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Teacher Training

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NEWS
February 25, 1988 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Students in the Southeast Delco School District may get some additional time off during the 1988-89 school year thanks to a proposal that would require teachers to attend a two-hour, in-service session one morning each month. At a school board committee meeting Monday night, Superintendent William C. Donato recommended that kindergarten through 12th-grade classes be delayed by two hours once a month so that teachers could attend the training sessions. If the proposal is approved by the board, classes will be delayed on the first Wednesday of each month, except in September and June.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
The New Hope-Solebury School District has won two grants for teacher training, and the folks at the school board meeting Monday were mighty pleased about it. In fact, district parents, residents and teachers who were at the meeting burst into a loud round of applause when Superintendent Irene Bender announced the district would receive a $25,000 grant from the Coalition of Essential Schools and a $7,400 Lead Teacher Grant from the state....
NEWS
February 14, 1988 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calling new state teacher training requirements "condescending" and blaming the Pennsylvania Department of Education for setting unrealistic deadlines, school superintendents, teachers and administrators spoke out against the program during a two-hour meeting Tuesday at Lionville Junior High School. Under a new law, Act 178, passed by the state legislature in December 1986, every school district in Pennsylvania must this year write a detailed plan to provide teachers with up-to-date training in education methods or face losing all state funding.
NEWS
December 22, 1996 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Little did Walter Carroll know that when he wrote the borough's school into his will in the late 1940s, his words would be causing administrators half a century later to run to the courts. And while there is no doubt among residents and administrators here that the Carroll educational trust fund is the best thing to hit the district in years, its terms have caused some mighty confusion, and some rather heated debate. The latest legal question is how the fund money is spent - and, more specifically, whether it is benefiting the students, as Carroll intended it to. At issue is whether part of the money has been unfairly used in the last decade to fund teacher-training sessions.
NEWS
January 18, 1999
Throughout most of American history, public education has been revered as the mechanism to a better life: the pathway to equality of opportunity and the catalyst for understanding - and then ending - historic inequities between Americans of different races. And most Americans still have deep faith in the power of education and its connection to equity, polls show. But inequities in funding and teacher training that disproportionately affect minority and impoverished children threaten that faith.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A comprehensive study of technology in the nation's schools released yesterday found that Pennsylvania and New Jersey schools are lagging behind national averages in such key areas as the ratio of students to computers and technology training for teachers. The report, by the Educational Testing Service, the private educational testing institution based in Princeton, also found that, nationwide, poor and minority students have less access to computers than their wealthy and middle-class counterparts.
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN More than 200 protesters marched into the Camden school board meeting Tuesday night, chanting "Save our schools" and carrying signs, to protest ongoing and expected changes to the district. The group, organized by the teachers union, the Camden Education Association, and Save Our Schools New Jersey, was mostly teachers but included some students and parents, who held signs reading "Education Is Not for Sale" and "Layoffs Hurt. " They chanted from their seats while the board met in closed session, breaking into calls of "Please start the meeting" around the 90-minute mark.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN A school district ranked one of the worst in New Jersey showed flat or slightly improved student test scores last year. Camden schools, taken over by the state in June, improved in language arts from 19 to 21 percent of pupils scoring at or above the state-mandated proficiency level. Math scores stayed at 30 percent, according to data for the 2012-13 school year released last week. There were signs of moderate progress in individual schools. Statewide, six of the schools with the most improved test scores in specific grade-level subjects were in Camden, including Freedom Academy Charter School, which was slated to close because of its failing test scores two years ago. Five of the six schools that showed the most improvement still failed, scoring below 50 percent proficiency in math, language arts, or both, according to results of the N.J. Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (ASK)
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
Amid controversy over its cost and merits, Superintendent David Hornbeck has received big bucks to support a massive school-reform plan. A $13.5 million grant from the William Penn Foundation was announced yesterday during a press conference at Andrew Hamilton School in West Philadelphia. With this grant, the School District will have raised $85 million towards the $100 million it needs to collect $50 million from philanthropist Walter Annenberg. The grant is the largest the foundation has ever given.
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NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN More than 200 protesters marched into the Camden school board meeting Tuesday night, chanting "Save our schools" and carrying signs, to protest ongoing and expected changes to the district. The group, organized by the teachers union, the Camden Education Association, and Save Our Schools New Jersey, was mostly teachers but included some students and parents, who held signs reading "Education Is Not for Sale" and "Layoffs Hurt. " They chanted from their seats while the board met in closed session, breaking into calls of "Please start the meeting" around the 90-minute mark.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN A school district ranked one of the worst in New Jersey showed flat or slightly improved student test scores last year. Camden schools, taken over by the state in June, improved in language arts from 19 to 21 percent of pupils scoring at or above the state-mandated proficiency level. Math scores stayed at 30 percent, according to data for the 2012-13 school year released last week. There were signs of moderate progress in individual schools. Statewide, six of the schools with the most improved test scores in specific grade-level subjects were in Camden, including Freedom Academy Charter School, which was slated to close because of its failing test scores two years ago. Five of the six schools that showed the most improvement still failed, scoring below 50 percent proficiency in math, language arts, or both, according to results of the N.J. Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (ASK)
NEWS
June 25, 2013
Teachers rightly complain they are too often blamed for every shortcoming in America's public schools today. It certainly is not teachers' fault that too many schools, especially in big cities, are inadequately funded and staffed to produce the results expected of them. It's also not teachers' fault when colleges gladly pocket education students' tuition and send them out with diplomas and certificates that perpetuate the lie that they are classroom ready. That reality has been corroborated by a new report from the National Council on Teacher Quality that gives high marks to only 9 percent of America's collegiate teacher training programs.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teacher education programs at many universities - from state schools to some of the nation's most elite colleges - fall woefully short in preparing teachers for the classroom, according to a report by a Washington-based teacher quality group released Monday. Locally, Rutgers-Camden, St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia, Gwynedd-Mercy College in Gwynedd Valley, and Arcadia University in Glenside were among only 9 percent of college programs nationwide that fared well in the study by the National Council on Teacher Quality.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Megan Rogers, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - New standards that would require high school seniors to pass multiple exams in order to graduate could be coming to a school district near you. The administration recently delayed implementing the controversial "Common Core" standards, which specify what students should be expected to learn by certain grades, but education officials say Gov. Corbett wants to have them in place by fall. The standards are a voluntary initiative adopted by 45 states that establish a single set of educational requirements for kindergarten through 12th grade in English, language arts, and mathematics.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Christopher Moraff
Last week, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal signed the nation's most expansive school voucher program into law. Since the GOP sweep of statehouses in 2010, similar measures have been introduced by the legislatures of more than 30 states — including Pennsylvania, where a bipartisan school voucher bill was defeated in the House in December. Few doubt that there is a crisis in America's public schools. But focusing so much attention on where money is spent — instead of how — oversimplifies a complex problem.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 250 teachers from public and private schools in the Philadelphia area, and from Pittsburgh and other cities, gathered at the National Constitution Center on Sunday for a two-hour discussion about the state of teaching and education, part of a national conversation called "Education Nation. " With little electronic clickers that registered their choices on certain topics, 48 percent of the teachers in the Constitution Center's Kimmel Theater voted that merit pay for teachers should "in some way" be based on student performance - a middle-ground selection that also included choices of "completely" and "not at all. " They also chose poverty and family issues, plus lack of student motivation, as the biggest hindrances to learning; and from a list of five responses, they voted that teachers could perform better if they had more time to work with and learn from colleagues and had additional technology.
NEWS
March 30, 2010 | By Allison Kimmich
I confess: I dread this time of year. It might sound strange coming from the executive director of the National Women's Studies Association, but Women's History Month reminds me of our education system's failures. At home, I help my elementary school-age children assemble projects with such titles as "Important Women in History" or "A Woman I Admire. " We search the Internet for information that's not in their textbooks and assemble it on poster board. It comes home from school with "great job" penciled on the back and goes in the recycling bin. At work, I field e-mail requests from middle- and high-school students assigned to interview experts on female portrayals in film, women in American politics, and so on. I have come up with an equation for this time of year: incomplete textbooks + inadequate teacher training = poster board + interview requests.
NEWS
October 30, 2009
As aging baby boomers retire from the classroom, there should be plenty of newly trained teachers coming up to replace them. By 2014, the country's 95,000 public schools will need to hire as many as a million teachers and principals. More than half will be trained at education colleges. But will they be prepared for the classroom? Probably not, shortchanging another generation of the high-quality education they deserve. U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan has sounded the alarm that more must be done to prepare future teachers, especially those sent to failing urban school systems such as those in Philadelphia and Camden.
NEWS
August 26, 2009 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
Hundreds of new teachers who are taking on the challenge of instructing Philadelphia's students this year were asked a pointed question at the opening of the orientation yesterday. "What kind of teacher will you be?" asked Elois Brooks, a consultant for the district's Empowerment Schools. She posed that question to about 800 teachers who gathered at Edison High School, 151 Luzerne St., at the start of the two-day program for new teachers. Among them was actor Tony Danza, who will start teaching at Northeast High School next month for a reality-TV show tentatively airing next spring on the cable channel A&E. Brooks spoke on behalf of Superintendent Arlene Ackerman, who was absent because her father, the Rev. Bennie Randle, 85, died Sunday in St. Louis.
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