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Tax Policy

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NEWS
October 15, 1999 | by Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
City Council unanimously passed a resolution yesterday to hold public hearings on the city's current and future tax policy and to examine how that policy affects individuals and businesses. The resolution, sponsored by Councilmen Michael Nutter and James Kenney, calls on the Committee on Commerce and Economic Development, which is chaired by Nutter, to seek advice and recommendations on tax policy and tax reform from local and national financial experts. The action came only hours before Republican mayoral nominee Sam Katz unveiled his plan to cut the city's wage tax to 4 percent by the end of the next mayor's first term.
NEWS
February 29, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey lawmakers are considering several changes to tax policy that could affect residents across the income spectrum. The five-year plan Gov. Christie implemented in 2011 to fund the state's roads, bridges, and rail expires when the fiscal year ends June 30. With the Transportation Trust Fund set to run out of money then, lawmakers widely expect to raise New Jersey's 14.5-cent-per-gallon tax on gasoline, which is the second lowest in the...
NEWS
May 12, 2011
An Inquirer article, "Version of New Jersey's new law to lure businesses has cost Pennsylvania" ( May 2,) misses the bigger picture. If Pennsylvania is to compete globally, it must have a pro-growth plan that attracts new companies to locate here and encourages those already in business here to expand operations. In other words, the state needs a tax policy that will enhance its attractiveness. More than half of all the states in the nation have passed some form of single sales factor tax apportionment, recognizing its importance in attracting, retaining, and expanding business.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
I'm relieved that Prince Frederick Von Anhalt has come along to explain the rationale behind the recent vote in the House of Representatives in favor of cutting the tax on capital gains. I've been trying to explain the theory of federal tax policy for years without much success. Who would have thought that all we needed to clear this up was a prince who lives in Beverly Hills? A long time ago, I tried to explain that one way to look at tax policy was as a statement of the government's values.
NEWS
February 17, 2010 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Nutter administration will experiment with new tax policies to retain research-and-development firms and the growing video-gaming software industry, Mayor Nutter said yesterday. In a speech before the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, Mayor Nutter announced two pilot programs aimed at making the city's vilified business-privilege tax less onerous for those two sectors. Officials said the programs didn't require City Council approval and would be introduced by the revenue commissioner in the spring as new regulations.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney joined business groups, construction and janitors' union leaders, and state legislators from both parties Friday to endorse a tax-reform plan backed by Center City's biggest office landlord. A bill sponsored by State Reps. John Taylor (R., Phila.) and Bill Keller (D., Phila.), among others, would change Pennsylvania law to allow the city to boost business real estate taxes by 15 percent above residential real estate taxes, then use the extra to cut city wage and business-privilege taxes.
NEWS
October 9, 2014
HOW ABOUT some tax talk? Wait, wait, don't leave. This is important, or could be. It's a big part of the governor's race and likely to be a focus of the final debate in Pittsburgh tonight. Republican Gov. Corbett says he should be re-elected for keeping taxes low and because Democrat Tom Wolf will raise taxes - without saying how much. Wolf argues Corbett's management and tax policy hurt education, job creation and state fiscal ratings. Wolf says he just wants to make taxes fairer.
NEWS
August 11, 2009
ONE ISSUE always gets people talking: taxes. And on Thursday, you can talk with the people who have been charged with shaping tax policy for Philadelphia. Mayor Nutter's Task Force on Tax Policy and Economic Competitiveness holds a public hearing from 4 to 6:30 p.m. in Council Chambers. Appointed by Nutter in February, the task force comprises corporate leaders, small-business owners, academics and union officials. They are charged with making recommendations to overhaul Philadelphia's tax system.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Barry M. Popkin
MAJOR RESISTANCE in the seven other countries proposing or adopting taxes on sugar-sweetened drinks has come from the beverage industry. However, it's only in the United States where a prominent progressive voice such as Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has offered strident opposition. In other countries, such as the United Kingdom, France and Mexico, progressives have promoted these taxes. The beverage industry and the few progressives who align with it call these taxes "regressive," warning that they that hurt the poor.
NEWS
December 3, 2010
THIS WEEK, City Hall was the site of two holiday miracles: from the mayor, we got the return of Christmas; and from City Council, a passionate debate about the economic future of Philadelphia. Council just spent two long days debating a radical change to Philadelphia's business taxes. Proposed by City Councilwoman Maria Quiones Sanchez and Councilman Bill Green, the bill would alter the current tax-cutting strategy and replace it with a system that they say would redistribute the burden from smaller Philadelphia-based businesses to big corporations headquartered elsewhere.
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NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie on Monday suggested that he wasn't ready to support a proposal to revise New Jersey tax policy, including a hefty gas tax hike and phaseout of a levy on estates of the deceased. His remarks came as a coalition of Democratic and Republican lawmakers - backed by organized labor, business, and other groups - heralded the plan as game-changing legislation that would fund critical investments in roads and bridges while also saving taxpayers about $1 billion annually through other policy changes.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey lawmakers made a renewed push Friday to replenish the state's fund for road, bridge, and rail projects, which is expected to run out of money over the summer. One plan would likely raise the state's gas tax, currently the second lowest in the nation at 14.5 cents per gallon, to 37.5 cents per gallon. A gallon of regular gasoline in New Jersey cost an average of $2.15 on Friday, according to the consumer group AAA. Senate Budget Chairman Paul Sarlo (D., Bergen) and Sen. Steve Oroho (R., Sussex)
NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council President Darrell L. Clarke told a panel of state lawmakers Thursday that he opposed a bill that would amend the state constitution to allow Philadelphia to impose different tax rates on commercial and residential real estate. Although he would like the General Assembly to be allowed to establish classes of property - currently forbidden by the state constitution's uniformity clause that requires all real estate to be treated the same - he said the current bill could tie the city's hands in harmful ways.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Barry M. Popkin
MAJOR RESISTANCE in the seven other countries proposing or adopting taxes on sugar-sweetened drinks has come from the beverage industry. However, it's only in the United States where a prominent progressive voice such as Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has offered strident opposition. In other countries, such as the United Kingdom, France and Mexico, progressives have promoted these taxes. The beverage industry and the few progressives who align with it call these taxes "regressive," warning that they that hurt the poor.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Josh Vincent
WHEN JIM KENNEY was elected mayor, we knew what we were getting: a man who wanted to protect and to grow the city and its children. That's what we got. Many Philadelphians of goodwill are in an ethical quandary: Do we agree that a robust pre-K covering the vulnerable children of Philadelphia is a good idea? Also parks, libraries, rec centers and green jobs? Of course. There's a plan for that: It'll cost $95 million a year over four years. Who's going to pay for it? There's the rub. The funding solution lies in an increased sales tax, an excise tax, really.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Now that Republicans and Democrats have mostly sorted their choices for president, isn't it time for Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and their interpreters to show us more about how they will raise money and pay for their schemes of growth and greatness? How do Americans want our taxes spent? "Helping to ensure the Social Security system will not run out of money should be the top economic issue addressed by the next U.S. President," agreed 640 of the 1,000 adults queried last month by Harris Poll for the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the pros licensed to track money for businesses and people who can afford CPAs.
NEWS
February 29, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey lawmakers are considering several changes to tax policy that could affect residents across the income spectrum. The five-year plan Gov. Christie implemented in 2011 to fund the state's roads, bridges, and rail expires when the fiscal year ends June 30. With the Transportation Trust Fund set to run out of money then, lawmakers widely expect to raise New Jersey's 14.5-cent-per-gallon tax on gasoline, which is the second lowest in the...
BUSINESS
February 28, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney joined business groups, construction and janitors' union leaders, and state legislators from both parties Friday to endorse a tax-reform plan backed by Center City's biggest office landlord. A bill sponsored by State Reps. John Taylor (R., Phila.) and Bill Keller (D., Phila.), among others, would change Pennsylvania law to allow the city to boost business real estate taxes by 15 percent above residential real estate taxes, then use the extra to cut city wage and business-privilege taxes.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2016
This holiday season, Congress decided, once again, that it is really important to give. The budget agreement passed in mid-December was an example of the good old-fashioned pork-trading typical of past Congresses - at least until political purity and party warfare became the preferred form of non-governing. While going back to the future did prevent another government shutdown, it is doubtful the old strategy amounts to responsible budgeting policy. The bipartisan tax-and- spending Christmas tree has too many special deals under it to list in one, two or maybe even three of these columns.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The drugmaker Pfizer Inc. said Monday that it had agreed to take control of Allergan plc, the manufacturer of Botox, in a $160 billion transaction that would be the largest pharmaceutical deal in history. The deal is largely prompted by Pfizer's desire to move its company registration to Ireland so it will pay lower corporate taxes than it does in the United States. If completed, it would combine Pfizer's well-known drugs Viagra and Lipitor with Allergan's famous wrinkle remover. Pfizer would pay Allergan shareholders to absorb their company and take its Irish registration, which was achieved through an earlier acquisition.
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