CollectionsTechnology
IN THE NEWS

Technology

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. William H. Gray 3d sat on a 10-speed bicycle at Drexel University and pedaled briskly yesterday. He wasn't going anywhere, but the table-saw blade attached to his bike's rear wheel zipped handily through a two-by-four. A table saw attached to a bicycle may sound like the answer to a question nobody has asked. "But if you're living in the hinterlands of Haiti or Africa - and an electric saw would cost half a year's salary - this is a lot better than some piece of complex high technology that would work beautifully here but not there," explained Drexel engineering professor William Zuspan, one of the university's experts in the burgeoning new field of "appropriate technology.
NEWS
March 16, 2002 | By JONATHAN ZITTRAIN
THE TOP executives of two powerful media companies traveled to Washington last month to tell Congress about the most dangerous threat they face: the American consumer. Michael Eisner, chief executive of Disney, complained that the technology industry made it too easy for "people wanting to get anything for free on their television or computer or hand-held device. " Peter Chernin, head of News Corp., worried that the Internet's "ability to empower the general public" would lead to the online theft of some of the media companies' digital treasuries.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | Leonard Pitts Jr
Steve Blake of the Los Angeles Lakers missed what would have been the winning shot in a critical game. His wife got death threats.   Singer John Legend's fiancee, Chrissy Teigen, criticized singer Chris Brown's performance on an awards show. She got death threats. Clint Eastwood's daughter Francesca publicly destroyed a $100,000 purse as a piece of performance art. She got death threats. A conservative teenage activist from North Carolina posted a video supporting her state's constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage.
NEWS
September 7, 2011
By Amy B. Jordan Like many parents, I am making my back-to-school "to-do" list, and one thing I have already crossed off: sending in the paperwork for my 11th grader to receive a free laptop computer from her public high school. In my home, this is something we hardly "need" (although my daughter would disagree). But for the fraction of Lower Merion High School kids who can't afford it, the school's one-laptop-per-child program levels the playing field. It also shows how valuable educators feel computers and Internet access are to children's school achievement.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
It's a scene that might be repeated dozens of times on Drexel University's campus today: A student, sitting at a table, eating pizza. But Annie Feng is different. The sophomore nibbles on a mini pizza while wearing a headband designed to measure her brain activity. And unlike many brain-imaging machines, this device can be used at a table. By monitoring the brains of people during meals, researchers hope to learn about the cognitive aspects of eating, and why some people stop at a single slice while others devour the pie. This portable device has sparked the interest of researchers worldwide.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1998 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Pennsylvania's Department of Education analyzed the results of the first statewide public-school technology survey, one key finding emerged. The most advanced districts were led by superintendents who were strong technology supporters, according to the survey of every school district in the state. "I think the biggest surprise is that location and the amount of money a school district receives does not dictate that a school district is advanced technologically," said John P. Bailey, who directs the department's office of educational technology.
NEWS
August 18, 1999
Instead of letting the rinse water from your clotheswasher go down the drain, use buckets to catch the water from the drain hose. You'll get several gallons for trees and gardens that way. (Don't use water that has bleach in it.) Bill Jones Ridley Park Have suggestions on how to save water? Call 215-854-5060, and we'll print the best ones.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
The Delaware County Chamber of Commerce and the Pennsylvania Institute of Technology are co-sponsoring free technology workshops for business people and educators. Workshops in office and computer technologies, computer-aided drafting and manufacturing processes will be offered from 9 a.m. to noon next Thursday, Aug. 5 and Sept. 15 at the Pennsylvania Institute of Technology, 800 Manchester Ave., Rose Valley. The workshops were developed by the Business/Education Partnership Committee of the chamber.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2000 | Daily News Staff Report
Russell J. Nicolosi has been named vice president systems/technology and prepress at Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., publisher of the Daily News and the Philadelphia Inquirer. Nicolosi was chosen after an extensive national search. "I think Russ is an ideal executive to lead our systems and technology efforts," said John Walsh, PNI senior vice president, operations. "He brings a blend of industry and outside work experience to PNI and that will be helpful in our efforts to grow our business.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Technology set to replace an abandoned virtual fence plan at the Mexican border will take at least another decade before it is fully in place. Richard Stana, director of homeland security and justice issues for the Government Accountability Office, said Tuesday the new cameras, radar and other technology will start to be deployed in Arizona in the next two years but likely won't be fully in place across the 2,000-mile border until at least 2021, and possibly not until 2026.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Rayman Solomon went to Wills Eye Hospital and cataract surgeon Mark Blecher hoping for just a sip of the fountain of youth. A 69-year-old dean emeritus at the Rutgers-Camden Law School, Solomon isn't one to indulge in fantasy. But Blecher says a recently developed lens he surgically implanted in Solomon's left eye less than two weeks ago could bring him closer to the vision he had as a youth than anything previously available. "We're using very fancy tricks of optics to re-create the physiology of a 20-year-old," said Blecher, who has been practicing for almost 30 years.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Latest in an occasional series about recruiters The employees that advertising agencies want most don't exist. Employers want digital strategists with 10 to 12 years' experience, "but they aren't going to find anyone, because the field hasn't been around that long," said advertising recruiter Ginger Kochmer. "There's a shortage of good talent," said Kochmer, who leads the Creative Group in Philadelphia, a specialty recruiting agency within Robert Half International, the worldwide human resource consulting firm.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2016
Safeguard Scientifics Inc., Wayne, has hired Martina F. Aufiero as senior vice president and managing director, technology. She had been managing director and head of corporate development for a New York-based financial technology firm, Tradeweb. Tompkins VIST Bank, Wyomissing, Pa., has hired Joe Cavallo as manager of its new Pottstown branch. He had been assistant branch manager at National Penn Bank. Penn Community Bank, Doylestown, has hired Jacklyn M. Bingaman as senior vice president, director of marketing.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
The University of Pennsylvania Health System plans a new office tower at the current site of a mostly empty lot at 3600 Civic Center Blvd. to be built in phases beginning in early 2017, an official said. The 540,000-square-foot, 18-story Center for Healthcare Technology building is to be constructed beside an existing patient parking garage that opened in 2015, Penn Medicine spokeswoman Susan Phillips said in an e-mail on Wednesday. The building's first phase of construction will result in a 250,000-square-foot, eight-story office building for Penn Medicine corporate functions, including information technology and human resources, and a childcare center for the institution's employees, Phillips said.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Joseph Jaafari, STAFF WRITER
A new college ranking has declared the University of Pennsylvania one of the top places in the United States to study computer science. The rankings by College Choice put Penn at No. 15 out of 50 schools nationwide for undergraduate degrees in computer science. Penn scored 88.35 on a scale of 0 to 100. The report lauded the university's Center for Human Modeling and Simulation - which animates human movement for medical research - as a top selling point, and said that students who graduate from Penn's program typically get entry-level jobs starting at $60,000.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Engineers and machinists have built war helicopters in Delaware County since vertical-lift pioneer Frank Piasecki opened his shop in Sharon Hill, after making a Navy prototype in World War II. Will successor Boeing Corp.'s helicopter plant in Ridley Township - the Philadelphia area's top remaining industrial employer - keep its place as a leading military contractor, as drones and robotic warfare start to replace human fighters? Nearly 5,000 Boeing employees will build 50 $30 million Chinook helicopters for the U.S. and foreign armies, and 21 fuselages for $70 million-plus Ospreys for the U.S. Marines this year.
NEWS
June 16, 2016
By Jeremi Suri Terrorism on American soil is not new. Nor are crimes of hate. Since at least the 19th century, politically motivated citizens have used violence to kill for a purpose. What makes the horrible massacre in Orlando stand out is its connection to a more recent phenomenon - the murder of large numbers by a single attacker. Even though gun ownership has always been widespread in American society, premeditated murder of innocent mass crowds has only become common during the past 20 or so years.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The Please Touch Museum, which emerged debt-free from bankruptcy in March, received grant of $750,000 to be paid over two years from the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, the Philadelphia children's museum said Wednesday. The Pew money will be used to help expand the museum's reach to children 10 and older by researching and developing ways to integrate digital technology into Please Touch's traditional hands-on learning approach. In the first phase of research, the museum will use 1,000 square feet of existing exhibit space to pilot new exhibits that incoroporate digital elements, while examining the "motivations and concerns of parents regarding the use of media as part of their children's education and entertainment experiences," Please Touch said.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Borromeo String Quartet violinist Nicholas Kitchen expands on his thoughts about the intersection of classical music and emerging technology. Do you think it is inevitable that printed music will go away or perhaps become a quaint old rarity?   Let me consider a slightly different question as a prelude to answering the main question: What are the benefits reading music from PDF files instead of paper? Let's just consider that basically most everyone on earth has or is trying to get a computer, tablet, or smartphone, as well as access to the internet.
NEWS
April 12, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Wearing a high-tech prosthetic hand, Eric Young grabbed hold of a Saltine. Crunch. The hand's rubbery, motorized fingers closed too quickly, and that's the way the cracker crumbled. Then engineer Kelsey Muller flipped a switch, activating pressure-sensitive electronics so that when Young tried it again, the fingers would slow down at just the right moment. Presto! Cracker intact. "What we're doing is replicating the natural reflex," Muller said. Her demonstration was one of more than a dozen Sunday afternoon at a Philadelphia symposium on an emerging technology called haptics.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|