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BUSINESS
February 13, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Metals manufacturer Carpenter Technology Corp. plans to relocate its headquarters to Philadelphia from Wyomissing, Berks County, to increase contact with its customers, the company said in a statement Thursday. Carpenter, which produces and distributes titanium alloys and other premium metals, said it is in the process of reviewing Philadelphia locations for its approximately 100-person headquarters office. Nearly 2,300 staffers will remain at a Reading facility near the company's current headquarters after the move, which the company aims to complete in late 2016.
NEWS
January 4, 2016
Joyce Eisenberg and Ellen Scolnic are known as the Word Mavens and are the authors of the "Dictionary of Jewish Words" Every now and then, we find ourselves asking questions that prove we're not as hip or as with it as we think we are. And undoubtedly, when our kids read this, they'll tell us that nobody says hip or with it anymore. We love new apps, gadgets, and conveniences, and we marvel at the things they can do, but we don't fully trust them. We spent decades dialing the phone, putting family photos in albums, and getting up from our chair to change the channel.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
Standing in the center of an abandoned Montgomery County parking lot Saturday morning, seven strangers huddled around a small remote control and waited. "All right, take control now," urged Brian Ozga as he handed the device off. "Just not too fast. " Five yards away, a small, X-shaped drone blinked red, then green, and whirred to life, jumping 10 feet off the ground. For a moment, it glided peacefully, propellers slicing the sky. Then it dipped. Lurched. And finally regained altitude as the crowd below looked on. At this unlikely meeting spot on a cold weekend morning, a local mayor, an Ecuadoran researcher, and a sailing instructor, among others, were united by just one thing: their desire to learn - formally - about drones.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
What will 2016 bring in the way of medical advances? As president and CEO of Philadelphia's University City Science Center, an incubator of medical research, Stephen Tang has an uncommon vantage point on that question. He predicts gene therapy, an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease, and health information technology will boom this year. He spoke to us recently about the center and what lies ahead.   Tell us more about the Science Center.
NEWS
November 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard J. Biscardi, 45, of Jim Thorpe, Pa., an Internet technology innovator and Philadelphia native, died Friday, Nov. 13, of injuries sustained in an auto accident in Penn Forest Township, Carbon County. Mr. Biscardi was alone in his car just before 8 p.m. when the vehicle left the right side of Behrens Road and struck a tree, according to state police at Lehighton. No other cars were involved. The accident was under investigation. Born in 1970, Mr. Biscardi, known as "Richie," grew up in the shadow of Veterans Stadium in South Philadelphia and lived in the city until moving to Jim Thorpe this summer.
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - In 2002, New Jersey became the first state in the nation to pass a law requiring all firearms retailers to sell "smart guns" instead of traditional handguns once the technology became available. On Thursday, the Democratic lawmakers who spearheaded that effort acknowledged that it had backfired by roiling gun-rights groups and impeding the technology from coming to market. So on Thursday, they introduced legislation they presented as a compromise: It would repeal the section of the law that would prohibit the sale of normal handguns but also require wholesale or retail dealers to offer and maintain an inventory of smart guns.
SPORTS
September 30, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
They were just unpacking the GPS devices from the boxes in Penn's basketball offices. For their cars? No, for practice. Every Quakers men's hoops player is going to get a tracking device for the back of his jersey. It weighs about an ounce. "I don't know if we're allowed to wear them in games or not," said men's basketball coach Steve Donahue. "We're trying to figure that out. " Miles toiled will be added to a database that closely monitors sleep and nutrition and - here's where things really get state-of-the-art - individual traits such as load and explode and drive abilities.
NEWS
September 2, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Just how does FedEx track millions of packages - and can the same technology be adapted, as Gov. Christie said over the weekend, to track visitors who overstay their visas? "If FedEx can do it, why can't we use the same technology to do it?" Christie, a Republican presidential candidate, told an interviewer over the weekend as he joined the debate over border controls. FedEx declined to comment on Monday on Christie's remarks, but a former executive at the company described its tracking system as commonplace.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Every so often, airport screening personnel around the world have been greeted by a strange sight: A tall, red-haired Englishman carrying a clear plastic box with thin tubes and pulleys nestled inside. "Yes, I have had some interesting experiences with that," said Jason Launders, explaining his invention as he sat in a windowless lab in Plymouth Meeting. "Try to explain it to a bunch of Germans. " The scientist created the motorized contraption, which the ECRI Institute uses to test the accuracy of high-tech CT scanners around the world by imitating the function of the human heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The play begins with a disembodied head, tastefully parked in the middle of a table, amiably conversing with some sort of technician - in what could be a Samuel Beckett play or the sci-fi film The Brain That Wouldn't Die . But that isn't InterAct Theatre's style. No, this was the latest new work by resident playwright Thomas Gibbons ( Permanent Collection , etc.) titled Uncanny Valley - an important exploration of the technological possibilities of immortality. It opened Wednesday at the Adrienne, traveling similar territory as Caryl Churchill's A Number (about cloning)
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