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Teaching Hospitals

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NEWS
December 21, 1989 | By Daniel Q. Haney, Associated Press Inquirer staff writer Donald C. Drake contributed to this article
People are more likely to die from their illnesses when admitted to osteopathic, public or for-profit hospitals, but private hospitals affiliated with medical schools offer the best chance of getting well, a study concludes. The research, based on federal statistics, also concludes that hospitals are most likely to save patients' lives when they have the best-trained doctors and nurses, a lot of sophisticated equipment, large payrolls and high occupancy rates. "All of our findings have the same possible explanation: They reflect differences in quality," said Dr. Arthur J. Hartz, principal author of the research at the Medical College of Wisconsin.
NEWS
April 22, 1999 | by Morton Kondracke
Bleeding financially, the nation's teaching hospitals fear they are about to be slashed further by, of all people, a heart surgeon - Sen. Bill Frist, R-Tenn. Frist says, and credibly, that it isn't so and that he actually means to save the hospitals from the perils of modern medical economics. Congress needs to secure U.S. graduate medical education. But aid to the hospitals is a sideshow in Congress' epic Medicare political wars, so chances are nothing will happen this year and the bleeding will go on. Many of the nation's 1,250 academic medical centers - which train the nation's future doctors, conduct research and take care of some of the poorest and sickest people in America - are already in deep trouble.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
The 17 teaching hospitals in the Philadelphia area have become a powerful economic contributor to the region's health, and a strong generator of jobs, many of which go to minority applicants, according to a new report on the economic impact of health care on several metropolitan areas. Philadelphia hospitals contributed more than $1.4 billion to the economy of the eight-county metropolitan area and attracted another $299 million in research grants, said the report, released last week by the Commonwealth Fund's Task Force on Academic Health Centers.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1998 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Woodrow A. Myers Jr., who oversees health care for all Ford Motor Co. employees, ventured into the heart of a prominent Philadelphia teaching hospital yesterday and issued this challenge to academic medicine: Prove that you're as good as you think you are. It isn't enough that teaching hospitals say research sets them apart and justifies their high-cost medical care, Myers said. "We want very much to believe you," he told more than 100 people at the seventh annual Raymond C. Grandon lecture at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1988 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hit hard by federal cutbacks, increased competition and shifts in the way medical care is provided, Philadelphia's six university hospitals are being forced to re-examine their traditional roles as educators and health-care providers. After years of strong growth and healthy profits, three of the six academic medical centers here reported operating losses last year. One broke even. And the profit margins of the two centers that did make money dropped sharply. The downturn in business, which many predict will accelerate as federal officials seek additional cutbacks in health-care funding, is prompting administrators to make unprecedented changes in the way they do business and to search for new ways to generate revenues.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
The 17 teaching hospitals in the Philadelphia area have become a powerful economic contributor to the region's health, and a strong generator of jobs, many of which go to minority applicants, according to a new report on the economic impact of health care on several metropolitan areas. Philadelphia hospitals contributed more than $1.4 billion to the economy of the eight-county metropolitan area and attracted another $299 million in research grants, said the report, released last week by the Commonwealth Fund's Task Force on Academic Health Centers.
NEWS
August 25, 1989
Abortion opponents in Pennsylvania are not content with having fostered laws that are discriminatory in the way they limit poor women's right to a legal abortion. They now seem intent on even more intrusive and objectionable ways of infringing on rights that the U.S. Supreme Court says still belong to all women. So it's good to see that abortion-rights activists, after a decade of only practicing damage control, are planning to confront the battle head- on. In their counter-attack, the abortion-rights forces are talking about stripping away legal provisions that eliminated most Medicaid-funded abortions, one of the most egregious and unfair restrictions.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1991 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doctors who practice at university teaching hospitals in big cities can expect to see sharp declines in their incomes when Medicare begins phasing in a new fee schedule in January, a study by University of Pennsylvania doctors predicts. And because academic medical centers depend on physician income to help pay for the training of new doctors, they will face increased pressure to find new sources of income, according to a report appearing in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)
BUSINESS
September 26, 1995 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leaders of Pennsylvania's academic medical centers - places that train doctors, take care of patients, and do research - have been touring the state, and Washington, for weeks now, trying to head off deep cuts in their special Medicare funding. Last week, they found out who was listening. House Republicans released a proposal that outlined much less painful cuts in funding than lawmakers were suggesting earlier this year. In fact, if a new trust fund for medical education survives the debate and if it has as much money in it as its sponsors say - two very big ifs - teaching hospitals could come out about even.
LIVING
June 13, 1995 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officially, Maria Isabel Limardo of Venezuela is studying the genetics of skin disease at Thomas Jefferson University. But the South American is also getting a lesson in world culture in the dermatology laboratory at Jefferson Medical College, where she shares workspace, scientific equipment and recipes with researchers from nearly a dozen countries. Take, for instance, her Finnish partners on a research project of an inherited skin disease that causes blisters, called bullous permphigoid.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 5, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
High-quality stroke care was supposed to put the Capital Health System Inc. on the map when it went deeply into debt to open a $530 million hospital along I-95 in Hopewell Township in 2011. To make it happen, Capital recruited highly regarded neurosurgeon Erol Veznedaroglu from Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, betting that Capital could attract patients who historically went to teaching hospitals in New York and Philadelphia. It didn't work out. Facing an exodus of physicians and other professionals from its neurosciences program, Capital last week sued Veznedaroglu and his new employer, Drexel University, in federal court in New Jersey for $80 million in damages.
NEWS
May 5, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fred Henson was waiting to be discharged after gallbladder surgery when yet another hospital staffer came to his room bearing pills. The visitor, a pharmacist at Einstein Medical Center, discussed in detail the contents of each of the four vials. She gave him a compartmentalized pillbox and a matching sheet of paper with photos of each pill accompanied by descriptions of what it does and when and how to take it. And then she sent him home with well over 100 pills - a month's supply - so there'd be no need to take new scripts to a pharmacy and deal with insurance hassles.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN INEZ COOPER was a teaching assistant at the John Wanamaker Middle School, she didn't confine her work with the students to the school building.   She would take them to church and to Vacation Bible School. She would also visit their homes and invite their parents to church. Always concerned about her charges' spiritual health, she would also add their names to the prayer lists in her church and urge others to pray for them. With all that attention, many of her students went on to successful careers and lives, owing much of their progress to the mentoring of the concerned and loving woman who cared for them.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Jordan Rau, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
Medicare's first public effort to pinpoint hospitals with high complication rates has identified many prestigious teaching hospitals in Pennsylvania and around the nation, raising concerns at these places but also bolstering objections that the government's measures are skewed. Temple University Hospital, Hahnemann University Hospital, Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania were among those places having far more serious complications than the average hospital, according to the Medicare program.
NEWS
July 27, 2011 | BY KEN BRAITHWAITE
THE MIRROR image of "Build it and they will come" ( "Eliminate It and We Won't Need It" ) seems to be the idea behind many health-care proposals suggested as part of D.C. deficit-reduction negotiations. Proposed Medicare cuts will hurt patients, doctors, and hospitals in the region and the state especially hard. Pennsylvania is one of the oldest states in the union, and we have the third-highest percentage of residents who are covered by Medicare. The needs of older adults, who typically require about double the health-care services used by younger people, won't go away just because Medicare funding has been slashed.
NEWS
July 1, 2011 | By Gregory Thomas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Young doctors are about to be prescribed more sleep. Beginning Friday, new rules will reduce the number of consecutive hours that first-year resident physicians can work - from 30 to 16. The mandate is billed as a means of enhancing patient safety and residents' quality of life by reducing physician fatigue and errors. But it will also boost hospital costs and further reduce the long hours that some doctors believe are critical to learning. Doctors in Philadelphia, an epicenter of teaching hospitals and medical schools, helped usher in this sea change.
NEWS
July 23, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON - Rutgers University will not be getting into the marijuana growing business. New Jersey's largest university has declined a request from Gov. Chris Christie to become the lone grower of the state's medical marijuana crop. The school's dean of environmental and biological sciences department tells The Star-Ledger of Newark that marijuana's status as an illegal drug would jeopardize federal funding to the school. The Legislature approved a plan allowing patients with certain chronic illnesses to access marijuana.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey's hospitals barely broke even last year, according to the New Jersey Hospital Association. In its annual report on its members' finances, the association said the average operating margin - the equivalent of profits on operations - was only 0.2 percent. Total margin, which includes return on investments, was even worse: minus 14.1 percent. The report was based on audited financial statements from 48 acute-care hospitals and systems - 95 percent of the total - and six rehabilitation hospitals.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Metro Philadelphia's mix of corporate employers makes for a mellow regional economy, slow-growing but also recession-resistant. An Inquirer survey of more than 200 major employers shows the region's biggest job engines are the hospital system affiliated with Thomas Jefferson University, and the combination of the University of Pennsylvania and its hospital network. Other big employers include drugmakers and medical-device manufacturers such as Merck & Co. Inc., GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Metro Philadelphia's mix of corporate employers makes for a mellow regional economy, slow-growing but also recession-resistant. An Inquirer survey of more than 200 major employers shows the region's biggest job engines are the hospital system affiliated with Thomas Jefferson University, and the combination of the University of Pennsylvania and its hospital network. Other big employers include drugmakers and medical-device manufacturers such as Merck & Co. Inc. , GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
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