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BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic, and Egalet Corp. thinks it can help. The Wayne company has developed technology that makes it harder for prescription painkillers to be altered for a quick high. The company's "abuse-deterrent" technology arrives at an auspicious time; the federal government is calling for stricter guidelines governing the distribution of opioids, and many companies are trying to find the right niche as new rules are developed. Egalet is one of more than a dozen companies working on abuse-deterrent formulations of oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine, and its stock has been on a wild ride.
NEWS
March 31, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
New Media Technology Charter School, which has had a troubled history, has announced that it will close in June rather than continue to fight to remain open in the face of allegations of poor test scores and financial problems. It will be an ironic end for a charter that opened in 2004 with initial support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and promises to teach students digital media skills. But the school later made headlines when its founding board president and founding CEO were sent to prison on federal fraud charges.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
This is about college students and beer. What results isn't a hangover, but a $10,000 prize and a chance to drastically improve the economics of the beer industry. The key to such a toast-worthy impact? Speeding up the fermentation process of beer by about three times. If it works for beer, it could work for yogurt and other food involving fermentation. But that's getting far ahead of what is verified so far, cautioned David Issadore, an assistant professor of bioengineering and electrical and systems engineering at the University of Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Metals manufacturer Carpenter Technology Corp. plans to relocate its headquarters to Philadelphia from Wyomissing, Berks County, to increase contact with its customers, the company said in a statement Thursday. Carpenter, which produces and distributes titanium alloys and other premium metals, said it is in the process of reviewing Philadelphia locations for its approximately 100-person headquarters office. Nearly 2,300 staffers will remain at a Reading facility near the company's current headquarters after the move, which the company aims to complete in late 2016.
NEWS
January 4, 2016
Joyce Eisenberg and Ellen Scolnic are known as the Word Mavens and are the authors of the "Dictionary of Jewish Words" Every now and then, we find ourselves asking questions that prove we're not as hip or as with it as we think we are. And undoubtedly, when our kids read this, they'll tell us that nobody says hip or with it anymore. We love new apps, gadgets, and conveniences, and we marvel at the things they can do, but we don't fully trust them. We spent decades dialing the phone, putting family photos in albums, and getting up from our chair to change the channel.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
What will 2016 bring in the way of medical advances? As president and CEO of Philadelphia's University City Science Center, an incubator of medical research, Stephen Tang has an uncommon vantage point on that question. He predicts gene therapy, an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease, and health information technology will boom this year. He spoke to us recently about the center and what lies ahead.   Tell us more about the Science Center.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
Standing in the center of an abandoned Montgomery County parking lot Saturday morning, seven strangers huddled around a small remote control and waited. "All right, take control now," urged Brian Ozga as he handed the device off. "Just not too fast. " Five yards away, a small, X-shaped drone blinked red, then green, and whirred to life, jumping 10 feet off the ground. For a moment, it glided peacefully, propellers slicing the sky. Then it dipped. Lurched. And finally regained altitude as the crowd below looked on. At this unlikely meeting spot on a cold weekend morning, a local mayor, an Ecuadoran researcher, and a sailing instructor, among others, were united by just one thing: their desire to learn - formally - about drones.
NEWS
November 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard J. Biscardi, 45, of Jim Thorpe, Pa., an Internet technology innovator and Philadelphia native, died Friday, Nov. 13, of injuries sustained in an auto accident in Penn Forest Township, Carbon County. Mr. Biscardi was alone in his car just before 8 p.m. when the vehicle left the right side of Behrens Road and struck a tree, according to state police at Lehighton. No other cars were involved. The accident was under investigation. Born in 1970, Mr. Biscardi, known as "Richie," grew up in the shadow of Veterans Stadium in South Philadelphia and lived in the city until moving to Jim Thorpe this summer.
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - In 2002, New Jersey became the first state in the nation to pass a law requiring all firearms retailers to sell "smart guns" instead of traditional handguns once the technology became available. On Thursday, the Democratic lawmakers who spearheaded that effort acknowledged that it had backfired by roiling gun-rights groups and impeding the technology from coming to market. So on Thursday, they introduced legislation they presented as a compromise: It would repeal the section of the law that would prohibit the sale of normal handguns but also require wholesale or retail dealers to offer and maintain an inventory of smart guns.
SPORTS
September 30, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
They were just unpacking the GPS devices from the boxes in Penn's basketball offices. For their cars? No, for practice. Every Quakers men's hoops player is going to get a tracking device for the back of his jersey. It weighs about an ounce. "I don't know if we're allowed to wear them in games or not," said men's basketball coach Steve Donahue. "We're trying to figure that out. " Miles toiled will be added to a database that closely monitors sleep and nutrition and - here's where things really get state-of-the-art - individual traits such as load and explode and drive abilities.
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