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NEWS
March 25, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Lower Moreland officials have reached contract agreements with public works, clerical and non-uniformed police employees in the the township. The agreements were reached last week between the 18 employees, who are all members of Teamsters Union 107, according to a union spokeswoman. The union represents nine public works employees and nine clerical and non- uniformed police employees whose jobs range from receptionist to dispatcher. The agreement offers public works employees a 5 percent increase for each year of the two-year pact, and it gives clerical and non-uniformed employees an average annual pay increase of 5 percent over the two years, according to township manager Alison D. Winter.
NEWS
November 4, 1998 | By Linda Loyd and Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The District Attorney's Office has approved arrest warrants for two suspects in the fight outside City Hall last month between anti-Clinton demonstrators and pro-Clinton pickets, authorities said yesterday. Officials identified them as Kevin McNulty, 21, and Marc Nardone, 20, both of Northeast Philadelphia, both members of the Teamsters union. They were expected to surrender today and will be charged with aggravated and simple assault, recklessly endangering other persons and conspiracy in the Oct. 2 incident, police said.
NEWS
April 22, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With his organization under fire from the Teamsters' international governing board, the president of Local 676 announced his retirement to a gathering of union members yesterday. A letter posted on the door of Local 676 headquarters in Collingswood and dated last Monday - the day longtime local president John Jackson's retirement took effect - alleges improper conduct by the local's leadership. Signed by James P. Hoffa, president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, it calls for a trusteeship to be set up for the local and announces a hearing on that recommendation at 9:30 a.m. May 16. The letter alleges the leadership has not run the local in accordance with membership rules.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Employees of the Toys 'R Us Store at the Cedarbrook Mall in Cheltenham Township, grumbling that "the only time we get a raise is when Congress passes an increase in the minimum wage," have voted to join the Teamsters Union. If the vote is certified by the National Labor Relations Board, the store will become the only one among 650 Toys 'R Us outlets (including Kids 'R Us stores) to be organized. The store employees voted 26-11 to join Teamsters Local 830. Local president John Muller said the employees had initiated the organization effort and only two or three failed to vote.
NEWS
June 12, 1989 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
About 700 union workers at three General Electric Corp. plants in South Jersey stand poised to strike later this week after they voted overwhelmingly yesterday to reject management's salary offer, officials said. At a meeting in Collingswood, more than 500 members of the International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers, Local 241, rejected the offer of salary increases totaling 2 percent over the next three years and cash bonuses totaling $1,200 spread out over three years.
SPORTS
March 10, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Emma Igelstrom, the short-course 50-meter breaststroke world recordholder, will take time off from swimming to deal with an eating disorder. In a letter to the Swedish news agency TT, Igelstrom, 24, said she is fighting bulimia for the second time in her career. "This time, I don't have the energy and stamina to fight [the illness] alone, and I have hence decided to, supported by treatment and those close to me, win once and for all," Igelstrom wrote. Igelstrom did not say how long she expected to be away from competitive swimming.
NEWS
October 3, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The E.W. Scripps Co. announced plans yesterday to sell The Pittsburgh Press, citing mounting losses from a 4 1/2-month-old strike by delivery drivers. "There comes a point where you can give no more," said Jimmy Manis, general manager of The Pittsburgh Press Co. "Their latest offer doesn't allow us to get back into business. " The announcement came a day after talks between the company and the Teamsters union collapsed. Manis said he hoped negotiations would continue. He said he could not say whether the sale would be called off if an agreement were reached.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2006 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Negotiators for The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News and their largest labor union initialed a tentative labor agreement late last night, capping months of often acrimonious contract talks. "It's a very difficult agreement" that will force the union to make tough choices about the future extent of medical coverage for advertising, news, circulation and finance workers and retirees at the papers, union president Henry J. Holcomb warned. The proposal will be presented to members at a previously scheduled informational meeting today but won't face a member vote until at least this weekend because union rules require several days' advance notice, he said.
NEWS
October 5, 1998 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Teamsters' Union boss Johnny Morris clapped his hat onto the head of an anti-Clinton demonstrator. Then all hell broke loose. The demonstrator, Donald Adams, maintained that Morris' hat trick was a signal for other Teamsters to beat him to the ground as he picketed Friday outside City Hall, where President Clinton was visiting. Adams, 38, of Cheltenham, filed a private criminal complaint against Morris on Saturday. Police said they would watch TV videotape of the melee to see if charges are warranted.
NEWS
July 28, 1986
Apparently even the law is no obstacle when the Reagan administration wants to help the Teamsters Union - the only major labor union to support Ronald Reagan's candidacy in 1980 and again in 1984. Federal law requires the government to remain neutral in contests between unions for the right to represent workers. That, however, didn't stop the White House last fall from helping the Teamsters win a close election to represent civilian employees at Fort Sill, Okla. Mitchell Daniels, political director for the White House, personally arranged for the Army to help the Teamsters.
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NEWS
January 27, 2016
John Jay Hooker Jr., 85, a Nashville political figure who spent his last days fighting to make physician-assisted suicide legal in Tennessee, died Sunday, a family friend said. Political strategist Tom Ingram said he received a message from one of Mr. Hooker's daughters that he had died in hospice. He had been suffering from metastatic melanoma. Mr. Hooker had brilliant successes early in life as a lawyer. Tapped in 1958 to prosecute the impeachment of a Chattanooga judge accused of accepting bribes from racketeers, he fell into the orbit of Robert Kennedy, who was investigating the Teamsters union.
NEWS
February 12, 2015
ABOUT 200 members of the carpenters union converged on the Philadelphia Auto show at the Pennsylvania Convention Center on Saturday to protest their lack of a contract with the center's management. Converged is probably too nice a word. Invaded is more like it. The union says it was just exercising its right to free speech, handing out fliers to people attending the big show, which drew 60,000 people on Saturday. The center's management - citing eyewitness reports and surveillance videos - said that the carpenters came in waves, beginning about 12:30 p.m., and engaged in repeated acts of harassment and vandalism: stuffing auto interiors with leaflets, stealing fuses and knobs on dashboards, removing oil caps and ripping out wiring.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU LISTEN carefully, you can still hear Joe Montgomery singing "Danny Boy. " It's been some years since Joe graced the choir loft of Transfiguration Church in West Philadelphia with his distinctive Irish tenor. But there are those who swear they can still hear his voice raised in those songs that never fail to stir the heart or bring a tear to the eye of a true Irish patriot. Joe Montgomery is gone, but the work he did for the Irish community in Philadelphia and the people he inspired with his devotion to the rites and traditions of those places live on wherever green is worn.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JACK McBRIDE'S DOOR was always open. Friends, friends of friends, his sons' friends - all were welcome to drop in anytime, check out the refrigerator, have a meal, sleep over if they wanted to. A happy, congenial Irishman, Jack was the kind of guy who always gave of himself, whether it was to his five sons, his cherished grandkids or his many friends. Jack was there with an open door and an open heart. And his grandkids could wrap him around their fingers. They were spoiled rotten by Grandad.
NEWS
March 15, 2010 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a chance to rub elbows with Hollywood stars. And make good money while doing it. For years, a select group of Teamsters Local 107 members have apparently been on a short list for high-paying jobs on movie shoots in the Philadelphia area. That may change. In response to an investigation alleging favoritism and nepotism in the local's hiring process, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters has appointed an outside trustee to oversee job assignments within the movie and trade-show industries.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph Brock grew up in a union household, eating hot dogs on the picket line and tagging behind his father, a top Pennsylvania Teamster official who now is retired. Brock, a mechanic by trade, eventually became president of Local 830, the largest Teamster local in Philadelphia. Local 830 represents 4,000 drivers and warehouse workers in soda- and beer-bottling and distribution. In 2006, he challenged longtime incumbent Daniel Grace for Local 830?s top job, secretary-treasurer.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2006 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Negotiators for The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News and their largest labor union initialed a tentative labor agreement late last night, capping months of often acrimonious contract talks. "It's a very difficult agreement" that will force the union to make tough choices about the future extent of medical coverage for advertising, news, circulation and finance workers and retirees at the papers, union president Henry J. Holcomb warned. The proposal will be presented to members at a previously scheduled informational meeting today but won't face a member vote until at least this weekend because union rules require several days' advance notice, he said.
NEWS
October 19, 2006 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Rendell has not been Mayor Rendell since 1999, and legendary Teamsters boss John "Johnny" Morris has been dead four years. But yesterday the content of two conversations between the men eight years ago continued to fuel a civil-rights lawsuit filed by Cheltenham siblings who contend that their free-speech rights were violated when they were beaten by Teamsters for heckling President Bill Clinton at an Oct. 2, 1998, appearance in Center City....
NEWS
December 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Salvadore J. Strigari, 81, of West Mount Airy, a retired teacher and credit union treasurer, died of heart failure Dec. 20 after dropping off a holiday donation at a homeless shelter in Center City. Mr. Strigari's daughter Victoria Dawson said her father had driven downtown because he wanted to hand-deliver a check to Women of Hope, a shelter for women with chronic mental illness. He was about to return home when he was stricken. For 35 years, Mr. Strigari taught English and mathematics at Penn Treaty Junior High School in Port Richmond.
SPORTS
March 10, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Emma Igelstrom, the short-course 50-meter breaststroke world recordholder, will take time off from swimming to deal with an eating disorder. In a letter to the Swedish news agency TT, Igelstrom, 24, said she is fighting bulimia for the second time in her career. "This time, I don't have the energy and stamina to fight [the illness] alone, and I have hence decided to, supported by treatment and those close to me, win once and for all," Igelstrom wrote. Igelstrom did not say how long she expected to be away from competitive swimming.
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