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NEWS
June 25, 1992 | By Eileen Kenna, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Crystal Kuykendall, born on a kitchen table in a housing project on the West Side of Chicago, daughter of a teenage mother and a father with a seventh-grade education, became a teacher. Crystal Kuykendall, widowed with two small daughters after her husband was shot to death while jogging, earned a doctorate and became a lawyer, an author and executive director of the National Alliance of Black School Educators. She accomplished all that, and more, she said, because a handful of people, most of them teachers, believed in her along the way. At a conference on wellness as Ursinus College in Collegeville last week, Kuykendall spoke to a packed auditorium of 200 people, most of them teachers, about children who happen to be black and poor, children of every color who happen to be different.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Interboro School District teachers and school board members have reached a tenative contract agreement and expect to hold ratification votes next week. But at three other area school districts - William Penn, Penn Delco and Southeast Delco - negotiations continue as the scheduled opening day of schools draws closer. The threat of a strike and the long-term damage it can cause was on the minds of Interboro school board members as they negotiated with the teachers. "The Garnet Valley strike loomed over our decision process," said John Costello, Interboro school board president.
NEWS
May 10, 2002
AFTER MAKING a deal to protect its own contract under Act 46, the law that allowed the state takeover of Philadelphia public schools, the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers was rather quiet for months. They held a few demonstrations outside the media eye, but the attitude then was "wait and see. " This week, though, the city's teachers' union found its voice - and was it loud. And while it's fair to wonder where they've been until now, the questions the teachers are screaming need to be asked: Just what is a "reconstituted" school - as 19 of the 75 schools slated for "reform" will be?
NEWS
November 20, 2009
STOP, STOP, stop! Enough already with the continuous declarations that children will only achieve if their educator and they share the same ethnicity. That theory holds about as much water as school segregation - and we all know how well that worked out. While I'm merely just an average cracker in the box, I have taught mainly Latino and African-American students, many of whom have been tremendously successful in school. As a matter of fact, the average student whom I've taught has scored either advanced or proficient in mathematics on the PSSAs.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITER
Teachers at Agora Cyber Charter School - the second largest cyber in the state - have voted overwhelmingly to become unionized, a new local affiliate of the Pennsylvania State Education Association announced late Tuesday afternoon. The National Labor Relations Board in Philadelphia, which tallied the mail ballots, said that teachers at the cyber based in King of Prussia had voted 312-46 in favor of being represented by the Agora Cyber Education Association. Union organizers said that the vote came after a 10-month campaign that focused on changes to working conditions without notice and lack of teacher involvement in decisions about curriculum, classroom objectives or learning conditions for students.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | By Christopher Mumma, Special to The Inquirer
Twenty-six teachers and nine school board members in National Park are at an impasse after the board rejected a state-mediated tentative contract agreement between the parties last month. The teachers have been working without a contract since last July, and they have been negotiating for a new contract since December 1990. On Nov. 26, the teachers and the board reached a tentative agreement; and on Dec. 10, the negotiating members agreed to recommend ratification to their respective constituencies.
NEWS
June 10, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Phyllis Della Vecchia stood in front of a room full of teachers and did the unthinkable. The Camden County College president sized up the educators and challenged them to stop listening to jargon and start talking about how to teach their students better. "It has to happen that teachers talk to teachers," she said. "Communication can't just be a buzzword. " Fifty or so men and women from 16 school districts had gathered at the college to help begin the Camden County Academy of Teaching and Learning, and they sat straighter in their seats, nodding as Della Vecchia spoke.
NEWS
June 12, 2009
Superintendent Arlene Ackerman is attacking teachers again. She claims that teachers, despite being represented by an overall union contract, have to sign individual contracts even though they haven't done so in about a quarter of a century. If you want to see what she had sent to the teachers, go to philly.com and search for "school district 'contract' mailed to teachers. " You can then decide what her real intentions are. Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
September 16, 2008
IWOULD like to congratulate the teachers and students in Conwell Middle School and George Washington Carver High School for Engineering & Science, which was one of 320 schools nationwide to be awarded the prestigious No Child Left Behind-Blue Ribbon award. However, I would also like to respond to the student from George Washington Carver High School for Engineering & Science who stated (in a different article) that the teachers in his school did not meet the needs of their students.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bucks County Court Judge Ward F. Clark yesterday ordered striking Morrisville teachers to end their nine-week-old walkout and return to work today. Lynette Reichard, a spokeswoman for the 97-member Morrisville Education Association, said teachers - who defied an earlier order by Clark - would comply with yesterday's injunction. Students are scheduled to return to school tomorrow, Superintendent C. Van Cain said. The injunction leaves only one area school district still on strike - Garnet Valley, Delaware County, where 110 teachers walked off the job Oct. 3. Before yesterday's hearing, Clark admitted he had made an error in issuing the injunction last week without holding a hearing first.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School Reform Commission's nearly two-year battle to cancel the city teachers' union contract and impose new work rules to save money was soundly defeated again Monday. The state Supreme Court upheld a lower court decision last January that blocked the five-member commission from forcing terms on the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. Union leaders called the ruling a rebuke of a power grab, and a spokesman for the commission and Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said no further legal action would be taken.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: My daughter suffers from general anxiety and just finished middle school. To thank her teachers for helping her through her moments of panic, I made each of them a nice zippered tote bag and loaded it with supplies and a small gift card. It took a lot of work on my part, which I thoroughly enjoyed, and also cost a lot for the materials. I am feeling disappointed that none of the teachers, seven of them, has acknowledged the gift. I didn't deliver them personally but am confident they did receive them.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Audrey R. Davis Crocker, 93, of West Philadelphia, a former seamstress, food worker, and teacher's aide in the Philadelphia School District, died Monday, Aug. 1, of an intestinal ailment at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. Born in Rincon, Ga., to Joseph and Lucille Giles, she moved to Philadelphia as an infant with her family. She was educated in the Philadelphia public schools. She became a Christian at age 8. She joined Second Mt. Zion Baptist Church and stayed faithful to the church over the years.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
New Jersey Senate President Stephen Sweeney on Wednesday accused the state's largest teacher union and the state Fraternal Order of Police of attempted bribery, saying each threatened to withhold campaign contributions if the Senate did not vote on a proposed pension-funding bill. Sweeney (D., Gloucester) spoke at a news conference in Trenton and then released letters he sent to U.S. Attorney Paul Fishman and newly appointed state Attorney General Christopher Porrino that ask for a criminal probe into the New Jersey Education Association's actions.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Arnetha N. Williams, 91, of Philadelphia, a longtime educator in the city's public schools and a dedicated church member, died Friday, July 22, at home of complications from an earlier stroke. Born to Luther and Lula Bates-Williams, Ms. Williams received religious training at a very early age. She was 8 when her mother died. She turned for solace to Miller Memorial Baptist Church in North Philadelphia, where she participated in Sunday school and the Baptist Young People's Union. Later, she joined the church choir, raised money for scholarships, planned the women's group lunches, and researched and wrote the church's history.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A Montgomery County middle-school teacher was charged Tuesday with sexually assaulting two teenage girls, authorities said Wednesday. Jason Gattuso, 39, of East Fairwood Drive in Chalfont, Bucks County, was a social studies teacher at Springfield Township Middle School, the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office said. Gattuso was interviewed Monday and admitted to having sex with the girls, who were 14 and 15 years old, according to the criminal complaint filed by Springfield and Whitemarsh police.
NEWS
July 27, 2016
Thomas Sutherland, 85, a teacher who was held captive in Lebanon for more than six years, died Friday in Fort Collins, Colo., according to Colorado State University. Mr. Sutherland was released in 1991 and returned home to become professor emeritus at the university. He was one of a number of Americans in Lebanon - including Associated Press bureau chief Terry Anderson - who were kidnapped by terrorist groups in the 1980s. He was dean of the Faculty of Agriculture and Food Science at American University in Beirut when he was taken hostage by Islamic terrorists in 1985.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
About three weeks ago, William H. Anton Sr. dropped off his wife, Mary, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and watched her approach an entrance. After he had parked his car, he returned to find her in the lobby. But before going to her appointment, their son Joseph said, she asked her husband to get her a pretzel and a Mountain Dew. Why that brand of soda, which she didn't drink? "It was for somebody outside," her son said, "who was homeless and asked her. " "This," he said, "was a shining example of how she lived her life.
NEWS
July 15, 2016
LOS ANGELES - The mills of justice grind slowly, but life plunges on, leaving lives blighted when justice, by being delayed, is irremediably denied. Fortunately, California's Supreme Court might soon decide to hear - four years after litigation began - the 21st century's most portentous civil rights case, which concerns an ongoing denial of equal protection of the law. Every year, measurable injuries are inflicted on tens of thousands of already at-risk children by this state's teacher tenure system, which is so politically entrenched that only the courts can protect the discrete and insular minority it victimizes.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITER martha.woodall@ phillynews.com 215-854-2789 @marwooda
A teacher at beleaguered Delaware Valley Charter High School has asked the Philadelphia School District's top financial official to reconsider withholding $820,000 in payments to the school this summer. The district said the charter school in Logan owes the money for overbilling for students in past years and failing to make required pension payments for teachers. But Matthew Black, 27, who has taught math at the school for two years, said it's the teachers and other staffers who were hurt when the charter could not make payroll last week.
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