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Tea Room

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NEWS
July 15, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Why I found myself motoring down Berkley Road in Devon is not particularly important, though it had to do with the offer of one of those tilted copper bowls they use to whisk the puffy omelettes (French souffles, almost) on Mont Saint-Michel. Anyway, it was lunch time not long after I picked it up, and off to my right about midway between the back side of the Devon Horse Show grounds and the front of the Whole Foods on Lancaster Avenue, I encountered a modest tea room called A Taste of Britain.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jim and Karen Darch still face a lot of work before they can open the gourmet coffeehouse they've planned for years. Last month, they bought an abandoned, two-story newsstand on High Street east of Route 130. Once known as Sam's Newsstand, a neighborhood cigar shop and candy store, the 1920s-era structure has the charm the Darches sought for their cafe, which will feature live jazz, a bistro menu and a Victorian tea room. "We had been looking at a strip mall, but we didn't want that kind of feel," Karen Darch said.
REAL_ESTATE
November 8, 1998 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jane Ruth gets fresh eggs every morning from her farmer neighbor. They go into the breakfasts and lunches she serves at her Lederach General Store Tea Room in Lower Salford Township. People come from miles around to dine at the tea room in Lederach, one of four villages in the 14-square-mile Montgomery County township. Ruth has operated the tea room for 10 years in what was once one of three general stores where Route 113 and Morris, Cross, Old Skippack and Salfordville Roads come together.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At Marcine Davis' new shop, you can buy a posy, sip a cup of fresh-brewed tea, or get a foot rub. The multi-faceted establishment, called It's Easy Being Green, will host a grand opening in two weeks. It calls a converted house on North Hills Avenue home. The ground floor has three small rooms running from the front to the back of the building. Enter from the front porch and you are greeted by baskets overflowing with blooms and greenery. Next is the tea room, furnished with small tables and chairs picked up at garage sales.
NEWS
February 7, 2006 | By Nora Schreiber McDonough
As Strawbridge's final days loom, memories of the old Strawbridge and Clothier fill my mind. Of course, to me it was never the same after the 145-year-old chain dropped the "Clothier" from its name more than a decade ago. The days of special clothes and style were gone, replaced with the same things you could get at any retail store in any mall in any town. Does anyone else remember when that marvelous concrete castle on Old York Road was the Strawbridge and Clothier building in Jenkintown?
NEWS
April 15, 1996 | By Terence Samuel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The final safeguard between the American people and mornings spoiled by truly bad cups of tea had to forget a few things her mother taught her. She had to learn how to slurp forcefully and how to spit in public without embarrassment. This is Faith Lim's fate. But, by an act of Congress, not for long. For more than 20 years, in a tiny corner of a sprawling warehouse in north Brooklyn, she has been tasting tea for the government, making sure that imported tea - nearly 200 million pounds each year - is suitable for U.S. consumption.
NEWS
April 21, 2002 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Cricket was introduced to this area at Haverford College in 1834. William Carville, an English gardener employed by the college, organized the intramural match, according to an article in The First 300: The Amazing and Rich History of Lower Merion (The Lower Merion Historical Society, 2000). "We date cricket as an intercollegiate sport here at Haverford to 1864, when we played the University of Pennsylvania," said Greg Kannerstein, director of athletics at Haverford College.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Dressed in authentic woolen uniforms, a Union Army colonel and corporal and a lady camp follower in a long woolen dress set up tents in front of Chatham Park Elementary School in Havertown recently. Demonstrating handguns and rifles from the 1860s, they answered questions about what life was like in the 19th century. "It was an opportunity for the children to see what it was like in the 1800s and ask questions," said Lee Taylor, president of the Chatham Park Parent Teacher Organization who arranged for the re-enactors.
FOOD
March 26, 2009 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is tea and then there is Tea. There is bagged Lipton made in a coffee mug using the "hot" knob on the office water cooler; English-style afternoon tea served at the Four Seasons in delicate porcelain cups with a side of scones; hot tea with lemon to soothe a sore throat; iced tea for relief from the heat; and fine fresh-brewed tea from hand-picked leaves, savored by connoisseurs. And then there is Chanoyu , an ancient ceremony in which matcha green tea powder is brewed one cup at a time in a mindful manner practiced by early Shoguns and perfected by the 16th-century Zen Buddhist master, Sen no Rikyu (1522-1591)
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
Sheila Rose leaned forward slightly to show the two women the nearly two dozen assorted tea sandwiches on the silver tray. With silver tongs, Rose daintily picked up the miniature sandwich, placing it on a small china plate in front of one of the women. With that, the English custom of taking afternoon tea began. Not in England, however, but on the Main Line. Taking tea here is becoming trendy. Within the last year, two restaurants and one day spa have begun serving afternoon tea. Rose, formerly of England and now of Berwyn, handles the St. Davids Inn tea service, which began in January.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | Valerie Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
WHAT SHOULD Philadelphia do to locate deadbeat owners of vacant houses when so many people are in need of housing? Mayoral candidate T. Milton Street said he wouldn't bother looking for missing owners. "I'd move somebody in those houses and let the owners find me," said the former state senator and onetime squatter-movement leader. "I've done it. It works. " It was a response to one question asked near the end of a mayoral candidates forum sponsored by the Philadelphia Council for Community Advancement at the Crystal Tea Room yesterday.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  PHILADELPHIA Bring out the drag. Saturday night, the Crystal Tea Room will come alive with song and dance and wild wigs for the 15th annual Black-Tie GayBINGO, a fund-raiser for HIV/AIDS awareness and education. Makeovers will be auctioned, awards will be given, and the "Bingo Verifying Divas" will keep the audience on its toes through midnight. And there will be drag. Lots of it. "It's not going to be your grandmother's bingo night," said Robb Reichard, executive director of the Philadelphia AIDS Fund.
FOOD
March 26, 2009 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is tea and then there is Tea. There is bagged Lipton made in a coffee mug using the "hot" knob on the office water cooler; English-style afternoon tea served at the Four Seasons in delicate porcelain cups with a side of scones; hot tea with lemon to soothe a sore throat; iced tea for relief from the heat; and fine fresh-brewed tea from hand-picked leaves, savored by connoisseurs. And then there is Chanoyu , an ancient ceremony in which matcha green tea powder is brewed one cup at a time in a mindful manner practiced by early Shoguns and perfected by the 16th-century Zen Buddhist master, Sen no Rikyu (1522-1591)
NEWS
July 15, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Why I found myself motoring down Berkley Road in Devon is not particularly important, though it had to do with the offer of one of those tilted copper bowls they use to whisk the puffy omelettes (French souffles, almost) on Mont Saint-Michel. Anyway, it was lunch time not long after I picked it up, and off to my right about midway between the back side of the Devon Horse Show grounds and the front of the Whole Foods on Lancaster Avenue, I encountered a modest tea room called A Taste of Britain.
NEWS
February 7, 2006 | By Nora Schreiber McDonough
As Strawbridge's final days loom, memories of the old Strawbridge and Clothier fill my mind. Of course, to me it was never the same after the 145-year-old chain dropped the "Clothier" from its name more than a decade ago. The days of special clothes and style were gone, replaced with the same things you could get at any retail store in any mall in any town. Does anyone else remember when that marvelous concrete castle on Old York Road was the Strawbridge and Clothier building in Jenkintown?
NEWS
October 9, 2005 | Inquirer staff
What it is: A tearoom What we like about it: The tearoom ambience and the fare that accompanies it. Penelope's is on the ground floor of a larger antiques venue, and it is furnished in appropriately Victorian decor with innumerable collectibles, including tea sets and accoutrements. The menu thoughtfully explains the various kinds of teatime meals or snacks. The light tea includes a pot of tea, finger sandwiches, and a dessert. The sweet tea omits the sandwiches and gets right down to cakes and pastries.
NEWS
September 29, 2005 | By Leslie A. Pappas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cynthia Wahl notes the color, inhales the aroma, and sips. "Peach-like," she declares. With a fresh meadow fragrance, a clear amber color, and honey undertones. A sweet white wine, perhaps a Sauternes or Riesling? No, Wahl's elixir - and the basis for her Bucks County start-up - is not fine wine, but handpicked, full-leaf tea. "Filet mignon and ground beef come from the same cow, but they taste totally different," Wahl says. The same, she continues, is true of the tea leaf.
NEWS
April 21, 2002 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Cricket was introduced to this area at Haverford College in 1834. William Carville, an English gardener employed by the college, organized the intramural match, according to an article in The First 300: The Amazing and Rich History of Lower Merion (The Lower Merion Historical Society, 2000). "We date cricket as an intercollegiate sport here at Haverford to 1864, when we played the University of Pennsylvania," said Greg Kannerstein, director of athletics at Haverford College.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At Marcine Davis' new shop, you can buy a posy, sip a cup of fresh-brewed tea, or get a foot rub. The multi-faceted establishment, called It's Easy Being Green, will host a grand opening in two weeks. It calls a converted house on North Hills Avenue home. The ground floor has three small rooms running from the front to the back of the building. Enter from the front porch and you are greeted by baskets overflowing with blooms and greenery. Next is the tea room, furnished with small tables and chairs picked up at garage sales.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jim and Karen Darch still face a lot of work before they can open the gourmet coffeehouse they've planned for years. Last month, they bought an abandoned, two-story newsstand on High Street east of Route 130. Once known as Sam's Newsstand, a neighborhood cigar shop and candy store, the 1920s-era structure has the charm the Darches sought for their cafe, which will feature live jazz, a bistro menu and a Victorian tea room. "We had been looking at a strip mall, but we didn't want that kind of feel," Karen Darch said.
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