CollectionsTechno Music
IN THE NEWS

Techno Music

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | By Dennis Romero, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When you're raving, the last thing you want to see is the cops. But there they are, cruising along North Fifth just after midnight, staring up at the shadowy second-floor windows that radiate relentless bass. Down below, one of the party's young hosts greets them: Yes, everything's going fine, officers - it's just a little get-together at my loft. They drive away into a misty night, indifferent or oblivious to the 350 teenagers and twentysomethings pumping adrenaline in a tribal stomp inside this long-ago factory in a down-at-the-heels neighborhood.
NEWS
May 30, 2000 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
A dance-through-the-night "rave" party in Pennsauken was nothing to rave about for 22 people who were hospitalized, apparently after taking an elixir of illegal drugs, authorities said. Police suspect that many of the party-goers suffered the effects of ecstasy, a drug that may have been used at the "Whistle 3" rave at the South Jersey Expo Center. The all-night party drew an estimated 11,000 to the massive convention hall. Besides the Expo Center, the rave featured a "pre-festival" and "post-festival" at two Center City nightclubs, Club Space and Shampoo.
NEWS
June 9, 2000 | by Nolan Reese, Daily News Staff Writer
"Better Living Through Circuitry" is the second in an unofficial trilogy of rave films being released this summer. The first, "Human Traffic," breezed through Philly last month, and the third, "Groove," will be released June 30. "Better Living," unlike the other two films, is a documentary that sets itself up as an expose on rave culture but quickly shifts gears to become a concert film for the bands that use raves as venues. The rave scene has been well explored, particularly on prime-time news magazine shows, so the last thing anyone needs is another documentary proclaiming that the rave culture and the Gen-X kids it attracts are responsible for all of society's ills.
SPORTS
August 21, 2004 | By Ashley McGeachy Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The best guest pass to have during the Olympics is the one that gets you into the Sports Illustrated parties. They are off the charts. Thursday night's was No. 2 of four pricey bashes the magazine will throw for its advertisers and selected guests during the Games. Held at the Akrotiri Lounge in the southern part of Greece, the event began at 9 p.m. and ended at 4 a.m. There was a sushi bar, a lamb station, waiters bearing delicious prosciutto wraps, shot glasses filled with ouzo and berries, and miniature waffle cones topped with raspberry ice cream.
NEWS
December 29, 1995 | By Rick Rothacker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Loud, high-speed, synthesizer-based music permeates everything, thumping out from speakers everywhere. Bright-colored lasers stab through the dark room, spattering crowds of sweating, pulsating dancers. It was the biggest rave ever in the Philadelphia area: Thousands jammed inside a cavernous room, dancing to techno music all night and well past dawn. The cultural wave first hit about eight years ago in grungy cityscapes that offered plenty of vacant warehouses, buildings and underground clubs.
NEWS
November 2, 1999 | by April Adamson, and Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writers
Wearing baggy psychedelic clothes, they party for 12 hours at a time to the beat of ear-splitting techno-music, feasting on potent synthetic drugs. This dance revolution is called a "rave," an all-night party that has become underground entertainment for 20-somethings and teens all over the world. Drawn by the Internet and word-of-mouth, hundreds or thousands of gyrating young people gather in cavernous warehouses, abandoned buildings, even the outdoors. Raves were pioneered in Manchester, England, in the late 1980s.
NEWS
June 7, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
The din in the room climbs to a roar as the speed of the circling, leaping in-line skaters increases. A command to "fall," delivered via public-address system by a young woman in a warm-up suit, results in 25 skaters dropping to their knees. Nearby, a crowd shouts encouragement to a rock-climber who is attempting an ascent with his eyes closed. It's not ESPN2 run amok, but rather a typical physical education class in the Neshaminy School District in Bucks County. The parallel to ESPN2, the cable channel that features "extreme" sports, is not lost on the students, however.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Omen, along with Rosemary's Baby and The Exorcist, is one in the terror trinity that redefined horror films during the era when Nixon and Ford led the free world. As to why the spawn of Satan was so pervasive then, let's just say that sympathy for the devil was not only the name of a Rolling Stones song. At the time, Roger Ebert noted that "what Jesus was to '50s movie epics the devil is to the '70s. " A little late for the millennium, but just in time for 06-06-06 this week, Beelzebub's boy has come back.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1994 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Cool reggae. Blackjack tables where you never lose. Techno music throbbing out of speakers. You're on the riverfront, baby, and it's time to cut loose. Nightspots along the Delaware River are gearing up for another big summer, and their owners are crossing their collective fingers for good weather. You'll find new looks at some existing clubs, and several brand-new spots - including the giant Dave & Buster's, a sort of overgrown Chuck E. Cheese with a liquor license.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
As we near the end of this year's Hawaii-themed Philadelphia International Flower Show, it's time to take stock: Fazed by the maze. Based on random interviews, the completely new layout - intended to keep the event fresh, interest high, and visitors on their toes - is bombing with quite a few longtime show-goers. They can't find their favorite exhibits and don't like change for the sake of change, and they're saying so to volunteers from the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, which sponsors the show.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
As we near the end of this year's Hawaii-themed Philadelphia International Flower Show, it's time to take stock: Fazed by the maze. Based on random interviews, the completely new layout - intended to keep the event fresh, interest high, and visitors on their toes - is bombing with quite a few longtime show-goers. They can't find their favorite exhibits and don't like change for the sake of change, and they're saying so to volunteers from the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, which sponsors the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Omen, along with Rosemary's Baby and The Exorcist, is one in the terror trinity that redefined horror films during the era when Nixon and Ford led the free world. As to why the spawn of Satan was so pervasive then, let's just say that sympathy for the devil was not only the name of a Rolling Stones song. At the time, Roger Ebert noted that "what Jesus was to '50s movie epics the devil is to the '70s. " A little late for the millennium, but just in time for 06-06-06 this week, Beelzebub's boy has come back.
SPORTS
August 21, 2004 | By Ashley McGeachy Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The best guest pass to have during the Olympics is the one that gets you into the Sports Illustrated parties. They are off the charts. Thursday night's was No. 2 of four pricey bashes the magazine will throw for its advertisers and selected guests during the Games. Held at the Akrotiri Lounge in the southern part of Greece, the event began at 9 p.m. and ended at 4 a.m. There was a sushi bar, a lamb station, waiters bearing delicious prosciutto wraps, shot glasses filled with ouzo and berries, and miniature waffle cones topped with raspberry ice cream.
NEWS
June 9, 2000 | by Nolan Reese, Daily News Staff Writer
"Better Living Through Circuitry" is the second in an unofficial trilogy of rave films being released this summer. The first, "Human Traffic," breezed through Philly last month, and the third, "Groove," will be released June 30. "Better Living," unlike the other two films, is a documentary that sets itself up as an expose on rave culture but quickly shifts gears to become a concert film for the bands that use raves as venues. The rave scene has been well explored, particularly on prime-time news magazine shows, so the last thing anyone needs is another documentary proclaiming that the rave culture and the Gen-X kids it attracts are responsible for all of society's ills.
NEWS
May 30, 2000 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
A dance-through-the-night "rave" party in Pennsauken was nothing to rave about for 22 people who were hospitalized, apparently after taking an elixir of illegal drugs, authorities said. Police suspect that many of the party-goers suffered the effects of ecstasy, a drug that may have been used at the "Whistle 3" rave at the South Jersey Expo Center. The all-night party drew an estimated 11,000 to the massive convention hall. Besides the Expo Center, the rave featured a "pre-festival" and "post-festival" at two Center City nightclubs, Club Space and Shampoo.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The music - a mix of house and techno - was so loud the floor shook. The young people had the look down - pacifiers, glow sticks, glittery eye shadow on both sexes. The setting, an old warehouse, was right, too. And if some of the partyers weren't actually zonked out of their minds, they sure were doing a good imitation of it, slumped on the floor, heads lolling, eyes rolled back. So far, the scene had all the classic elements of a rave. Except for one thing - it was at a nightclub.
NEWS
November 2, 1999 | by April Adamson, and Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writers
Wearing baggy psychedelic clothes, they party for 12 hours at a time to the beat of ear-splitting techno-music, feasting on potent synthetic drugs. This dance revolution is called a "rave," an all-night party that has become underground entertainment for 20-somethings and teens all over the world. Drawn by the Internet and word-of-mouth, hundreds or thousands of gyrating young people gather in cavernous warehouses, abandoned buildings, even the outdoors. Raves were pioneered in Manchester, England, in the late 1980s.
NEWS
June 7, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
The din in the room climbs to a roar as the speed of the circling, leaping in-line skaters increases. A command to "fall," delivered via public-address system by a young woman in a warm-up suit, results in 25 skaters dropping to their knees. Nearby, a crowd shouts encouragement to a rock-climber who is attempting an ascent with his eyes closed. It's not ESPN2 run amok, but rather a typical physical education class in the Neshaminy School District in Bucks County. The parallel to ESPN2, the cable channel that features "extreme" sports, is not lost on the students, however.
LIVING
June 22, 1998 | This story contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, People, Variety and the New York Daily News
Bill Cosby, America's media dad, spent a bittersweet Father's Day bracing for the trial of the man accused of killing his son. Opening statements are scheduled today in Santa Monica, Calif., in the trial of Michael Markhasev, 19, charged with fatally shooting Ennis Cosby, 27, as the victim changed a flat tire Jan. 16, 1997, on his Mercedes-Benz. North Philly native Cosby has said he wants dignity and due process in the trial. That may actually happen: Cameras are banned, lawyers aren't talking to the press, and the judge is determined to get a verdict in less than a month.
NEWS
December 29, 1995 | By Rick Rothacker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Loud, high-speed, synthesizer-based music permeates everything, thumping out from speakers everywhere. Bright-colored lasers stab through the dark room, spattering crowds of sweating, pulsating dancers. It was the biggest rave ever in the Philadelphia area: Thousands jammed inside a cavernous room, dancing to techno music all night and well past dawn. The cultural wave first hit about eight years ago in grungy cityscapes that offered plenty of vacant warehouses, buildings and underground clubs.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|