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Teacher Preparation

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NEWS
September 30, 2000 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State officials have given final approval to higher academic standards for prospective Pennsylvania teachers three years after Gov. Ridge first proposed the change. The standards require college students to have higher grade point averages and take more rigorous courses in the subjects they want to teach in order to graduate as certified teachers. The plan also raises admission standards for those who want to enter these programs. During the legislative review, schools of education expressed concern that some worthy future teachers would be deterred from the profession for want of a few decimal points on a grade point average.
NEWS
May 28, 2004
Re: "Teacher plans are infeasible," Currents, May 23: Matthew Miller's commentary on the problem of teacher quality in poor schools raises some old and new issues. The problem is how to attract and retain the best teachers for the most difficult schools. The main thing that is making teaching an attractive choice today is the dismal job market elsewhere. Teacher salary, however, still lags way behind other professions with similar requirements. And then there are the inequities in the historic funding formula for schools.
NEWS
April 15, 2000 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nation's second-largest teachers' union yesterday called for an overhaul in how new teachers are screened and prepared, including requiring that they pass a rigorous national licensure test. After a two-year study, the American Federation of Teachers advocated a major revamping of teacher education that would mean at least five years of preparation, require even prospective elementary teachers to major in an academic subject, and include far more clinical practice in schools.
NEWS
November 11, 2009 | By Jerry T. Jordan
Every new teacher wants to believe four years of college and a degree in education are sufficient preparation for the tough job of teaching. In reality, new teachers need better training and support on the job to succeed, especially in urban districts such as Philadelphia's. The Philadelphia Federation of Teachers is trying to bridge the gap between new teachers' theoretical knowledge and the demands of urban classrooms by offering its own professional development. The union developed an intensive induction program, Strong Beginnings, which provided 500 new teachers last summer with courses on classroom management, effective instruction, working with parents and communities, and more.
NEWS
July 21, 1998
Teaching, standards and improving the profession I find it puzzling that the suggestion in "A lesson in mediocrity: How teachers are trained and chosen" (Inquirer, July 12) for improving the profession is to eliminate all standards for teachers. How, I wonder, is this supposed to enhance teacher quality? The argument put forward by Sen. John Kerry (D., Mass.) and others is that because some teachers lack content-area knowledge, we can improve teaching by giving prospective teachers more content knowledge while eliminating teaching courses.
NEWS
July 19, 1999
Hiring good teachers is one of the most effective school reforms. So it's heartening that more college students are saying they aspire to be schoolteachers. The demand will be there, as the nation will need 2 million new teachers in the next decade. A 1998 survey of freshmen at 600 colleges, released by UCLA last week, reported that just over 10 percent said they want to teach. That's the highest percentage found in this annual survey since the early 1970s and nearly twice the low point, which came in 1982.
NEWS
October 22, 2002 | By Susan A. Cole
Education is one of those issues about which everyone is a self-perceived expert, even when starting sentences with "I'm not an expert, but . . . " I was contemplating this fact after a national education-reform organization asked me to comment as an "expert" on the quality of teaching in America. One of the questions I was asked was why, as a university president, I gave so much attention to issues related to the education of teachers. The answer to that question was simple.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Starting in September, plumbers and other trade and vocational workers can become teachers without ever going to college. New state requirements will allow vocational teachers to become certified on the job, not in a college classroom. The concept is not new. For years now, New Jersey has had a program in which people who want to teach can be hired to do that, as long as they have a bachelor's degree, pass a basic communications test and get special assistance in the first year of teaching.
NEWS
February 14, 1988 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calling new state teacher training requirements "condescending" and blaming the Pennsylvania Department of Education for setting unrealistic deadlines, school superintendents, teachers and administrators spoke out against the program during a two-hour meeting Tuesday at Lionville Junior High School. Under a new law, Act 178, passed by the state legislature in December 1986, every school district in Pennsylvania must this year write a detailed plan to provide teachers with up-to-date training in education methods or face losing all state funding.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Proposed changes in the National Teachers Examinations have brought favorable reviews from state and area school officials. Although the state only uses 11 of the NTE's 40 tests for teaching certification, officials approve of the proposed changes, which would test applicants on teaching skills gained during college rather than only on factual knowledge. Frederica Haas, director of the state's Bureau of Teacher Preparation and Certification, said the new tests would be better for identifying a potential teacher's skills.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By John Mooney, NJ SPOTLIGHT
In what is billed as another way to improve teacher quality, the Christie administration wants to require would-be teachers to have at least a B average. Regulations that would raise the required college grade point average (GPA) of new teachers to 3.0, the equivalent of a B, were proposed Wednesday by state Education Commissioner Chris Cerf. The current minimum is 2.75, although at least half of the state's teacher education programs already require a 3.0 for both enrollment and graduation.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey is partnering with a foundation to recruit and train as many as 100 new math and science teachers to spend three years in high-need schools across the state, including ones in Camden and Pemberton Borough. The initiative, announced Friday by Gov. Christie, will cost $9 million, all of it donated. Teaching recruits will have backgrounds in science, technology, engineering and math - the so-called STEM subjects - and will be trained in a model created by the Princeton-based Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation emphasizing teacher preparation and retention.
NEWS
November 11, 2009 | By Jerry T. Jordan
Every new teacher wants to believe four years of college and a degree in education are sufficient preparation for the tough job of teaching. In reality, new teachers need better training and support on the job to succeed, especially in urban districts such as Philadelphia's. The Philadelphia Federation of Teachers is trying to bridge the gap between new teachers' theoretical knowledge and the demands of urban classrooms by offering its own professional development. The union developed an intensive induction program, Strong Beginnings, which provided 500 new teachers last summer with courses on classroom management, effective instruction, working with parents and communities, and more.
NEWS
September 5, 2009 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Negotiations in the North Penn School District, Montgomery County's largest, broke off yesterday, leaving in doubt the opening of school Tuesday for 12,700 students. With no negotiations scheduled, the union said last night that teachers "will not be in their classrooms" unless new talks occur. The union, whose contract for 1,070 members expired Tuesday, accused the board of taking action that would result in a lockout. The board said in a statement that any work stoppage would be illegal unless the union gives the 48-hour strike notice required by law. Before talks ended yesterday, the board had offered a two-year contract with pay raises of 2.4 percent in the first year and 3.0 percent in the second, but the union said that was not enough.
NEWS
September 1, 2006 | By Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Radnor Township School District teachers will go on strike one week from today unless they and the school board reach a contract settlement. The two sides talked until 3 a.m. yesterday without reaching an agreement, particularly on salary and benefits. Although no further talks had been set up as of last evening, representatives from both the district and the teachers' union said they hoped to find a solution before the teachers' deadline. "We are looking forward to resolving it before the 8th, averting a strike," said district spokeswoman Laurie Smith Wood.
NEWS
May 28, 2004
Re: "Teacher plans are infeasible," Currents, May 23: Matthew Miller's commentary on the problem of teacher quality in poor schools raises some old and new issues. The problem is how to attract and retain the best teachers for the most difficult schools. The main thing that is making teaching an attractive choice today is the dismal job market elsewhere. Teacher salary, however, still lags way behind other professions with similar requirements. And then there are the inequities in the historic funding formula for schools.
NEWS
August 29, 2003 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A union representing 174 teachers in the Springfield Township School District in Montgomery County has announced its intention to strike on Tuesday, the first day of school, if talks do not yield a new wage-and-benefits pact. In a statement released yesterday, the union leadership said its plan was to give a formal 48 hours' notice of a strike to district leaders sometime today. A strike would delay the start of classes for about 2,000 students in the district, though state law would limit picketing to no more than about four weeks before teachers would be required to return to classes.
NEWS
April 9, 2003 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A small piece of the Philadelphia School District's new "war curriculum" created to help teachers address the Iraq conflict has spawned a little war of its own - and has even created a split in the Jewish community. Several Jewish groups and officials, including the Anti-Defamation League and the Zionist Organization of America, have complained to the district for including an article that they say presents biased, inaccurate and inflammatory views about Israel. Among the material found objectionable was a poem by a Palestinian that said in part: "And yet, if I were to become hungry, I shall eat the flesh of my usurper.
NEWS
October 22, 2002 | By Susan A. Cole
Education is one of those issues about which everyone is a self-perceived expert, even when starting sentences with "I'm not an expert, but . . . " I was contemplating this fact after a national education-reform organization asked me to comment as an "expert" on the quality of teaching in America. One of the questions I was asked was why, as a university president, I gave so much attention to issues related to the education of teachers. The answer to that question was simple.
NEWS
September 30, 2000 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State officials have given final approval to higher academic standards for prospective Pennsylvania teachers three years after Gov. Ridge first proposed the change. The standards require college students to have higher grade point averages and take more rigorous courses in the subjects they want to teach in order to graduate as certified teachers. The plan also raises admission standards for those who want to enter these programs. During the legislative review, schools of education expressed concern that some worthy future teachers would be deterred from the profession for want of a few decimal points on a grade point average.
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