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NEWS
February 19, 2013 | BY MEERI KIM, For the Inquirer
Heart disease in women Does a heart attack really feel like an elephant on your chest? Not always, particularly if you are a woman. A study last year in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that women, especially those under 45, were less likely than men to have chest pain before a heart attack. Symptoms can be more subtle: nausea, fatigue, shortness of breath, and discomfort in the neck or back. Subtlety can be dangerous: For both sexes, the absence of the classic chest ache was linked to delayed hospital trips, slower care and a higher death rate.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Delaware County officials recently hired a consultant to help solve a vexing funding shortfall for the county's 911 center, they were not alone in their concern. Across Pennsylvania, local and state leaders are talking about changing the way county 911 operations are paid for. The primary source of revenue for the call centers are monthly fees charged per phone line. The bottom line, many county leaders and others say, is that those dollars are not keeping up with the cost of these ever more highly technological - not to mention expensive - systems.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard E. DeFrancesco, 68, of Chester Springs, who grew from building a radio as a boy to supporting defense, space, and medical projects with his technological knowledge, died Sunday, Feb. 3, of a heart attack at Paoli Hospital. From the start, Mr. DeFrancesco, a Philadelphia native, was curious about how things worked, so he constructed a radio from Radio Shack parts. He was instantly hooked on such pursuits, and the foundation for his engineering career was laid, his family said.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
IN TELEVISION, you get what you pay for, sooner or later. And in the case of Dish's Autohop technology - which allows DVR users to skip commercials while playing back programs from the four major networks - the price might be higher than advertised. Because those commercials we all love to hate? They pay for the "free" programming we don't want interrupted. Yes, yes, I know. "There's nothing good on network TV, anyway. " "I only watch cable. " "My dog ate my remote. " Great.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank E. LaVerghetta, 79, of Ardmore, a Philadelphia-raised electrical engineer and pioneer of early computer technology, died Thursday, Jan. 10, at Lankenau Hospital from complications of heart disease. Mr. LaVerghetta worked for 18 years for Philco and its successor, Philco-Ford Corp. In the 1950s with a group of engineers, he developed a transistorized computer, according to his brother-in-law, Robert Smargiassi. Mr. LaVerghetta was developing the computer as part of a bombing system to be used by the military, Smargiassi said.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
LAS VEGAS - Forget for a moment all the fantastical new devices on display at the Consumer Electronics Show. If you're a home-theater aficionado or just have loads of cash to burn, you may want to rush out and buy an Ultra HD TV - ignoring that there's hardly any content yet available to take advantage of the advance. But the good news is that CES 2013 also showcases trends that are welcome news for the rest of us, technophiles and technophobes alike. Here are three quick picks: Focus on simplicity.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than any other vital organ offered for transplant, the lung is susceptible to injury that is difficult to prevent, detect, and predict. To err on the side of caution, 80 percent of organ donors' lungs are rejected as unsuitable, a waste lamented by doctors and patients alike. Now, the University of Pennsylvania and five other medical centers are testing technology aimed at improving the situation. It involves cleaning and refurbishing donor lungs while the organ "breathes" in a specially designed machine.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
The Consumer Electronics Show will turn Las Vegas into a technology wonderland next week, as 3,260 companies from around the world vie for attention from the media, the public, and potential business partners. For consumers, the show provides a window onto what's in store in the months ahead. Sometimes it's a preview of big hits, and sometimes of misses. Last year, Intel showcased a "reference design" for a light, long-lived Windows laptop billed as an alternative to tablets and to Apple's popular MacBook Air. So far, sales of Intel-based "Ultrabooks" have underwhelmed, though the technology is promising.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
Forget watching college football bowl games on TV and nursing hangovers. If you're a Philadelphian, one New Year's Day activity trumps all others. We speak, of course, of the Mummers Parade, the now-112-year-old orgy of banjos, glockenspiels, feathers and sequins that as much as anything we hold dear, symbolizes our sweetly eccentric corner of the universe. But for something that virtually defines the word "tradition," the Mummers Parade is a surprisingly evolving entity, which is likely why the relic of the horse-and-buggy era has survived into the time of Instagram and "Gangnam Style.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County's ability to accept 911 text messages this summer will lead the state with a technology advance that will better protect residents, officials said. "This is not a replacement to the ability to call. It's another option," said Freeholder Scot McCray. "I think it's going to help every community in Camden County. " Supporters say the text service would be useful to those with speech or hearing problems, or could prove crucial in circumstances - such as a burglary - where individuals are hiding and afraid to speak while seeking help.
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