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NEWS
August 12, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM & CATHERINE LUCEY, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
MAYOR NUTTER was expected to announce today that he has appointed New Jersey's chief innovation officer, Adel Ebeid, as the city's first chief innovation officer. Slated to start Aug. 22, Ebeid will be responsible for developing and managing strategy and daily operations of all technology and information services. The position was known as chief technology officer when the former head of the Division of Technology, Allan Frank, departed in February. He oversaw a consolidation of the city's information-technology operations.
NEWS
December 20, 1986
One of the sides to a Dec. 7 article on the Strategic Defense Initiative, "Star Wars," notes the benefits the research will have in developing technology for everyday uses and everyday folks. The last big technology-overload period, the effort to put a man on the moon, did in fact create an abundance of technology for everyday uses. One of the most notable is Teflon. Since our President has benefited so greatly from that discovery, it is no surprise that he is willing to risk the future of the human race.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Guy Grady Garrison, 85, of Radnor, professor and dean emeritus at the iSchool, Drexel's College of Information Science and Technology, died Monday, May 13, of heart failure at his home. "Since joining the college as professor and dean in 1968, Dr. Garrison was an integral leader, mentor, and friend of the Drexel community," the university said in a statement on its website. He served as dean for 19 years, until 1987, when he became the first Alice B. Kroeger Professor. He retired in 1992.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
The eyes simply couldn't ignore Ameet Shah's toes. They were just so unexpected in the all-business, nothing-out-of-place office of Anthony DiFabio, chief executive officer of Robins' Nest Inc., a Glassboro nonprofit organization that helps troubled children and their families in South Jersey. And they were so obvious. Shah was wearing flip-flops - odd attire for a company executive such as himself, and yet his year-round footwear choice unless a client objects. DiFabio wasn't objecting - he was too busy raving about the services Robins' Nest is getting from Conigent, the Haddonfield-based technology-consulting company Shah formed in 2007.
NEWS
August 1, 1992 | JIM MacMILLAN/ DAILY NEWS
Stuart Sanderson speaks using a voice-synthesized computer attached to his wheelchair at the closing ceremony yesterday for Temple University's Summer Institute. The program provides classroom and mentoring instruction to persons with disabilities and features information on high-technology help for overcoming impediments.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Rowing shells began to line Kelly Drive yesterday as crews prepared for the Dad Vail Regatta, which runs today and tomorrow on the Schuylkill. Varsity eights from the Florida Institute of Technology (men's) and Minnesota (women's) will try to defend their 1988 titles in the featured event.
NEWS
June 27, 2005 | By Anthony S. Twyman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Snyder Jr., 16, a varsity basketball player at Overbrook High School, admits that he was more interested in fun than science when he signed up for the school robotics team. "I was going up there to see the girls," Snyder said of the program. Nearly a year later, however, Snyder proudly speaks of the robotic device he and his team created out of nuts and bolts. They recently won the Philadelphia BEST Robot competition and placed 27th out of 43 teams in a national competition in Alabama.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herbert S. Wilf, 80, of Penn Valley, emeritus professor of mathematics at the University of Pennsylvania, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) Saturday, Jan. 7, at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Wilf joined the Penn faculty in 1962. For him, teaching and research were deeply intertwined, his wife, Ruth Tumen Wilf, said. In 1973, Dr. Wilf received Penn's Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching, and in 1996, he received the Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo Award for excellence in teaching mathematics from the Mathematical Association of America.
REAL_ESTATE
December 31, 2000 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Technology is transforming real estate faster than just about anything has in the last 50 years. Most of the experts are saying, however, that we haven't seen anything yet. "I asked David Ruth of Coldwell Banker University how far he'd thought the industry had come," said David Horowitz of NRT Inc. in Parsippany, N.J. "Ruth said that, if we were traveling in a covered wagon from the East Coast to the West Coast, we'd only have come...
NEWS
January 4, 1996 | By Richard J. Samuels and David Friedman
Now that Congress has debated the possibility of an endless Bosnian quagmire, what the United States needs is an exit strategy from the Cold War in Asia. The outmoded U.S.-Japan alliance and increasingly contentious relations with China generate trade, technology and defense imbalances every bit as critical to the nation's future as the threat of casualties in Europe. What's needed is an economic and security regime for current realities. That's the message of a new, but largely ignored report on U.S.-Japan security by the National Research Council's Defense Task Force, a team of university, public-policy and private-sector experts who evaluated the security consequences of U.S. science and technology policies toward Asia.
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