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Taxi

ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Hana Saeidi, the bright young niece of Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi, climbs into the taxi that her uncle is driving on the streets of Tehran. She is holding a camera, excited about her first film class in school. Her teacher has provided a list of rules to make a "distributable" movie. Among the key rules: "No sordid realism. " In the small and brilliant Jafar Panahi's Taxi , the internationally renowned director has been reduced to making his own brand of "sordid realism" on the sly - that is, realism free of the restrictions of Sharia law. With a small camera mounted on the dashboard of a car, Panahi drives along, picking up passengers and recording them as they debate politics and religion, crime and punishment, Woody Allen and Akira Kurosawa.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1993 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony Teagle is just the kind of driver you want behind the wheel when you climb into a Philadelphia taxicab. A Southwest Philadelphia resident, Teagle has been a Yellow Cab driver for eight years. He likes his job and makes a good living at it. Over the years, driving a cab has enabled him to find his favorite parts of the city, and spot the home he now owns when it was for sale. He met his wife when she was a passenger in his taxi. Professional drivers such as Teagle are strong supporters of the new system that, effective last week, required Philadelphia cabbies to be certified and to display photo-identification cards in their vehicles.
NEWS
January 10, 1994
Tugging on the broken armrest, avoiding wires poking through a hole in the door and bracing as the taxi begins to careen down an icy city street - your average, long-suffering taxi patron just might think, hey, maybe that strike by Philadelphia cabbies wouldn't be such a bad thing after all. Of course, that's hardly the intended impact of the protest planned for Saturday. Several hundred drivers say they're unhappy over new fees for cabbies who work Philadelphia International Airport, and they intend, as one driver said, to "shut this city down" to make their point.
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | By Laura J. Bruch, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You figure there's a problem when one of the city's top tourism officials steps into a taxi - and it's missing a door handle. Or when a cabbie dumps a corporate executive after only two blocks - because he saw someone else with luggage who could mean a higher fare. Or when a conventioneer here in February gets charged $26 to go to the First Union Spectrum and $8 to return. What a difference a change of direction can make in the city that loves you back! Nine years after a new medallion system was created to ensure that all taxis were properly inspected and safe for passengers, it may be time for another tune-up.
NEWS
August 11, 2002 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four people, including a 4-month-old boy, were injured yesterday when a taxicab careened into a crowd of shoppers at a busy Germantown supermarket. Police said Simon Hextall, a driver for Penn Cab Co., lost control of his vehicle in the parking lot of the Pathmark supermarket, near Wayne and Chelten Avenues, shortly after noon. The cab crossed the lot, jumped the curb, flattened metal barrier pylons, and crushed several shopping carts before stopping. Hextall was questioned, but no charges have been filed against him, police said.
NEWS
April 16, 2001 | By Andrea Gerlin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Campbell's large, stylized London taxi is quite the marketing vehicle. As he plies the city streets in his cab, which has been shrink-wrapped to look like a mobile version of the South African flag, his goal is to hook not just passengers en route to their next destination but also people planning trips abroad. Once they're in the backseat - and a captive audience - he goes to work. "Have you ever been to South Africa?" Campbell began one afternoon last week, after Sean Pickering hopped in near St. James Park.
NEWS
September 16, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Three Florida executives stranded in Chicago during the airport shutdowns last week found an unusual way to get home: They took a taxi. The driver, who introduced himself as Ali, took pity on them and agreed to make the 24-hour trip because he wanted to help the men return to their families, said Bruce Gross, chief financial officer for Lennar Corp. in Miami. They left at 10 p.m. Wednesday, with Ali driving the Mazda minivan until 5 a.m., when they finally switched drivers.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER CONVENTION BUREAU
She calls herself Gwendolyn. She prowls a sidewalk in a shadowy west-side warehouse district, hoping to fulfill the desires of the men leaving a trendy strip club nearby. She tells them what she thinks they want to hear. If they are ugly, she calls them cute. If they are fat, she admires their muscles. And for the thousands of Democrats who will descend on Madison Square Garden this week for the party's national convention, she's willing to appeal to their political loyalties - if that's what it takes.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city plans to award a newly formed taxi association the exclusive right to pick up passengers at Philadelphia International Airport, city aviation officials said yesterday. The plan promises to help improve what is often dismal airport cab service, Aviation Director James C. DeLong said. It's also intended to save the city hundreds of thousands of dollars. Metro-Care Inc., the firm that now runs SEPTA's Paratransit service for the handicapped, would operate the new association under a contract with the city.
NEWS
December 23, 1997 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Three people were killed yesterday afternoon in a head-on crash involving a taxi and station wagon on Route 322 near Foulk Road, authorities said. The victims were identified as Christopher J. Fairfield, 37, of Secane, who was driving a 1986 Volvo taxi, and Roger N. Morrill, 72, and his passenger, Bernice E. Riegel, 77, both of Wilmington, who were in the station wagon, a 1989 Oldsmobile. The Oldsmobile, driven by Morrill, was headed west on Route 322 approaching Garnet Mine Road when it drifted into the eastbound lane about 3:15 p.m., state police said.
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