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Ted Daeschler

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NEWS
September 12, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a lumbering, wide-headed creature with tiny, close-set eyes, and it likely had to wait on a stream bottom for its prey to swim within reach. But when that happened, watch out! One powerful chomp, with fangs up to one-and-a-half inches long. . . Rest assured that this scenario comes from the distant past - 375 million years ago, more or less - but a team of scientists from Philadelphia, Harvard, and Chicago breathed new life into it late last week. They announced the discovery of this six-foot-long prehistoric predator found in a harsh rockscape 700 miles north of the Arctic Circle.
NEWS
October 14, 2009 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Y. Brown, president and chief executive officer of the Academy of Natural Sciences, will leave in January to lead the Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts, the academy announced yesterday. Ted Daeschler, a paleontologist, will serve as acting president of the museum and research institution during a national search for Brown's replacement. One of the most enduring marks from Brown's three-year tenure at the academy may be on the building itself. He commissioned a long-range plan that calls for $200 million in renovations at the red-brick facility on Logan Square, including a new research tower at the back and a light-filled atrium at the front.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When scientists announced their discovery of a prehistoric fishlike creature with muscled fins that looked a bit like legs, the media trumpeted it as a "missing link. " Cartoonists drew images of fish marching onto land. One person who was a bit uneasy amid all the acclaim in 2006 was the codiscoverer of the fossil, Edward B. "Ted" Daeschler of Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences. After years of additional study, however, and multiple return visits to the site of the discovery in the Canadian Arctic, Daeschler has edged closer to all the hype.
NEWS
December 3, 2007 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The guy at the equipment-rental place didn't quite understand at first why Ted Daeschler needed the brute force of an electric demolition hammer. The 1,400-watt power tool is the sort of thing a contractor uses to break through a concrete wall. But Daeschler would be using it to dig into an ancient formation of red sandstone in north-central Pennsylvania. "Is there buried treasure up there?" the salesman asked. The very next morning, the answer would be yes. But it was a kind of treasure that Daeschler valued more than jewels or gold.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
"Amber, we think, freezes time. " - Paleontologist Donald L. Wolberg Like those old dry bones at Dinofest, amber is also fossilized matter with a prominent position in paleontological research. "Amber is classified as a fossil because it contains traces of prehistoric life," explained Ted Daeschler, the Academy of Natural Sciences' manager for vertebrate biology. "But amber isn't a fossil in the petrified sense like dinosaur bones, because it hasn't turned into rock. " Amber is fossilized resin from wounded prehistoric trees, particularly the pine or Pinus succinifera, says the Encyclopedia Americanna.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It was 365 million years ago. Pennsylvania was tropical and swampy and below the equator. Now-extinct fish species swam in the water. The only creatures walking on the land were bugs - at least that's what scientists thought until Ted Daeschler found his amazing bone. Yesterday, the phone rang incessantly at the Academy of Natural Science as writers from the London Times, the New York Times, USA Today and elsewhere called with questions about Ted's excellent discovery. The big find is a 3-inch fossilized bone that came from one of the earliest creatures to emerge from the sea. It crawled onto the land 150 million years before the first dinosaurs.
NEWS
July 18, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Somewhere around 365 million to 385 million years ago, fish changed. Their fins grew bonier. These new appendages resembled primitive versions of limbs, and the new creatures emerged from their oceanic womb onto land. Evidence of their long-ago existence now resides in the remote and rocky terrain of the high Arctic, and Academy of Natural Science paleontologist Ted Daeschler has returned to the area this month to continue the search for fossils that will yield more clues about this ancient life.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The curators were at their desks at the New Jersey State Museum one fall day in 2012 when in walked an amateur fossil hunter with a big hunk of bone. Sea turtle, thought David Parris, a paleontologist at the museum in Trenton. Part of the animal's upper arm bone, and a big one. It looked like another turtle bone he had once seen, an ancient fragment at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. Could it be the same species? Double bingo. Turns out it was the same darned turtle.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
In recent years, the heads of the Academy of Natural Sciences have included a paleontologist, a zoologist, an oceanographer, and a physicist. This time, the institution with Thomas Jefferson's fossils and John James Audubon's birds - among its 17 million specimens - is going for the money man. Wednesday, the board of trustees announced that George W. Gephart Jr., a regional business and nonprofit leader, would be its president and chief executive...
NEWS
April 2, 2004 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From a road-cut in Northern Pennsylvania, researchers dislodged the finlike arm of an ancient creature - one that is helping reveal how our very early aquatic ancestors first dragged themselves out of the sea and colonized the land. The 365-million-year-old arm bone found by paleontologists from the Academy of Natural Sciences and the University of Chicago has some characteristics of a fin and some of an arm. It came from a creature that was about three feet long, a carnivore that lived in a swampy river delta, said Neil Shubin of the University of Chicago.
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NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When scientists announced their discovery of a prehistoric fishlike creature with muscled fins that looked a bit like legs, the media trumpeted it as a "missing link. " Cartoonists drew images of fish marching onto land. One person who was a bit uneasy amid all the acclaim in 2006 was the codiscoverer of the fossil, Edward B. "Ted" Daeschler of Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences. After years of additional study, however, and multiple return visits to the site of the discovery in the Canadian Arctic, Daeschler has edged closer to all the hype.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The curators were at their desks at the New Jersey State Museum one fall day in 2012 when in walked an amateur fossil hunter with a big hunk of bone. Sea turtle, thought David Parris, a paleontologist at the museum in Trenton. Part of the animal's upper arm bone, and a big one. It looked like another turtle bone he had once seen, an ancient fragment at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. Could it be the same species? Double bingo. Turns out it was the same darned turtle.
NEWS
September 12, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a lumbering, wide-headed creature with tiny, close-set eyes, and it likely had to wait on a stream bottom for its prey to swim within reach. But when that happened, watch out! One powerful chomp, with fangs up to one-and-a-half inches long. . . Rest assured that this scenario comes from the distant past - 375 million years ago, more or less - but a team of scientists from Philadelphia, Harvard, and Chicago breathed new life into it late last week. They announced the discovery of this six-foot-long prehistoric predator found in a harsh rockscape 700 miles north of the Arctic Circle.
NEWS
July 18, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Somewhere around 365 million to 385 million years ago, fish changed. Their fins grew bonier. These new appendages resembled primitive versions of limbs, and the new creatures emerged from their oceanic womb onto land. Evidence of their long-ago existence now resides in the remote and rocky terrain of the high Arctic, and Academy of Natural Science paleontologist Ted Daeschler has returned to the area this month to continue the search for fossils that will yield more clues about this ancient life.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In recent years, the heads of the Academy of Natural Sciences have included a paleontologist, a zoologist, an oceanographer, and a physicist. This time, the institution with Thomas Jefferson's fossils and John James Audubon's birds - among its 17 million specimens - is going for the money man. Wednesday, the board of trustees announced that George W. Gephart Jr., a regional business and nonprofit leader, would be its president and chief executive...
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
In recent years, the heads of the Academy of Natural Sciences have included a paleontologist, a zoologist, an oceanographer, and a physicist. This time, the institution with Thomas Jefferson's fossils and John James Audubon's birds - among its 17 million specimens - is going for the money man. Wednesday, the board of trustees announced that George W. Gephart Jr., a regional business and nonprofit leader, would be its president and chief executive...
NEWS
October 14, 2009 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Y. Brown, president and chief executive officer of the Academy of Natural Sciences, will leave in January to lead the Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts, the academy announced yesterday. Ted Daeschler, a paleontologist, will serve as acting president of the museum and research institution during a national search for Brown's replacement. One of the most enduring marks from Brown's three-year tenure at the academy may be on the building itself. He commissioned a long-range plan that calls for $200 million in renovations at the red-brick facility on Logan Square, including a new research tower at the back and a light-filled atrium at the front.
NEWS
December 3, 2007 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The guy at the equipment-rental place didn't quite understand at first why Ted Daeschler needed the brute force of an electric demolition hammer. The 1,400-watt power tool is the sort of thing a contractor uses to break through a concrete wall. But Daeschler would be using it to dig into an ancient formation of red sandstone in north-central Pennsylvania. "Is there buried treasure up there?" the salesman asked. The very next morning, the answer would be yes. But it was a kind of treasure that Daeschler valued more than jewels or gold.
NEWS
October 2, 2006 | By Manasee Wagh FOR THE INQUIRER
The towering Giganotosaurus standing on the front desk of Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences is as big as a SEPTA bus. A 5-foot adult could easily fit inside its jaws. It is a replica of one of the largest carnivorous dinosaurs that ever lived, bigger than the imposing Tyrannosaurus rex standing across from it. Visitors to the museum might be so taken with the skeletons and big bones in Dinosaur Alley, they might not notice the collection's "most precious gems" - 10 tiny teeth that the academy plans to unveil tomorrow evening.
NEWS
April 6, 2006 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The fishlike creature was a poor swimmer, and it lived in waters probably teeming with prehistoric sharks and scaly meat-eaters. It could easily have ended up as lunch. But Tiktaalik roseae had a leg up on the competition. With muscular fins - the beginnings of forelimbs, really - it likely was able to escape onto land. Discovery of the 375-million-year-old fossil, reported in today's edition of the journal Nature, is being called one of the clearest illustrations yet of a signature moment in the story of life: the transition from water to land.
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