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Tax Law

BUSINESS
September 22, 2012 | By Richard Rubin, Bloomberg News
A U.S. Senate committee memo said Microsoft Corp. used aggressive international tax maneuvers to avoid paying billions of dollars in taxes over the last three years. The committee memo, released for a hearing Thursday in Washington, said Microsoft used transactions with subsidiaries in Puerto Rico, Ireland, Singapore, and Bermuda to save at least $6.5 billion in taxes. The committee also disclosed that Hewlett-Packard Co. used a series of short-term internal loans that allowed the company to tap its offshore cash for domestic operations without paying taxes, according to the memo.
NEWS
August 16, 2012
Voting against now the priority I no longer need look at President Obama's record. My difficulties with his softness, his failure to carry out some of his campaign promises, and his poor foreign policy have all faded away. The Republicans have inspired me to work hard against them ("The Ryan platform: Bold, but risky," Wednesday). With Paul Ryan and his philosophy on the Republican ticket, voting against is now more the determiner than voting for. Harold Rosenthal, Philadelphia Does VP choice make a difference?
NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court's ruling on the constitutionality of President Obama's health-care overhaul is likely to shake the presidential race in early summer. But the winners in court won't necessarily be the winners in the political arena. No doubt, a decision to throw out the entire law would be a defeat for Obama. His judgment and leadership, even his reputation as a former constitutional-law professor, would be called into question. But it would not spell certain doom for his reelection.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2012 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A few weeks ago, President Obama released a proposal to lower the federal corporate tax rate - a move that on its face would seem to be good news for small businesses. But the president's pitch isn't getting rave reviews. Advocates for small business say the plan would benefit a relatively low number of small companies and leave many business owners with higher tax bills. The proposal, released Feb. 22, calls for the top corporate tax rate to fall from its current 35 percent to 28 percent.
NEWS
January 16, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
YOU MIGHT expect a lawyer who specialized in such subjects as business, real estate and tax law, estate planning and the like to be a pretty straight-laced guy. Not Bill Copperthwaite. He had that kind of dry sense of humor that sneaks up on you. "You'd be out to dinner three hours later and you'd remember something he said and start laughing," said his son, Bill III. "You'd say, 'That was really funny.' " William H. Copperthwaite Jr., a hardworking lawyer who put in long hours on the job and who had such a phenomenal memory that he knew everybody's birthday, graduation dates and anniversaries, died of a heart attack Tuesday.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2011 | By Richard Rubin, Bloomberg News
Payroll processors watched Congress' debate over extending a payroll-tax cut with frustration, and they were warning companies about the difficulty of implementing a temporary provision passed by the Senate. Payroll companies can react quickly to a yearlong extension for the first paycheck of 2012 or adjust the second paycheck to correct problems, said Pete Isberg, president of the National Payroll Reporting Consortium, an industry group. Payroll providers still do not like a second consecutive year of December tax-law changes or the Senate-backed two-month extension of the tax cut that could create unprecedented complications.
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
IT'S BEEN A long time coming, but a City Council committee yesterday approved two measures that would drastically alter the city's business-tax structure, and Mayor Nutter is on board. Council's Committee on Finance approved a bill introduced by Council members Bill Green and Maria Quinones-Sanchez that would exempt the first $100,000 in business receipts from both gross-receipts and the net-income portions of the tax for all businesses, protecting smaller city-based businesses and startups.
NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David V. Randall, 86, a partner in the Ballard Spahr law firm who was chairman of the watchdog Committee of Seventy in the 1970s, died Saturday, Oct. 15, of multiple myeloma at Springfield Residences, a retirement community in Wyndmoor. Mr. Randall, born in Danville, Pa., graduated from Wyoming Seminary and earned a bachelor's degree in English at Lehigh University. A 1954 Inquirer article reported that he had been associated with his father "in the operation of coal-mining properties in Lykens, Mahanoy City, and Mount Carmel.
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
SALMON FISHING in Mongolia? Why not? If the fish were biting, David V. Randall was happy no matter where he was. "It took three planes and a helicopter to get there," said his son, David E. Randall, a frequent fishing companion. There were also fishing jaunts to Labrador, to Mexico, to Montana - wherever there was a swift river and hungry fish. A favorite spot was the Miramichi River, in New Brunswick, where he went at least once a year for salmon. David Randall, a Philadelphia lawyer specializing in tax law, a onetime executive secretary to Gov. George Leader and an author of books ranging from mystery novels to a history of the National Football League, died Saturday after a long illness.
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