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NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Before his 2005 move to Charlottesville, Va., where he died Monday, Feb. 3, at age 90, University of Pennsylvania professor Thomas P. Hughes was a familiar presence in Chestnut Hill, bicycling to and from the early service at the Church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, or buying crackers and cheese for the intimate gatherings of neighbors and Penn colleagues he hosted at his house on Millman Street. It wasn't just any house. Dr. Hughes' home was that icon of modern architecture known as "Mother's House," designed by Robert Venturi for his mother, Vanna.
SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
Second in a series BOSTON - When the Flyers' 18 non-Olympians returned to the ice for practice on March 19 after an NHL-mandated 10-day break, the veterans organized a little team activity to see who fell out of shape the quickest on vacation. They called it a battle for the "Green Jacket," in reference to the Masters prize, since the "winner" likely spent too much time on the golf course during the break. A decade ago, the Flyers' least conditioned player would likely have been chosen subjectively - by a kangaroo court of vets judging simply with their eyes.
REAL_ESTATE
March 3, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A visitor was asking Toll Bros. CEO Douglas Yearley about the location of property in another state. Instead of trying to describe it, Yearley called to his assistant and asked her to get Google Earth up and running in the conference room where he and the visitor were sitting. In an instant, Yearley was able to click his mouse a couple of times, and the location, including a tennis court, was clearly in view - yet another example of how technology has transformed, and continues to change, the way builders and real estate agents do business day to day. Obviously, as marketing director George Polgar of Local Development Co. in Northern Liberties emphasized, finding and acquiring locations for residential, commercial and industrial development "still requires a street-level knowledge of places where growth is likely.
SPORTS
February 3, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The way people have been talking, you would think that the decision to host the Super Bowl for the first time in a part of the country that is merely moderately football-obsessed, and to hold it in a non-domed stadium in the depths of winter, was an extreme fluke. But the Philadelphia architects who designed MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., always knew that they would be creating a custom stage for America's biggest sporting event. As in football itself, the most important criterion for attracting the Super Bowl was size.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Until now, America's most glamorous tech companies have largely been housed in suburban oases, velvet prisons that offer employees endless supplies of vitamin water and protein bars, but require lengthy commutes in company caravans from San Francisco to the cluttered highway strips of Silicon Valley. There's plenty of interaction inside the bubble, but hardly any with the wider world. With its new 1,121-foot-tall loft building, designed by Britain's Norman Foster, Comcast fashions a rebuttal to all that.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - In only a few years, smartphones and tablets have dramatically altered how people connect with one another via the Internet. This year's International Consumer Electronics Show, which opens here Tuesday, illustrates how the next frontier centers on using the Web to connect devices. The long-heralded "Internet of things" is finally taking center stage. Interconnected devices were everywhere this weekend as journalists and bloggers got an early look at some of the 3,200 exhibitors expected to draw 150,000 visitors to the massive show.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
What if you could explore and conduct research on the floor of the Grand Canyon, or examine archaeological sites underneath the Vatican, without ever leaving the Philadelphia region? By next fall, those kinds of experiences and many more will be available to students and the broader community inside a virtual-reality enclosure off the lobby of Villanova University's Falvey Library. The project is known as a CAVE, which stands for Cave Automated Virtual Environment. It's being developed under a $1.67 million grant from the National Science Foundation, awarded this year to a team led by computer scientist Frank Klassner.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
IBM has agreed to buy Fiberlink, a Blue Bell firm that connects companies to their field staffs through smartphones and other technology. Fiberlink's patents and its 400 employees (up from 250 two years ago) will join International Business Machines Corp., the companies said. The staff includes 150 software developers, cofounder Jim Sheward, president Chris Clark, and engineers, programmers, and salespeople at a new office opened in Center City last year in the hope of attracting recent college grads.
NEWS
November 12, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taking an entire class to Germany, Australia, and Serbia would have been, well, difficult. So Rutgers-Camden art professor Elizabeth Demaray brought contemporary artists from those countries to her class. Kind of. "Hello? Milos, can you hear us? Hello?" Demaray asked last week, leaning in toward her laptop screen, where Serbian artist Milos Tomic's face had frozen into a jumble of pixels. Tomic was the third and final artist in this semester's videoconference lecture series, a continuation of the SkypeOnArt series Demaray began in 2010 to bring international artists to campus without the costs associated with physical travel.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
It's a scene that might be repeated dozens of times on Drexel University's campus today: A student, sitting at a table, eating pizza. But Annie Feng is different. The sophomore nibbles on a mini pizza while wearing a headband designed to measure her brain activity. And unlike many brain-imaging machines, this device can be used at a table. By monitoring the brains of people during meals, researchers hope to learn about the cognitive aspects of eating, and why some people stop at a single slice while others devour the pie. This portable device has sparked the interest of researchers worldwide.
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