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Tax

NEWS
April 18, 2011 | By Charles Krauthammer
The most serious charge against Rep. Paul Ryan's budget is not the risible claim, made most prominently by President Obama in his George Washington University address, that it would "sacrifice the America we believe in. " The serious charge is that the Ryan plan fails by its own standards: that because it only cuts spending without raising taxes, it accumulates trillions in debt and doesn't balance the budget until the 2030s. If the debt is such a national emergency, they say, Ryan never really gets you there from here.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | Associated Press
DUBLIN - Debt-mired Ireland is facing a revolt over its new property tax. The government said less than half of the country's 1.6 million households had paid the charge by Saturday's deadline to avoid penalties. And about 5,000 marched in protest against the annual conference of Prime Minister Enda Kenny's Fine Gael party. Emotions ran raw as police backed by officers on horseback stopped demonstrators from entering the Dublin Convention Centre. Many protesters booed and heckled passers-by who were wearing Fine Gael conference passes, some screaming vulgar insults in their faces.
NEWS
March 7, 1988 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Under the glare of television lights, Susan Bass Levin took a seat next to the smiling talk-show host and confessed that she was nervous. Cherry Hill's ordinarily poised and confident mayor was about to explain why the township's budget would require an 82 percent local tax increase this year. And she was going to do it on a live television call-in show. Before the broadcast on NYT Cable TV on Thursday evening, Levin fidgeted in her powder-blue chair. But after a quick run-through, she was ready to go. "I'll be fine," Levin said after the practice run. "I've been through this so many times, I could do it in my sleep.
NEWS
December 10, 2002 | By Peter Sigal INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just three Bucks County residents attended the sole public hearing on a proposed 2003 budget that would raise property taxes by 8.1 percent. But, as County Commissioner Charles H. Martin noted during the meeting last night at the county courthouse, "that's three more than last year. " Notwithstanding the meager public input, commissioners pledged to reduce the tax increase before they vote on the budget Dec. 18. "The bottom line is we've asked the Finance Department to reduce the [tax increase]
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1986 | By Michael Kimmelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Senate subcommittee yesterday approved a bill that would add a tax of as much as 25 percent to the cost of all sound-recording machines not equipped with a new anti-copying device. The device prevents the duplication of records, compact disks and prerecorded tapes. The proposed bill, which now goes to the Senate Judiciary Committee for consideration, is intended to recoup income for record companies and recording artists that they say has been lost because of home taping.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
HARRISBURG - Gov. Corbett's administration has joined talks on transportation-funding proposals and is showing interest in legislation that would increase a tax paid by gas-station owners to pump more money into highway and bridge construction and repair, a top state senator told the Associated Press on Friday. Senate Transportation Committee Chairman John Rafferty, R-Montgomery, said he hopes to introduce a bill in January that will include input from key Republicans and Democrats in the House and Senate, as well as the governor.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Beth DeFalco, Associated Press
DENVILLE, N.J. - The crowd was familiar and friendly, and Gov. Christie seemed to soak up the energy. Speaking in a charter school's packed gymnasium, the governor bragged that he had Democrats fighting with him not over spending money, but over cutting spending. "To have Democrats arguing with me about which taxes to cut, I feel like I have died and gone to heaven," the governor said at his town hall at Morris County School of Technology in his home county. He noted that despite cutting education money, test scores in the state remained high overall.
NEWS
April 2, 1999 | By Tomoeh Murakami, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
About 50 residents gathered last night to hear about a $15.3 million municipal budget that would require a 26 percent tax increase. The proposed 1999-2000 budget, while only $362,781 more than last year's, would mean an increase in local taxes of $1.5 million. The budget has been revised during 20 hours of council workshops. If it is adopted, the owner of a home assessed at the township average of $90,871 would pay about $167 more a year in taxes. The annual amount paid per $100 of assessed property value would jump from 68 to 86 cents.
NEWS
April 15, 2010
WHATEVER happened to freedom of choice? I choose to drink soda and ice tea, so you're going to tax me because it makes you fat? What is good for you? The air we breathe is bad, with all these chemicals floating around. You want to make money for the city? Legalize prostitution and drugs, then regulate and tax the heck out of them. You have these cathouses (sorry, spas) all over the city making tons of money with nothing done to shut them down, so someone has their hand in the cookie jar. I know drugs are addictive, but aren't alcohol and cigarettes?
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | By Laurie Kalmanson, Special to The Inquirer
After two hours of debate, the Gloucester County freeholders tabled and rejected the two most controversial issues - a change in government and taxes - presented at last night's meeting. When Republican freeholder candidate Philip James Donohue asked the board to create a commission to study the county government, John R. Maier, the Democratic freeholder director, allowed a debate and then announced that there would be no vote. "I'm not entertaining the motion," Maier said when the debate wore itself out. "That's my prerogative.
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