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Ted Kennedy

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NEWS
August 27, 2009
TED KENNEDY was one of the few politicians in Washington who truly put his personal beliefs and views above politics. His compassion and never-ending campaign for equal rights for all Americans, big or small, no matter the color of their skin, rich or poor, will be sorely missed. Kennedy was our last best chance for real health-care reform, reform that would work for everyone, as he had respect from both sides of the aisle that no other senator has ever had or ever will have again.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1986 | By YARDENA ARAR, Los Angeles Daily News
Ted Kennedy Jr. wasn't too excited about the idea of yet another TV movie about the Kennedys - specifically himself. But a film about a 12-year-old boy who, with the help of family, friends and religious faith, overcomes the loss of a leg to cancer - that he could get into. Not only did Kennedy work with the writers of "The Ted Kennedy Jr. Story," an NBC film scheduled for broadcast Nov. 24, but he also wrote and delivered the epilog. He may also be the first Kennedy ever to participate in the promotion of a film biography.
NEWS
August 12, 1993 | BY MOLLY IVINS
Yuck, another one of those flaps about some self-identified journalist who has Gone Too Far. This time it's Joe McGinniss, whose novel masquerades as a "biography" of Edward Kennedy. And this time, the "biographer" is so far Over The Line (stop me before I capitalize again) that the only question left is whether we have some obligation to admire his chutzpah in describing this pastiche as non-fiction. I am obliged to explain that I got one of those advance galleys of the first three chapters of the McGinniss book that were circulated by his publisher, but I refuse on principle to buy the whole book.
NEWS
February 3, 2003 | MICHELLE MALKIN
SINCE it began last year, the National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS) has stopped 330 known foreign criminals and three known terrorists attempting to come into the country at official ports of entry. And the targeted registration of certain foreign nationals already here has resulted in the apprehension of 15 illegal alien felons. Naturally, Sen. Ted Kennedy, D-Afghanistan, wants to stop the Bush administration from using NSEERS to catch any more criminal and illegal aliens who pose threats to America.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the South, candidates are running hard against the senator. When they say his name, their voices drip with disgust. Big liberal spender, they sneer. King of racial quotas. Never mind that Ted Kennedy, the Democratic senator from Massachusetts, isn't up for election. Listen to Gov. Bob Martinez in Florida. In his razor-close race for re- election, Martinez declares that Lawton Chiles is a liberal like Ted Kennedy. This has a familiar ring to it. Listen to Jesse Helms in North Carolina.
NEWS
July 22, 1999 | By Michael Sokolove and Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
He was born into the family business, politics, but for many years now, the family narrative has been terrible, gut-wrenching tragedy. And Ted Kennedy has taken on roles he could never have aspired to or imagined for himself. Graceful mourner. Surrogate father. Composer of eulogies. Chaperone of bodies. Yesterday, Kennedy walked stiff-legged but briskly onto a Coast Guard vessel to be taken out to sea for the grimmest of tasks, to stand by as the bodies of John F. Kennedy Jr., the son of his slain brother; John's wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy; and her sister Lauren Bessette were pulled from the deep.
NEWS
August 7, 1993 | By RICHARD COHEN
When Jonathan Yardley, the Washington Post's book critic, calls Joe McGinniss' new biography of Ted Kennedy the worst thing he's read in "nearly three decades," he's saying something. Yardley, like all reviewers, has read books so bad, so trashy, so without literary or journalistic merit, that to single out one as the worst means that it has a quality that sets it apart. In the case of the McGinness book, it's dishonesty. The Last Brother is really in a league of its own. It not only purports to know what Ted Kennedy was thinking at this or that moment, but it also has the speechless Joseph P. Kennedy, a stroke victim, impart his earnest desire to attend the Washington funeral of his son, the slain president: "He'd seen enough of Jack's casket on television, enough of Bobby's and Jacqueline's somber but resolute expressions.
NEWS
September 8, 1993 | By ROLAND MERULLO
Let me begin by making a confession that will set me apart from many of those who have commented on Joe McGinniss' latest work: I have actually read the book. I have read it and found it to be a finely written and insightful investigation, not only of Ted Kennedy, but of the way America creates and discards its heroes, of the way American politics works and of the role the media plays in those workings. Let me make a second confession: I am a friend of McGinniss'. As has been the case with a long list of other writers, I have benefited from his kindness and generosity in the form of jacket quotes, reading time, advice and recommendations.
NEWS
April 17, 2013
By John R. Lott Jr. Everyone wants to keep criminals from getting guns. However, expanded background checks are not the simple answer that Sens. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) and Joe Manchin (D., W.Va.) think they are. Unfortunately, as the Senate considers the Manchin-Toomey amendment, Toomey is simply wrong to assert: "It's the people who fail a criminal or mental-health background check who we don't want having guns. " Toomey apparently does not understand how the background-check system works.
NEWS
August 27, 2004
I WAS AMUSED to see the ariticle in the Kerry . . . oops, I mean Daily News about Ted Kennedy being stopped at airports as a possible terrorist. In all fairness, he has killed someone, and his boy, John F. Simoes Ferierra Heinz Kennedy Kerry, has been endorsed by both North Korea AND al Qaeda, so it doesn't seem so out of line after all. Michael P. Kilhoffer Philadelphia
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MELVIN ELLIS was good at keeping secrets. A 35-year veteran of the Philadelphia Police Department, Melvin worked for many years as both a bodyguard and personal investigator for former Mayor W. Wilson Goode. What did he actually do for Goode? That was between him and the mayor. He didn't even tell his wife. He also worked with Sen. Edward Kennedy and Frank Sinatra. What did he do for them? He'd never tell. "That was why he was in such demand," said his wife, the former Suzanne Malseed.
NEWS
April 17, 2013
By John R. Lott Jr. Everyone wants to keep criminals from getting guns. However, expanded background checks are not the simple answer that Sens. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) and Joe Manchin (D., W.Va.) think they are. Unfortunately, as the Senate considers the Manchin-Toomey amendment, Toomey is simply wrong to assert: "It's the people who fail a criminal or mental-health background check who we don't want having guns. " Toomey apparently does not understand how the background-check system works.
NEWS
September 3, 2009
The recent death of Sen. Edward M. Kennedy was certainly a blow to his cherished goal of health-care reform. But it also could mean an end to the art of compromise in Congress. For all of the vitriol that the right heaped on Kennedy's liberalism, he excelled at reaching common ground with conservatives to pass legislation. There are few elected officials remaining in either party in Washington with a reputation as a deal-maker. Today is the 45th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, landmark legislation that has enabled the federal government to set aside more than 100 million acres as protected public land.
NEWS
September 3, 2009
By William C. Kashatus Last weekend, while Sen. Edward M. Kennedy was being laid to rest, I visited the grave of Mary Jo Kopechne, the 28-year-old woman who was killed when a car driven by Kennedy plunged off a bridge on Chappaquiddick Island. I visited Kopechne's grave to honor her memory and the potential that was lost on that summer evening 40 years ago. Kopechne is buried at St. Vincent's Cemetery, on Larksville Mountain in Luzerne County, Pa., just a few miles from her hometown, Forty Fort.
NEWS
September 2, 2009 | By Guy Ciarrocchi
With the passing of Ted Kennedy, Americans have taken a moment to reflect on his career and legacy. Having worked for elected officials ranging from the late Sen. John Heinz to Rep. Jim Gerlach, I have had a lifetime of experience in government. And my fellow Republicans may be surprised to learn that the first time I worked my home precinct as a volunteer was for Kennedy's 1980 presidential candidacy. But I will leave the political commentary to historians and Kennedy's colleagues.
NEWS
September 1, 2009 | By Geoff Garin
Ted Kennedy's voice and leadership will be sorely missed in the effort to pass health-care reform. But when Republicans say Democrats don't have anyone to take his place in achieving a bipartisan compromise, they are either missing - or deliberately obscuring - the relevant lesson of Kennedy's example. The truth is that Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus (D., Mont.), with the support of the White House, has worked hard for months to reach consensus with Sens. Chuck Grassley (R., Iowa)
NEWS
August 28, 2009 | By TIMOTHY NOAH
"This initial victory for Edward Kennedy is demeaning to the dignity of the Senate and the democratic process. " - New York Times editorial, "Little Brother Wins," Sept. 19, 1962 AT THE TENDER age of 30, the youngest sibling of President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy seemed pathetically unqualified to enter the U.S. Senate. He was the runt of the litter. Suspended from Harvard after he'd been caught having a football teammate take a Spanish exam for him, Ted had subsequently been steered by his father away from service in the Korean War, serving instead as a NATO honor guard in Paris, never advancing beyond private first class.
NEWS
August 28, 2009 | By E.J. Dionne
Ted Kennedy was treasured by liberals, loved by many of his conservative colleagues, revered by African Americans and Latinos, respected by hard-bitten political bosses, admired by students of the legislative process, and cherished by the finest cadre of staff members ever assembled on Capitol Hill. The Kennedy paradox is that he managed to be esteemed by almost everyone without ever becoming all things to all people. He stood for large purposes, unequivocally and unapologetically, and never ducked tough choices.
NEWS
August 27, 2009
TED KENNEDY was one of the few politicians in Washington who truly put his personal beliefs and views above politics. His compassion and never-ending campaign for equal rights for all Americans, big or small, no matter the color of their skin, rich or poor, will be sorely missed. Kennedy was our last best chance for real health-care reform, reform that would work for everyone, as he had respect from both sides of the aisle that no other senator has ever had or ever will have again.
NEWS
August 27, 2009
TEDDY KENNEDY was a prodigious fundraiser, especially for the conservatives who hated him with a consuming passion. He was the full-color villain of thousands of their direct-mail brochures. Kennedy's image, his life's work - and, it must be said, his very real personal flaws - provided excellent incentives for his enemies to contribute to the people who did battle with him. No doubt some of that money came from people whose lives had benefited from the dedication and skill of Sen. Edward Moore Kennedy, Democrat of Massachusetts.
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