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Teacher Education

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NEWS
November 16, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
West Chester University has been chosen to participate in a national study of teacher education led by nationally known education researcher John I. Goodlad. Goodlad, author of A Place Called School, a 1984 book that examined the deficiencies in American education, has launched a study focusing on teacher education. Currently director of the Center for Educational Renewal at the University of Washington in Seattle, Goodlad is visiting West Chester University as part of his study.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
By Anne Reeves Pennsylvania's teacher-preparation programs were recently graded by a Washington group, but whether the state's colleges and universities earned high or low marks, these ratings deserve closer scrutiny. Two years ago, the National Council on Teacher Quality - partnering with U.S. News and World Report magazine in a bid for legitimacy - announced plans for a nationwide survey of teacher-preparation programs. Data collected through the survey would be used by NCTQ to rate teacher-education programs and provide "an accurate picture of the quality of teacher preparation today - and from there, to find ways to improve teacher preparation.
NEWS
April 26, 2016
ISSUE | U.S. CURRENCY Putting a relevant face on history I love that African American abolitionist and Underground Railroad leader Harriet Tubman will be on the front of the $20 bill, but Andrew Jackson should be removed entirely instead of put on the back ("Harriet Tubman's place of honor," Thursday). It's past time that history's rich diversity replaces the status quo: Anglo-Saxon, male faces. To those who claim that such changes are politically correct, I say the traditional telling of history has always been politically motivated.
LIVING
February 23, 1988 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beginning in 1990, the University of Pittsburgh no longer will award baccalaureate degrees in education. Instead, all prospective teachers will be required to major in the academic subjects they intend to teach. After graduation, they are to take a fifth year of graduate work that will focus exclusively on teaching skills. "It's a strategy for change (in teacher education) as much as it is a way to provide teachers with more subject-matter knowledge," explained Thomas J. LaBelle, dean of Pitt's School of Education, which now turns out about 250 elementary and secondary teachers a year.
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Armand J. Peartree, 91, of Spring House, formerly of Wynnewood, who had careers in real-estate development and education, died June 18 at the Fort Washington Estates medical facility in Upper Dublin. Mr. Peartree entered the real-estate field in 1929 and concentrated on residential property, home building and management until 1955, when he left to participate full time in what he called "community activity. " He and builder George Pasfield operated Peartree & Pasfield Inc. and developed parts of Devon, Gladwyne, Villanova and Wynnewood, primarily in the decade after World War II. In 1955, Mr. Peartree joined an education project sponsored by the Ford Foundation through Temple University's Graduate Education Department.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bonnie Lynn LaFave, 68, a former public school administrator in Galloway Township, Atlantic County, died of cancer Saturday, July 5, at her home in Margate, where she had lived since the early 1980s. Born in Camden, Ms. LaFave grew up in Westmont and Haddonfield and graduated from Atlantic City High School in 1963. She earned a bachelor's in education at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton in 1967 and a master's in education there in 1971, a cousin, Paul Bennett, said in an interview.
NEWS
September 14, 1998
Teacher hiring, teacher contracts, teacher respect I followed with interest the series regarding the debate about the attempts to improve teacher quality in our public schools ("Keys to the classroom," Sept. 2 and 3). As an honors graduate of a teacher education program and one who left the profession, perhaps I can contribute some constructive criticism and well-meaning advice to school districts and institutions of teacher education. In general, there are three glaring deficiencies inherent in teacher education programs: the inability of the colleges to effectively convey to the students the immense preparation necessary for becoming a skilled classroom teacher; the failure to offer successful strategies in the imperative techniques of classroom management; and the negligence in not including special-education classes as a requirement for all prospective graduates.
NEWS
August 24, 1987 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Glassboro State College, applications for postgraduate teacher education programs increased by about 20 percent over the last two years. In the education school at Trenton State College, the number of incoming students was 30 percent higher than last year. College students are showing a heightened interest in teacher education, according to officials at the two colleges, and a major reason is New Jersey's mandatory minimum salary of $18,500 for beginning teachers. "It's made beginning teachers sure they could support themselves," said Jack Davies, Glassboro's director of admissions.
NEWS
May 18, 1986 | By Alan Campbell
In 1910, a report on medical education in this country had, according to Encyclopedia Britannica, "an immediate and sensational impact. " The recommendations contained therein led to the development in the United States of a medical delivery system second to none in the world. The report was written by educator Abraham Flexner and financed by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Now, another Carnegie-financed report, this one on teaching as a profession, could have a similar impact in America's public schools.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
GLASSBORO The new dean of Rowan University's College of Education has a mandate: Find a mandate. By the end of the academic year, her goal is to establish a mission for the school as the university increases its research focus and seeks to rise to national prominence. "My question is, for Rowan, what's going to be our stamp on our graduates?" said Monika Shealey, 39, who became Rowan's education dean in July after three years as an associate dean and associate professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Education.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 26, 2016
ISSUE | U.S. CURRENCY Putting a relevant face on history I love that African American abolitionist and Underground Railroad leader Harriet Tubman will be on the front of the $20 bill, but Andrew Jackson should be removed entirely instead of put on the back ("Harriet Tubman's place of honor," Thursday). It's past time that history's rich diversity replaces the status quo: Anglo-Saxon, male faces. To those who claim that such changes are politically correct, I say the traditional telling of history has always been politically motivated.
NEWS
February 7, 2016
The School District of Philadelphia may lack proper funding, but the United States' eighth-largest public school system has never wanted for dedicated teachers. For many of the city's Cold War kids, Helen Cheyney Bailey stands at the front of the class. Born in Philadelphia and educated in its public schools, Bailey (1897-1978) initially dreamed of being a writer. A scholarship to Radcliffe College seemed to offer the Philadelphia High School for Girls graduate a chance at a life of letters.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bonnie Lynn LaFave, 68, a former public school administrator in Galloway Township, Atlantic County, died of cancer Saturday, July 5, at her home in Margate, where she had lived since the early 1980s. Born in Camden, Ms. LaFave grew up in Westmont and Haddonfield and graduated from Atlantic City High School in 1963. She earned a bachelor's in education at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton in 1967 and a master's in education there in 1971, a cousin, Paul Bennett, said in an interview.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
GLASSBORO The new dean of Rowan University's College of Education has a mandate: Find a mandate. By the end of the academic year, her goal is to establish a mission for the school as the university increases its research focus and seeks to rise to national prominence. "My question is, for Rowan, what's going to be our stamp on our graduates?" said Monika Shealey, 39, who became Rowan's education dean in July after three years as an associate dean and associate professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Education.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
By Anne Reeves Pennsylvania's teacher-preparation programs were recently graded by a Washington group, but whether the state's colleges and universities earned high or low marks, these ratings deserve closer scrutiny. Two years ago, the National Council on Teacher Quality - partnering with U.S. News and World Report magazine in a bid for legitimacy - announced plans for a nationwide survey of teacher-preparation programs. Data collected through the survey would be used by NCTQ to rate teacher-education programs and provide "an accurate picture of the quality of teacher preparation today - and from there, to find ways to improve teacher preparation.
NEWS
June 22, 2011
When it comes to U.S. history, quite a few adults may discover that they are smarter than a fifth grader. A nationwide report card released last week found that most fourth graders didn't even know why Abraham Lincoln was an important historical figure. Only 2 percent of 12th graders could explain the importance of the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision, even though the words "separate but equal" were in the question. Twelfth graders also had difficulty identifying China as North Korea's ally against American troops during the Korean War. The National Assessment of Educational Progress tests were given last year by the U.S. Department of Education to a sample of 32,000 students in the three grade levels enrolled in private and public schools.
NEWS
February 20, 2010 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sister Helen Thomas, the "hands-on" principal at St. Laurence Catholic School in Upper Darby, has brought technology to her school in a big way. Emilia Rastrick, a gym teacher at Lingelbach School in Philadelphia's Germantown section, launched a dragon-boat league to promote healthy lifestyles and cooperation among middle-school students. And Sherman Denby, a science teacher at the Cherry Street School in Bridgeton, N.J., quietly goes out of his way to help his low-income students and their families.
NEWS
February 20, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Valentine Udell, 93, of Perkiomenville, a teacher who helped direct summer camps in Montgomery County and was on the board of directors of the Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy, died of heart failure Jan. 20 at Pottstown Memorial Medical Center. Jon Udell, a nephew, said that Mr. Udell was attracted to outdoor life as a Boy Scout in junior high school and then in summers as a counselor at Camp SGF. A 1949 Inquirer report stated that the camp, named for its scoutmaster founder, Samuel G. Friedman, housed 130 low-income boys, two weeks at a time, in 15 cabins on 120 acres outside Phoenixville.
NEWS
May 1, 2009
THE "Call Me Mister" program highlights the idea that teachers of the same race as students will enhance learning. I call it a lot of dangerous "hogwash. " This program will foster segregation. Same color, gender, race or ethnicity will be taught together. I request that prospective teachers stop wasting their time and try to resolve some problems that will really influence and enhance a student's learning, like lack of school attendance, discipline, little or no classroom participation, drugs and little or no parent involvement in school activities and home motivation to do well in school.
NEWS
October 23, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sister Mary LaLande Drumm, 89, a professor emerita and former chairman of the education department at Immaculata University, died Thursday of Parkinson's disease at Camilla Hall, the retirement residence of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Immaculata. For 20 years, Sister LaLande served on the Immaculata faculty, and for 17 of those years, she was chairman of the education department. After becoming professor emerita in 1990, she was a research assistant to the dean of the College of Graduate Studies, and also coordinated library resources for the core curriculum until moving to Camilla Hall in 2002.
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