on the job and who had such a phenomenal memory that he knew everybody's birthday, graduation dates and anniversaries, died of a heart attack Tuesday.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2011 | By Richard Rubin, Bloomberg News
Payroll processors watched Congress' debate over extending a payroll-tax cut with frustration, and they were warning companies about the difficulty of implementing a temporary provision passed by the Senate. Payroll companies can react quickly to a yearlong extension for the first paycheck of 2012 or adjust the second paycheck to correct problems, said Pete Isberg, president of the National Payroll Reporting Consortium, an industry group. Payroll providers still do not like a second consecutive year of December tax-law changes or the Senate-backed two-month extension of the tax cut that could create unprecedented complications.
NEWS
December 19, 2011
Applaud values Tebow represents Fifty years ago, Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow would have been considered an all-American idol. He's handsome, athletic, religious, and moral. He represents traditional values of personal restraint, selflessness, and love of family and God ("So far, Tebow is defying all the cynics," Dec. 11). Today we live in a society that has been almost completely purged of this image by a boomer generation relentless in its quest to tear down anything that smacks of traditionalism.
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
IT'S BEEN A long time coming, but a City Council committee yesterday approved two measures that would drastically alter the city's business-tax structure, and Mayor Nutter is on board. Council's Committee on Finance approved a bill introduced by Council members Bill Green and Maria Quinones-Sanchez that would exempt the first $100,000 in business receipts from both gross-receipts and the net-income portions of the tax for all businesses, protecting smaller city-based businesses and startups.
NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David V. Randall, 86, a partner in the Ballard Spahr law firm who was chairman of the watchdog Committee of Seventy in the 1970s, died Saturday, Oct. 15, of multiple myeloma at Springfield Residences, a retirement community in Wyndmoor. Mr. Randall, born in Danville, Pa., graduated from Wyoming Seminary and earned a bachelor's degree in English at Lehigh University. A 1954 Inquirer article reported that he had been associated with his father "in the operation of coal-mining properties in Lykens, Mahanoy City, and Mount Carmel.
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
SALMON FISHING in Mongolia? Why not? If the fish were biting, David V. Randall was happy no matter where he was. "It took three planes and a helicopter to get there," said his son, David E. Randall, a frequent fishing companion. There were also fishing jaunts to Labrador, to Mexico, to Montana - wherever there was a swift river and hungry fish. A favorite spot was the Miramichi River, in New Brunswick, where he went at least once a year for salmon. David Randall, a Philadelphia lawyer specializing in tax law, a onetime executive secretary to Gov. George Leader and an author of books ranging from mystery novels to a history of the National Football League, died Saturday after a long illness.
NEWS
August 27, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Wolfman, 87, the University of Pennsylvania Law School dean from 1970 to 1975, died of heart failure Saturday, Aug. 20, while visiting a relative in West Orange, N.J. He resided in Cambridge, Mass. Michael A. Fitts, current Penn Law dean, wrote in an appreciation on the Penn Law website: "For more than 60 years, Bernie was a highly distinguished tax academic and expert - as well as a very loyal Penn alumnus. He will be greatly missed. " Mr. Wolfman went on to be Fessenden Professor of Law at Harvard Law School from 1976 to 2007.
NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
After four days of testimony, it took a federal jury about an hour Monday to convict a dentist who the government said had not filed an accurate tax return since 1992. Richard P. Kaufman, 61, who had a practice in Newtown Square, was immediately incarcerated pending sentencing in November before U.S. District Judge Juan Sanchez. Kaufman faces 33 to 41 months for failing to file tax returns, attempting to obstruct the IRS, and filing false claims. Earlier, he told the jurors that he did not intentionally break the law, and that they had to decide whether "I'm a reasonable man who made some decisions that the government thinks are criminal, despite my thinking that I did the right thing.
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