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Tchaikovsky

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC Karl Stark, Sam Wood and Dennis Romero contributed
Pierre Monteux had an enormous repertoire, but French scores and those by Stravinsky are more often associated with this eminent conductor than the music of Tchaikovsky. Now, a previously unreleased two-CD set of Tchaikovsky performances by Monteux and the London Symphony (Vanguard Classics OVC 8031/2 1/2) offers a welcome opportunity to experience the French conductor's unabashed lyricism and interpretive zeal. Monteux recorded Tchaikovsky's famous Symphony No. 5 with the Boston and Hamburg Symphonies, but the later London interpretation is especially fascinating for its high-level intensity and conviction.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Friction, some slight abrasive edge, may be the quality that makes music stay in the memory and survive in the repertoire. At least, music that has no rough aesthetic edges at all seems to be at greater risk of leaving the memory and being dropped from the repertoire than less bland pieces. The theory is worth applying to Tchaikovsky's last opera, Yolanta. If ever there were music without an edge, or even a shadow, it is Yolanta. Difficult to stage because of its literary sweetness and unbroken chain of softly gleaming songs reflecting the opera's total lack of dramatic abrasions, the work probably works best on records.
NEWS
July 19, 1993 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Every Monday in July, this column features a detailed concertgoer's guide to the summer Philadelphia Orchestra concerts at the Mann Music Center. THIS WEEK'S CONDUCTORS: Mann artistic director Charles Dutoit will lead the Monday and Wednesday concerts, with Erich Kunzel, music director of the Cincinnati Pops, helming the annual pops concert on Thursday. TONIGHT MUSIC TO BE PLAYED: Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 (1875). ABOUT THE MUSIC: The horn's opening measures and the leaping piano chords frame the famous pop-tune melody, played for a while then never heard again.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Under many circumstances, the Philadelphia Orchestra's St. Petersburg Festival might seem like a desperate attempt to coax music lovers out of their warm homes and into the Kimmel Center with programs that dip deep into Russian crowd-pleasing repertoire, such as a suite from The Nutcracker . Yet on Thursday, the first installment of this multiweek festival more than pulled its artistic weight, thanks to thoughtfully positioned Tchaikovsky and...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia Orchestra flung Tchaikovsky into the teeth of the booming gale Monday, beginning its final week of outdoor concerts with thunder, lightning and cannon shots. Charles Dutoit conducted the showy program for the largest crowd of the season. Fireworks promised for after the 1812 Overture helped to swell the crowd past the 10,000 mark. The all-Tchaikovsky program was shaped to build to the climax of the overture, in which the finale was livened by Paul Burnett and his trained cannon.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Tchaikovsky was unstoppable at the Philadelphia Orchestra's return Tuesday to the Mann Center for the Performing Arts in the annual 1812 Overture performance with fireworks, though the program was curtailed due to the violent thunderstorm that hit two hours before concert time. After an early-evening power failure, Peco restored the lights - lots of them, along with a trio of new video screens in the rear lawn - although only for a limited time, pending the rebooting necessary for repairs elsewhere in the area.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The less you see in Tchaikovsky's Iolanta , the more the opera has to offer - and not because the plot revolves around a blind-from-birth princess. So anybody disappointed at the semi-staged production at the Curtis Opera Theatre at Prince Music Theater this weekend should know that this lovely little opera has much to say beyond its immediate story. Although it came from the great period of Tchaikovsky's creativity that gave birth to Symphony No. 6, Iolanta tends to slip through the cracks.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra is holding a Tchaikovsky celebration - but how can you tell? The Russian composer figures heavily into every orchestra season, downtown and at the Mann. Still, it is always a good time to dust off forgotten items from the far corners of his catalogue, and the orchestra, in its three-week Tchaikovsky festival, responded by performing, well, none of them. This was presumably conceived as a chance to sell some tickets in a repertoire the ensemble plays very well.
NEWS
June 8, 1988 | By JOAN DEPAUL, Daily News Staff Writer
It's been almost a year since the Pennsylvania Ballet Company and the Milwaukee Ballet joined forces to create the Pennsylvania and Milwaukee Ballet. The combining of the two companies in March 1987 formalized a relationship that had existed for years. Tonight, with the production of "Swan Lake" at the Academy of Music, the two companies mark a sort of anniversary, the completion of their first year of marriage. For members of the company, it's been an unusual time. They are working under a 52-week contract, rather than the more common 30-40 weeks.
NEWS
July 28, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra's annual Tchaikovsky Spectacular at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts can't help but have a singular audience dynamic: Many came more to see than to hear Monday (even if they did more hearing than seeing), which was obvious from the many empty seats inside and crowded lawn outside. But rather than letting the concert become a less-than-vital waiting game for the climactic fireworks, conductor Rossen Milanov set the tone for gracious attentiveness in the audience of 7,800, even though what led up to the inevitable 1812 Overture wasn't all light-ish show pieces.
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NEWS
August 28, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
Summer symphony audiences are supposed to be easy. Just give them pleasant weather, a nice picnic, craft beer, the 1812 Overture with a few cannons . . . If only. Summer audiences can be more easily discouraged by weather than, say, regular season crowds at the Philadelphia Orchestra. And summer crowds, for example, don't take as well to reruns as you might think. Not even the 1812 Overture , cannons blasting, is fail-safe. So summer concert presenters are looking for new ways to attract and hold audiences.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
PURCHASE, N.Y. - Is some sort of ultra-repetitive Philip Glass piece being rehearsed behind closed doors at the State University of New York at Purchase music building? Or are musicians practicing their scales with a go-for-broke aggression? National Youth Orchestra 2, formed this year under the auspices of Carnegie Hall's Weill Music Institute, has teenagers from around the country learning their professional craft with some of the busiest members of the Philadelphia Orchestra. "They're getting a chance to work in ways that they wouldn't in their home town," said Philadelphia Orchestra bassist Joe Conyers, who is particularly keen to work with what's called the URC contingent - students from under-represented communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2016 | Staff
June starts soon, and it's time to start planning ahead. Here are five events to look forward to next month. Wizard World Comic Con Thousands converge on the city for Wizard World, Philadelphia's annual convention of all things geeky. There's a Back to the Future reunion (Michael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd) and a convocation of stars from the Marvel universe (think Captain America 's Chris Evans, Thor 's Chris Hemsworth, and Agent Carter 's Hayley Atwell)
NEWS
April 24, 2016
1 p.m. Sunday on WRTI-FM (90.1): Famed composer/conductor Michael Tilson Thomas steps in for the ailing James Levine and conducts the Philadelphia Orchestra in Charles Ives' "Decoration Day" from A Symphony: New England Holidays , and Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 2 , the so-called Little Russian.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Among the things I've discovered at the orchestra over the years is that a good way to engage your seat mate is to say that the next piece is about a man punished by strapping him naked to the back of a horse and sending him through the countryside. Fortunately, on Thursday night, this was actually the case. It might be surprising, but Franz Liszt's Mazeppa , inspired by the Victor Hugo poem, ends happily, which the Philadelphia Orchestra did, too, performing the tone poem for the first time since 1983.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
A 20-year-old Curtis Institute of Music student is the top winner of the venerable International Tchaikovsky Competition in the violin category. Yu-Chien "Benny" Tseng won the silver medal, second prize, in the Moscow competition, whose results were announced Wednesday. No gold award was given this year, which is not unusual. The Taipei-born violinist came to Curtis in 2008, and the following summer, at age 14, played Vivaldi's The Four Seasons with the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Mann Center.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Tchaikovsky was unstoppable at the Philadelphia Orchestra's return Tuesday to the Mann Center for the Performing Arts in the annual 1812 Overture performance with fireworks, though the program was curtailed due to the violent thunderstorm that hit two hours before concert time. After an early-evening power failure, Peco restored the lights - lots of them, along with a trio of new video screens in the rear lawn - although only for a limited time, pending the rebooting necessary for repairs elsewhere in the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In a somewhat unconventional program, Yannick Nézet-Séguin led the Philadelphia Orchestra through the lighter side of Shostakovich - assuming there actually is one. Even when the composer seems to be kidding around, his music hints at something subversive, that the music means much more than it says, and what it says is always dangling out of reach. That's why you want to hear it again. The objects of curiosity Wednesday at the Kimmel Center were Shostakovich's seldom-heard Piano Concerto No. 2 and music for the film The Gadfly - paired with Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 - creating a provocative conclusion to the St. Petersburg Festival that could have been less convincing had performances not been so purposeful.
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