IN THE NEWS

Tax

NEWS
September 24, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
  HARRISBURG - In what essentially was a warm-up for Monday's gubernatorial debate, Democratic candidate Tom Wolf found himself playing defense on some of his key campaign positions. Speaking before a packed crowd at the monthly Pennsylvania press club luncheon Monday, Wolf reiterated his position that he would boost education funding through a 5 percent tax on the extraction of natural gas from the Marcellus Shale. But he found himself having to explain his position on other issues, namely his idea of replacing the state's across-the-board personal income tax with a graduated tax. Wolf, a wealthy businessman from York, said he believes that would ease the tax burden on the middle class and shift the burden to wealthier taxpayers.
NEWS
September 23, 2014
VOTERS won't be seeing a referendum question on abolishing the School Reform Commission on November's ballot, since City Council had too short a time between passing the resolution last week and the deadline for inclusion; the bill is still on Mayor Nutter's desk, waiting for a signature. Maybe it will appear in May, but voters should pay attention now to what they'll see - and won't see. They may see a nonbinding vote saying something like, "Should Philadelphia abolish the SRC?"
SPORTS
September 23, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Cary Williams is tired and says he isn't the only one. The Eagles cornerback isn't tired from the games. He's tired from the daily grind of practice and the pace coach Chip Kelly demands when the team is preparing. Williams made his assertion that the coaching staff didn't look out for the well-being of the players on an afternoon when the Eagles pulled out another crazy win to improve to 3-0, and an afternoon in which the highlight play of the day for Washington came as former Eagles receiver DeSean Jackson beat Williams on a deep post route for an 81-yard touchdown.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania House could vote as early as Wednesday to authorize Philadelphia to impose a $2-per-pack tax on cigarettes to raise money for its cash-starved schools. The proposed tax had been caught in a legislative logjam since the summer, but appears on a fast track to Gov. Corbett's desk. The measure was approved Tuesday by the House Rules Committee, and is likely to be voted on by the full House on Wednesday or Monday. The bill would then be sent to the Senate, where legislative leaders have said it remains high on their priority list.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
With tens of millions of dollars and more than 1,000 Philadelphia School District jobs on the line, all eyes shifted to Harrisburg on Monday as lawmakers returned from their summer break. District leaders say they need a $2-per-pack cigarette tax passed quickly to help fill an $81 million deficit, and prevent mass layoffs and larger class sizes. Philadelphia officials said they would keep the pressure on high until the tax is passed. Mayor Nutter, a familiar face in the state Capitol in recent months, plans to travel to Harrisburg again this week.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Amy Worden and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - It's do-or-die for a new cigarette tax to help Philadelphia schools, as well as scores of other bills, when the state legislature returns from its summer break Monday. The fall legislative agenda is packed with bills touching on everything from public employee pensions to public records. Not only will it play out against the backdrop of a contentious election season, but it will also contend with a time crunch: Any bills that don't get approved this year will effectively die and have to be reintroduced come January, when a new two-year session begins.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie on Thursday asked the Legislature to beef up tax incentives for non-gambling projects in Atlantic City as part of an economic development bill. He conditionally vetoed the bill, passed by the Democratic-controlled Legislature in June, which would revise the state's economic incentive programs. Under Christie's revisions, non-gambling businesses in Atlantic City would be eligible for many of the same incentives as those in other poor cities, such as Camden. "Similar to Camden and other targeted cities in New Jersey that are in need of economic rejuvenation, I am recommending that non-gaming development projects and private-sector job growth in Atlantic City be eligible for the strongest possible incentives," Christie wrote in his conditional veto message.
NEWS
September 9, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE GUARDIAN Civic League, which has championed the rights of Philadelphia's black police officers since 1956, has had its tax-exempt status revoked for failing to file required forms, and it could owe the federal government nearly $100,000 in penalties. The IRS filed a $99,787.25 tax lien against the league in May, after yanking its nonprofit status in January because league officials haven't filed tax paperwork since 2010, according to the IRS and the Pennsylvania Department of State.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY MICHELE TRANQUILLI, Daily News Staff Writer tranqum@phillynews.com, 215-854-2348
THE DEADLINE to apply for a homestead exemption on your property taxes is Sept. 13, yet thousands of Philadelphia homeowners have not applied and may miss out on big savings. If you're unfamiliar with the tax break, here are some answers: Q: What is a homestead exemption? A: The homestead exemption shaves $30,000 off the assessed value of your property and your tax bill is calculated from the lower amount. With the exemption, a house assessed at $100,000 in Philadelphia, for example, would be taxed on only $70,000, reducing the tax bill from $1,340 to $938.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The closure of three Atlantic City casinos by mid-September will wipe $2 billion from property-tax values next year, exacerbating the financial plight of the already cash-strapped city, Mayor Don Guardian warned Tuesday. By 2017, Guardian said on a conference call to discuss Atlantic City's way forward as a center of tourism, property values are expected to have fallen as low as $7.5 billion, from $20 billion five years ago. In the short term, Guardian said, the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs has made money "available for some bridge loans to make sure that the city continues functioning with this year's budget because of any concern that we might have that a casino's closing, going bankrupt, might hold off payments.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|