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NEWS
June 25, 1992 | By Eileen Kenna, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Crystal Kuykendall, born on a kitchen table in a housing project on the West Side of Chicago, daughter of a teenage mother and a father with a seventh-grade education, became a teacher. Crystal Kuykendall, widowed with two small daughters after her husband was shot to death while jogging, earned a doctorate and became a lawyer, an author and executive director of the National Alliance of Black School Educators. She accomplished all that, and more, she said, because a handful of people, most of them teachers, believed in her along the way. At a conference on wellness as Ursinus College in Collegeville last week, Kuykendall spoke to a packed auditorium of 200 people, most of them teachers, about children who happen to be black and poor, children of every color who happen to be different.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Interboro School District teachers and school board members have reached a tenative contract agreement and expect to hold ratification votes next week. But at three other area school districts - William Penn, Penn Delco and Southeast Delco - negotiations continue as the scheduled opening day of schools draws closer. The threat of a strike and the long-term damage it can cause was on the minds of Interboro school board members as they negotiated with the teachers. "The Garnet Valley strike loomed over our decision process," said John Costello, Interboro school board president.
NEWS
May 10, 2002
AFTER MAKING a deal to protect its own contract under Act 46, the law that allowed the state takeover of Philadelphia public schools, the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers was rather quiet for months. They held a few demonstrations outside the media eye, but the attitude then was "wait and see. " This week, though, the city's teachers' union found its voice - and was it loud. And while it's fair to wonder where they've been until now, the questions the teachers are screaming need to be asked: Just what is a "reconstituted" school - as 19 of the 75 schools slated for "reform" will be?
NEWS
November 20, 2009
STOP, STOP, stop! Enough already with the continuous declarations that children will only achieve if their educator and they share the same ethnicity. That theory holds about as much water as school segregation - and we all know how well that worked out. While I'm merely just an average cracker in the box, I have taught mainly Latino and African-American students, many of whom have been tremendously successful in school. As a matter of fact, the average student whom I've taught has scored either advanced or proficient in mathematics on the PSSAs.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Those perfect spring Fridays - cerulean skies, temperatures in the 70s - are exactly the kind of days that Dan Nerelli has come to dread. That's because Nerelli, assistant superintendent for personnel in the Upper Darby School District, knows he'll be scrambling to put substitutes in dozens of teacher-less classrooms. The Delaware County district's ability to cover faculty absences has plunged from 95 percent just a few years ago to roughly 60 percent. Philadelphia-area school administrators such as Nerelli now struggle to find ways to cope with a shortage of substitutes unlike anything they have ever faced.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | By Christopher Mumma, Special to The Inquirer
Twenty-six teachers and nine school board members in National Park are at an impasse after the board rejected a state-mediated tentative contract agreement between the parties last month. The teachers have been working without a contract since last July, and they have been negotiating for a new contract since December 1990. On Nov. 26, the teachers and the board reached a tentative agreement; and on Dec. 10, the negotiating members agreed to recommend ratification to their respective constituencies.
NEWS
June 10, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Phyllis Della Vecchia stood in front of a room full of teachers and did the unthinkable. The Camden County College president sized up the educators and challenged them to stop listening to jargon and start talking about how to teach their students better. "It has to happen that teachers talk to teachers," she said. "Communication can't just be a buzzword. " Fifty or so men and women from 16 school districts had gathered at the college to help begin the Camden County Academy of Teaching and Learning, and they sat straighter in their seats, nodding as Della Vecchia spoke.
NEWS
June 12, 2009
Superintendent Arlene Ackerman is attacking teachers again. She claims that teachers, despite being represented by an overall union contract, have to sign individual contracts even though they haven't done so in about a quarter of a century. If you want to see what she had sent to the teachers, go to philly.com and search for "school district 'contract' mailed to teachers. " You can then decide what her real intentions are. Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
September 16, 2008
IWOULD like to congratulate the teachers and students in Conwell Middle School and George Washington Carver High School for Engineering & Science, which was one of 320 schools nationwide to be awarded the prestigious No Child Left Behind-Blue Ribbon award. However, I would also like to respond to the student from George Washington Carver High School for Engineering & Science who stated (in a different article) that the teachers in his school did not meet the needs of their students.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bucks County Court Judge Ward F. Clark yesterday ordered striking Morrisville teachers to end their nine-week-old walkout and return to work today. Lynette Reichard, a spokeswoman for the 97-member Morrisville Education Association, said teachers - who defied an earlier order by Clark - would comply with yesterday's injunction. Students are scheduled to return to school tomorrow, Superintendent C. Van Cain said. The injunction leaves only one area school district still on strike - Garnet Valley, Delaware County, where 110 teachers walked off the job Oct. 3. Before yesterday's hearing, Clark admitted he had made an error in issuing the injunction last week without holding a hearing first.
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NEWS
September 17, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie on Thursday asked the New Jersey Supreme Court to reopen the landmark case that for decades has been the basis for the state's school-funding system, seeking the right to break union agreements that he contends are harming students in poor districts. The governor, who has been pushing to redistribute school aid from urban to suburban districts, is arguing that the current funding system - grounded in the court's Abbott v. Burke rulings - hasn't sufficiently improved poorer school districts.
FOOD
September 16, 2016 | By Beth D'Addono, For The Inquirer
When he was a student at Harriton High School in Lower Merion, Alon Shaya chopped a lot of onions. That's because Shaya - now a superstar chef whose New Orleans spot was just named best new restaurant in the country - was a troublemaker as a kid. And every time he got thrown out of class, he'd ask to be sent to Donna Barnett's home-economics class. Barnett, a spitfire of a woman who just retired after 25 years at Harriton, saw something in the troubled teen. When he was at his worst, Shaya would face a mountain of onions.
NEWS
September 12, 2016 | By Mark Pesto, JOHNSTOWN TRIBUNE-DEMOCRAT
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - Robert Fidler, a 17-year-old senior at Shanksville-Stonycreek High School, doesn't remember the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. But he knows exactly what his grandfather was doing when United Flight 93 flew over his Indian Lake home before crashing down in a nearby field. "He was in his living room, with my grandmother, eating breakfast, and he heard the impact of the plane," Fidler said. "About a second later - there were a bunch of trees over his house - all the acorns hit his roof.
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Teachers at the Pennsylvania Virtual Charter School in King of Prussia have unionized. After a long wait that included a controversial decision by the National Labor Relations Board, ballots showed that teachers at the school voted, 57-15, in favor of being represented by the PA Virtual Education Association, an affiliate of the Pennsylvania State Education Association. Teachers voted in 2015, but the ballots were immediately impounded when the school challenged the NLRB's jurisdiction.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, STAFF WRITER
Dena Bassett-Scott stepped over a discarded hypodermic needle and glanced at a pit bull barking urgently against a chain-link fence inches away. "I'm thinking of our younger students - they're walking all this way, and they're seeing all this, and they're scared," said the math teacher at Edison High. On Wednesday, 1,200 pupils are scheduled to report to Edison for the first day of school. On Tuesday, more than 100 staffers walked the North Philadelphia streets that most of their students will travel to get to class.
NEWS
September 6, 2016
ISSUE | PHILA. SCHOOLS Ease teachers' stress I have no doubt that "trauma" and "toxic stress" have a significant impact on students ("Curtailing K suspensions a good first step," Aug. 26), but when will we recognize the stress and pressure that employees are experiencing in the School District of Philadelphia? Daily exposure to violence, pressure, misdirected anger, being understaffed - all while working to support students with significant needs - can be draining and overwhelming.
NEWS
September 2, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
LORRAINE SMITH BASS, 99, a teacher, artist, pianist, and community activist in LaMott, Cheltenham Township, died Wednesday, Aug. 24, at a retirement home in Montgomery County, her family said. Mrs. Bass was born on July 26, 1917, in Wayne, the first of two children of Joel C. Smith and Beulah Mosley Smith. She was predeceased by her brother, Joel C. Smith Jr. Mrs. Bass graduated second in her high school class at age 16, said son Aaron Jr. She went on to Cheyney University, where she graduated first in her class, he said.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School Reform Commission's nearly two-year battle to cancel the city teachers' union contract and impose new work rules to save money was soundly defeated again Monday. The state Supreme Court upheld a lower court decision last January that blocked the five-member commission from forcing terms on the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. Union leaders called the ruling a rebuke of a power grab, and a spokesman for the commission and Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said no further legal action would be taken.
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