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Technology

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NEWS
December 8, 1987 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. William H. Gray 3d sat on a 10-speed bicycle at Drexel University and pedaled briskly yesterday. He wasn't going anywhere, but the table-saw blade attached to his bike's rear wheel zipped handily through a two-by-four. A table saw attached to a bicycle may sound like the answer to a question nobody has asked. "But if you're living in the hinterlands of Haiti or Africa - and an electric saw would cost half a year's salary - this is a lot better than some piece of complex high technology that would work beautifully here but not there," explained Drexel engineering professor William Zuspan, one of the university's experts in the burgeoning new field of "appropriate technology.
NEWS
March 16, 2002 | By JONATHAN ZITTRAIN
THE TOP executives of two powerful media companies traveled to Washington last month to tell Congress about the most dangerous threat they face: the American consumer. Michael Eisner, chief executive of Disney, complained that the technology industry made it too easy for "people wanting to get anything for free on their television or computer or hand-held device. " Peter Chernin, head of News Corp., worried that the Internet's "ability to empower the general public" would lead to the online theft of some of the media companies' digital treasuries.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | Leonard Pitts Jr
Steve Blake of the Los Angeles Lakers missed what would have been the winning shot in a critical game. His wife got death threats.   Singer John Legend's fiancee, Chrissy Teigen, criticized singer Chris Brown's performance on an awards show. She got death threats. Clint Eastwood's daughter Francesca publicly destroyed a $100,000 purse as a piece of performance art. She got death threats. A conservative teenage activist from North Carolina posted a video supporting her state's constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage.
NEWS
September 7, 2011
By Amy B. Jordan Like many parents, I am making my back-to-school "to-do" list, and one thing I have already crossed off: sending in the paperwork for my 11th grader to receive a free laptop computer from her public high school. In my home, this is something we hardly "need" (although my daughter would disagree). But for the fraction of Lower Merion High School kids who can't afford it, the school's one-laptop-per-child program levels the playing field. It also shows how valuable educators feel computers and Internet access are to children's school achievement.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1998 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Pennsylvania's Department of Education analyzed the results of the first statewide public-school technology survey, one key finding emerged. The most advanced districts were led by superintendents who were strong technology supporters, according to the survey of every school district in the state. "I think the biggest surprise is that location and the amount of money a school district receives does not dictate that a school district is advanced technologically," said John P. Bailey, who directs the department's office of educational technology.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
It's a scene that might be repeated dozens of times on Drexel University's campus today: A student, sitting at a table, eating pizza. But Annie Feng is different. The sophomore nibbles on a mini pizza while wearing a headband designed to measure her brain activity. And unlike many brain-imaging machines, this device can be used at a table. By monitoring the brains of people during meals, researchers hope to learn about the cognitive aspects of eating, and why some people stop at a single slice while others devour the pie. This portable device has sparked the interest of researchers worldwide.
NEWS
August 18, 1999
Instead of letting the rinse water from your clotheswasher go down the drain, use buckets to catch the water from the drain hose. You'll get several gallons for trees and gardens that way. (Don't use water that has bleach in it.) Bill Jones Ridley Park Have suggestions on how to save water? Call 215-854-5060, and we'll print the best ones.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
The Delaware County Chamber of Commerce and the Pennsylvania Institute of Technology are co-sponsoring free technology workshops for business people and educators. Workshops in office and computer technologies, computer-aided drafting and manufacturing processes will be offered from 9 a.m. to noon next Thursday, Aug. 5 and Sept. 15 at the Pennsylvania Institute of Technology, 800 Manchester Ave., Rose Valley. The workshops were developed by the Business/Education Partnership Committee of the chamber.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2000 | Daily News Staff Report
Russell J. Nicolosi has been named vice president systems/technology and prepress at Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., publisher of the Daily News and the Philadelphia Inquirer. Nicolosi was chosen after an extensive national search. "I think Russ is an ideal executive to lead our systems and technology efforts," said John Walsh, PNI senior vice president, operations. "He brings a blend of industry and outside work experience to PNI and that will be helpful in our efforts to grow our business.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Technology set to replace an abandoned virtual fence plan at the Mexican border will take at least another decade before it is fully in place. Richard Stana, director of homeland security and justice issues for the Government Accountability Office, said Tuesday the new cameras, radar and other technology will start to be deployed in Arizona in the next two years but likely won't be fully in place across the 2,000-mile border until at least 2021, and possibly not until 2026.
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NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Every so often, airport screening personnel around the world have been greeted by a strange sight: A tall, red-haired Englishman carrying a clear plastic box with thin tubes and pulleys nestled inside. "Yes, I have had some interesting experiences with that," said Jason Launders, explaining his invention as he sat in a windowless lab in Plymouth Meeting. "Try to explain it to a bunch of Germans. " The scientist created the motorized contraption, which the ECRI Institute uses to test the accuracy of high-tech CT scanners around the world by imitating the function of the human heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The play begins with a disembodied head, tastefully parked in the middle of a table, amiably conversing with some sort of technician - in what could be a Samuel Beckett play or the sci-fi film The Brain That Wouldn't Die . But that isn't InterAct Theatre's style. No, this was the latest new work by resident playwright Thomas Gibbons ( Permanent Collection , etc.) titled Uncanny Valley - an important exploration of the technological possibilities of immortality. It opened Wednesday at the Adrienne, traveling similar territory as Caryl Churchill's A Number (about cloning)
REAL_ESTATE
February 23, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Last week, I talked about trends associated with the winners of the National Association of Home Builders' Best in American Living Awards. Today's topic: the results of Better Homes & Gardens' annual survey of its readership, which I have been writing about, seriously or tongue-in-cheek, for the last seven years, although its informal version was part of a panel discussion at the builders group's annual trade shows for much longer than that....
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a growing body of innovative original productions, from House of Cards and Lilyhammer to Orange Is the New Black and Marco Polo , Netflix has proven it deserves a place in the vanguard of TV programming. Yet the streaming site's most buzzed-about offering this month isn't one of its own shows. It's the British import Black Mirror , a sci-fi anthology series whose six one-hour episodes have driven critics and sci-fi geeks to distraction with passionate praise.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now that Apple Inc. has hooked the world on smartphones that pack voice calls, Internet, video, cameras, antennas, sensors, and chargers in smooth pocket boxes, engineers are busy finding ways to unpack those features and make them disappear - into clothing, eyeglasses, and other "wearable" systems. Consumers will buy an estimated 19 million wearable computers this year: fitness trackers like Fitbit , wrist computers like Pebble Smartwatch , "augmented- reality" video-game helmets, Google Glass optical computers, and more on the way, says a report by Ramon Llamas , mobile analyst at International Data Corp.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
If someone had a chance to ask Bill Gates one question in all the world, what would it be? Dafni Pratt, 16, a junior at Carver High School for Engineering and Science, got that chance during a video chat Wednesday at her school. With 30 other students looking on, Pratt asked the country's richest man, who led in putting computers into the hands of everyday folks, about the lack of women in computer science. "Studies show that the percentage of women majoring in computer science has been falling since 1986," the teen from Southwest Philadelphia said.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
I remember yearning to read the comics in the Sunday paper. But the hieroglyphs inside the speech balloons remained inscrutable, until - on a sunny morning in Miss O'Shea's class - I finally grasped that a-n-d on the page and "and" in conversation meant the same thing. A eureka moment for Brian Meersma arrived when his grandfather read aloud from the book the severely dyslexic boy, then in seventh grade, was having to decipher, word by laborious word. "I said something like, 'I didn't know this was such a good book!
NEWS
November 24, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
The beach resort area of Cape May County may be angling to become a hot spot for drone testing. But plans for unmanned aircraft systems experimentation have yet to get off the ground at the county airport in the Erma section of Lower Township and at the Coast Guard Training Center in Cape May. Testing was delayed over the summer to protect the nesting and migratory patterns of threatened bird species, including the piping plover and the red knot....
NEWS
September 17, 2014
APPLE'S RELEASE of the Apple Watch and iPhone6 makes it clear that Silicon Valley's future will be directly tied to its ability to protect tech users' privacy. Securing Americans' personal information in an increasingly tech-dominated world has to be a higher priority for tech leaders and the valley's congressional and legislative delegations. Their failures up to now have left them, shall we say, exposed to the point of embarrassment. The confidence Apple executives expressed in their ability to protect customers' private information would be more believable if the whole world hadn't just seen nude photos of Jennifer Lawrence and other celebrities courtesy of hackers who broke into supposedly secure private Apple accounts.
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's getting harder to find the line between science and science fiction. One of the hot research techniques these days, "optogenetics," uses gene therapy to deliver light-sensitive proteins to specific cells. Then researchers use light to control the cells. The field got its start in the brain, where scientists have demonstrated the technique by making contented mice fly into a rage - a remarkable, if slightly creepy, achievement. Brian Chow, a University of Pennsylvania bioengineer, has bigger ambitions than that.
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