CollectionsTechnology
IN THE NEWS

Technology

NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Jovan Longs-Tucker, CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL
Maybe someday, Alesia Brown joked, the futuristic Star Trek idea of instantaneously producing food items directly from an advanced computer system will come to Philadelphia's Central High School. If it does, said Brown, the teacher technology leader and computer support coordinator at Central, she would not be surprised. In the 30 years that Brown has been working with computers at Central, she has seen many changes in technology and its uses at the academic magnet high school.
SPORTS
March 31, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Marcucci knew that building the Gloucester County Institute of Technology baseball program was a major construction project. He just didn't realize that some of his first players would take such a literal approach to the job. "When we started, we had players come to practice in work boots and jeans," Marcucci said. GCIT has come a long way in seven seasons. The Cheetahs made the state tournament for the first time in 2010, won a playoff game for the first time in 2011, and reached the South Jersey Group 2 championship game in 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
If people are inside Larry Korff's Shore house in Loveladies, N.J., he can "see" them on his video camera from 72 miles away. In early spring, his summer home will "tell" him by text when the plumber stops by to turn the water back on. And never mind those days of entering a stuffy, shuttered house on a Friday night during a heat wave in August. "I can put my air conditioner on two hours before I get down to my beach house, and it'll be very comfortable when I arrive," says the businessman, 61, who also has burglary and fire alarm systems in his Wynnewood home, as well as a programmable thermostat, and sensors on the sump pump and basement walls to detect flooding.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | BY MEERI KIM, For the Inquirer
Heart disease in women Does a heart attack really feel like an elephant on your chest? Not always, particularly if you are a woman. A study last year in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that women, especially those under 45, were less likely than men to have chest pain before a heart attack. Symptoms can be more subtle: nausea, fatigue, shortness of breath, and discomfort in the neck or back. Subtlety can be dangerous: For both sexes, the absence of the classic chest ache was linked to delayed hospital trips, slower care and a higher death rate.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Delaware County officials recently hired a consultant to help solve a vexing funding shortfall for the county's 911 center, they were not alone in their concern. Across Pennsylvania, local and state leaders are talking about changing the way county 911 operations are paid for. The primary source of revenue for the call centers are monthly fees charged per phone line. The bottom line, many county leaders and others say, is that those dollars are not keeping up with the cost of these ever more highly technological - not to mention expensive - systems.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard E. DeFrancesco, 68, of Chester Springs, who grew from building a radio as a boy to supporting defense, space, and medical projects with his technological knowledge, died Sunday, Feb. 3, of a heart attack at Paoli Hospital. From the start, Mr. DeFrancesco, a Philadelphia native, was curious about how things worked, so he constructed a radio from Radio Shack parts. He was instantly hooked on such pursuits, and the foundation for his engineering career was laid, his family said.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
IN TELEVISION, you get what you pay for, sooner or later. And in the case of Dish's Autohop technology - which allows DVR users to skip commercials while playing back programs from the four major networks - the price might be higher than advertised. Because those commercials we all love to hate? They pay for the "free" programming we don't want interrupted. Yes, yes, I know. "There's nothing good on network TV, anyway. " "I only watch cable. " "My dog ate my remote. " Great.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank E. LaVerghetta, 79, of Ardmore, a Philadelphia-raised electrical engineer and pioneer of early computer technology, died Thursday, Jan. 10, at Lankenau Hospital from complications of heart disease. Mr. LaVerghetta worked for 18 years for Philco and its successor, Philco-Ford Corp. In the 1950s with a group of engineers, he developed a transistorized computer, according to his brother-in-law, Robert Smargiassi. Mr. LaVerghetta was developing the computer as part of a bombing system to be used by the military, Smargiassi said.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
LAS VEGAS - Forget for a moment all the fantastical new devices on display at the Consumer Electronics Show. If you're a home-theater aficionado or just have loads of cash to burn, you may want to rush out and buy an Ultra HD TV - ignoring that there's hardly any content yet available to take advantage of the advance. But the good news is that CES 2013 also showcases trends that are welcome news for the rest of us, technophiles and technophobes alike. Here are three quick picks: Focus on simplicity.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than any other vital organ offered for transplant, the lung is susceptible to injury that is difficult to prevent, detect, and predict. To err on the side of caution, 80 percent of organ donors' lungs are rejected as unsuitable, a waste lamented by doctors and patients alike. Now, the University of Pennsylvania and five other medical centers are testing technology aimed at improving the situation. It involves cleaning and refurbishing donor lungs while the organ "breathes" in a specially designed machine.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|