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Tax

NEWS
November 6, 1988 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here's one scene that has been repeated time and again at local meetings throughout Chester County: A developer presents plans for construction and promises that the project will be good for tax ratables. Local officials, starved for new revenues to support the weight of their sometimes bloated budgets, gobble up the promise. But as this year's budget planning season reaches its peak, local officials throughout the county are questioning the wisdom of rapid development as a means to generate revenue and keep taxes for residents to a minimum.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
The Clifton Heights Borough Council has tabled an ordinance that would tax vacant properties after a Walnut Avenue resident blistered the proposal, saying it sounded as if the borough was "half-boarded up. " The resident, Mary Quinn, said newspaper articles about the ordinance had given the borough a bad image that is damaging property values. "I resent the implication (by council's action) that Clifton Heights is as bad as Philadelphia," she told the eight-member council at its business meeting Monday night.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a surprise move, the Borough Council tabled two proposed ordinances that would have offered tax breaks to homeowners and businesses that make improvements to their properties. The ordinances would have exempted property owners from higher assessments for five years after an improvement was made. James Wittmeyer, of 10th Street, urged council to defeat the proposal, calling it discriminatory. He said taxpayers who don't upgrade their properties will effectively pay higher taxes as a result of the exemptions.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
In January, the Republican Party swept the West Deptford Township Committee, gaining control after last year's election with a 4-1 majority. Committee members elected Frederick R. Marz, the first Republican mayor in 20 years. Marz is up for re-election to council this year, and he is the first to concede that this year has not been easy, even with the large Republican majority on the committee. First, there was the tax increase, then came the battle over the Verga Fire Company, a dispute that for months refused to be resolved and still is unsettled.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Beth DeFalco, Associated Press
DENVILLE, N.J. - The crowd was familiar and friendly, and Gov. Christie seemed to soak up the energy. Speaking in a charter school's packed gymnasium, the governor bragged that he had Democrats fighting with him not over spending money, but over cutting spending. "To have Democrats arguing with me about which taxes to cut, I feel like I have died and gone to heaven," the governor said at his town hall at Morris County School of Technology in his home county. He noted that despite cutting education money, test scores in the state remained high overall.
NEWS
March 16, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney's administration expects to see a 55 percent drop in consumption of sugary drinks in the first year should its controversial plan to tax them be approved. The sales drop-off estimated by the soda industry is 79 percent. Those competing projections also lead to different revenue estimates, numbers more than $150 million apart. The divide is important, considering the long list of projects Kenney hopes the tax will fund, including universal pre-kindergarten. When presented with the other's calculations, neither side is reaching for its erasers.
NEWS
February 14, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
President Clinton yesterday sent to Congress, and to an apparently bleak fate, his bills to increase the minimum wage and to lower middle-class taxes. He also used an Oval Office ceremony to announce plans for a new domestic economic conference and to assail Republicans for "digging the country into a hole" and then criticizing his budget. "It is time for them to take a little responsibility. They were here during the years of the '80s when we created this deficit problem," Clinton said.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
TOWER Investments Inc. owns more than 100 properties in Philadelphia, including The Piazza at Schmidt's and Liberties Walk, which are largely credited with the dramatic revitalization of parts of Northern Liberties, as well as Avenue North, which enhanced the burgeoning area around Temple University on North Broad Street. The other 100-plus properties we own across the city are in various stages of development. Tower Entertainment, another of my companies, hopes to be selected to develop the $700 million Provence Resort & Casino on the iconic former site of the Inquirer and Daily News . Of all this development activity that has reshaped the face of Philadelphia and generated thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in tax revenue for the city, the taxes due on one property - one - eluded our controller.
NEWS
March 30, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Here's a thought Pity Mayor Kenney didn't propose a tax on crooked politicians, judges, prosecutors, etc. That would be a gold mine for the city. |Mike Milliken, Drexel Hill
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Two measures dealing with issues that are key to any state budget deal - property taxes and pensions - began moving through the legislature Tuesday, with lawmakers pushing for swift action on both. The House began debate on a multibillion-dollar property-tax relief measure whose prospects are uncertain, while the Senate is poised to vote on a Republican-backed proposal to rein in the cost of public-employee pensions. Both bills are up for final passage Wednesday, after which legislators will break until June, when budget talks with Gov. Wolf will begin in earnest.
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