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Ted Leo

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NEWS
March 30, 2007 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Ted Leo's consistent excellence is easy to take for granted. He's an astute writer of sharp political songs, a frenetic guitarist and smart arranger, a sincere and impassioned performer. Although he started in the Washington hard-core scene in Chisel, over the course of four albums with his band the Pharmacists he's delved into his love for two-tone reggae, for the second-generation mod rock of the Jam and the catchy, socially conscious punk of the Clash and Billy Bragg, and for the Irish rock of Thin Lizzy and the Pogues.
NEWS
March 26, 2003 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The whole of Hearts of Oak, the third album by Ted Leo & the Pharmacists, argues that the North Jersey songwriter is a talent too ambitious and articulate to remain a secret of the punk-rock underground much longer. But the song that closes the case is "Where Have All the Rude Boys Gone?," a roiling tribute to the British ska bands of the late '70s and early '80s - the Specials, in particular. "I was going though a Specials renaissance on my CD player," said Leo, 33, sitting on an amplifier outside the Austin Convention Center after one of his four performances at the South by Southwest music festival earlier this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
It was a night for new identities on Monday as Boot & Saddle, the long-shuttered former dive bar on South Broad Street, reopened in its new incarnation as a live music venue. The iconic boot-and-saddle neon sign has been dark for 17 years, but it continues to promise that "Country & Western" music will be heard inside. That will be the case, as bluegrass band the Highwater Preachers top an all-local bill on Wednesday night. But the room, capacity 175, will mainly be an indie-rock venue.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
What makes a collaboration work? In the case of the unexpected and seemingly unlikely one between solo acts Aimee Mann and Ted Leo, more factors are in their favor than you might think. When the duo - who headline Union Transfer as the Both on Saturday - toured together in 2012, "I started watching Ted's shows," says Mann, talking on the phone over a shared line with Leo from Brooklyn. "There was a new song of his that I really wanted to play bass on," she says. That song was "The Gambler," the first track on their new album, The Both . "So I asked to sit in. It's really interesting to hear the sound he gets with just one guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013
Sparks It makes perfect sense that for its Two Hands, One Mouth Tour, Sparks strip down to its essentials: brothers Ron (keyboards) and Russell Mael (vocals). Since 1968 (when they were named Halfnelson), it's been the Maels and whomever else they could get to share their quirky vision. From power-pop to glam to cosmopolitan art-rock to coldly repetitive electro disco, and back again, it's always Russell singing warmly caustic lyrics, with falsetto set to "stun," and Ron hammering and tickling the keys, scowling all the way. If its recently released, first-ever concert recording Two Hands One Mouth, Live In Europe is any indication, expect hyper-driven, high-pitched glitter-rock ("Propaganda," "This Town Ain't Big Enough for the Both of Us")
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2004 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When they tore down the Chicago hotel where he had worked as a bellhop for a dozen years, Ike Reilly figured it was time to make his move. And so the service industry's loss became rock-and-roll's gain. "I probably would have quit anyway," the 42-year-old father of four said from his home outside the Windy City, talking about leaving his day job for a full-time music career. "I'd consider it a risk not doing this. . . . It's the one thing I can do. " Since then, Reilly, also a former gravedigger, has attacked the music with the intensity of a guy making up for lost time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2015 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
Introspective singer-songwriter Aimee Mann and passionate punk rocker Ted Leo initially seemed an unlikely pairing, and even though their collaboration as the Both has proved to be sweet musical synergy, their putting on a Christmas show was stranger still. But Christmas songs aren't all tinsel and twinkling lights, as Leo explained when introducing "It's a Gift" at Union Transfer on Saturday. "It's largely about sadness and loss," he said, to an approving audience. "Oh, you like that?"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2002 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
Start the weekend off early with an evening of beautiful noise from Eltro, the Pearly Gates, and Hallelujah (9 tonight at the Khyber, 56 S. 2nd St., 215-238-5888, $7). After almost a decade, the Breeders, the band responsible for the best gum-cracking alt-pop tunes of the '90s and tomboy chic, are back, featuring notorious twins Kim and Kelly Deal, a new backing band, and a new record due out sometime in the 21st century. Another rocking band with a "B," Burning Brides, will open (10 p.m. tomorrow, North Star Bar, 27th and Poplar streets, 215-684-0808, $18, sold out)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2002 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
TONIGHT: Get a healthy dose of demented folk and punk-rock from the Frogs, Sand Family, Adam Brodsky, and the Walkie Talkies (9 p.m., the Khyber, 56 S. 2nd St., 215-238-5888). Ted Leo and the Pharmacists return to the now back-in-business First Unitarian Church with the French Toast (the Make-Up's James Canty and Fugazi's Jerry Busher), City of Caterpillar, and in further insect names, Butterflies of Love (7 p.m., 2125 Chestnut St., 215-629-0614, $7, all ages). Also, the church, host of other valuable community events besides all-ages punk rock shows, needs some help getting back on its feet.
NEWS
December 13, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Ted Leo is such an able songwriter - so skilled at shaping impassioned tunes that merge the personal and the political - that it's easy to overlook just how good a musician the New Jersey rocker is. But at the First Unitarian Church on Friday, it was hard to miss. With bearded backups Dave Lerner on bass and Chris Wilson on drums - together known as the Pharmacists - Leo was the clean-shaven frontman of a formidable power trio, and his attributes as an elastic-voiced singer and subtly crafty guitarist were in stark relief.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2016
Bob Mould / Ted Leo Bob Mould has been marrying melody and rage for more than three decades now, going back to his days as leader of influential Minnesota power trio Hüsker Dü, with mid-1980s masterworks such as Zen Arcade and New Day Rising . (Krist Novoselic of Nirvana once said, "Hüsker Dü did it before us. ") Among the Hüskers, his '90s band Sugar, and as a solo artist, Mould has released more than 20 studio albums. Lately, he has been on a roll, with 2012's Silver Age , 2014's Beauty & Ruin , and the dark and desperate new Patch the Sky (Merge)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2015 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
Introspective singer-songwriter Aimee Mann and passionate punk rocker Ted Leo initially seemed an unlikely pairing, and even though their collaboration as the Both has proved to be sweet musical synergy, their putting on a Christmas show was stranger still. But Christmas songs aren't all tinsel and twinkling lights, as Leo explained when introducing "It's a Gift" at Union Transfer on Saturday. "It's largely about sadness and loss," he said, to an approving audience. "Oh, you like that?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
What makes a collaboration work? In the case of the unexpected and seemingly unlikely one between solo acts Aimee Mann and Ted Leo, more factors are in their favor than you might think. When the duo - who headline Union Transfer as the Both on Saturday - toured together in 2012, "I started watching Ted's shows," says Mann, talking on the phone over a shared line with Leo from Brooklyn. "There was a new song of his that I really wanted to play bass on," she says. That song was "The Gambler," the first track on their new album, The Both . "So I asked to sit in. It's really interesting to hear the sound he gets with just one guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
It was a night for new identities on Monday as Boot & Saddle, the long-shuttered former dive bar on South Broad Street, reopened in its new incarnation as a live music venue. The iconic boot-and-saddle neon sign has been dark for 17 years, but it continues to promise that "Country & Western" music will be heard inside. That will be the case, as bluegrass band the Highwater Preachers top an all-local bill on Wednesday night. But the room, capacity 175, will mainly be an indie-rock venue.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013
Sparks It makes perfect sense that for its Two Hands, One Mouth Tour, Sparks strip down to its essentials: brothers Ron (keyboards) and Russell Mael (vocals). Since 1968 (when they were named Halfnelson), it's been the Maels and whomever else they could get to share their quirky vision. From power-pop to glam to cosmopolitan art-rock to coldly repetitive electro disco, and back again, it's always Russell singing warmly caustic lyrics, with falsetto set to "stun," and Ron hammering and tickling the keys, scowling all the way. If its recently released, first-ever concert recording Two Hands One Mouth, Live In Europe is any indication, expect hyper-driven, high-pitched glitter-rock ("Propaganda," "This Town Ain't Big Enough for the Both of Us")
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The season will be busy on stages large and small. Though the Spectrum is closed, the Wachovia Center will offer up John Mayer (Feb. 21), Black Eyed Peas (March 3), and back-to-backs with Taylor Swift (March 18-19) and Bon Jovi (March 23-24). In more intimate environs, you have the Kinks' Dave Davies at the Sellersville Theater 1894 (Feb. 9), country tough guys Eric Church and Josh Thompson at the Trocadero (Feb. 11), singer-songwriter Laura Veirs at World Cafe Live (Feb. 17), and Norwegian tunesmith Sondre Lerche at Johnny Brenda's (March 4)
NEWS
March 30, 2007 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Ted Leo's consistent excellence is easy to take for granted. He's an astute writer of sharp political songs, a frenetic guitarist and smart arranger, a sincere and impassioned performer. Although he started in the Washington hard-core scene in Chisel, over the course of four albums with his band the Pharmacists he's delved into his love for two-tone reggae, for the second-generation mod rock of the Jam and the catchy, socially conscious punk of the Clash and Billy Bragg, and for the Irish rock of Thin Lizzy and the Pogues.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2006 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
The punk band Against Me! announced its recent signing to a major label by posting this on its Web site: "Submitted for your message board disapproval: Against Me! has signed to Sire Records. Expect a new album in 2007! For real. " After three full-lengths on independent labels, including last year's terrific Searching For a Former Clarity, and a DVD that mocked the major labels that were courting it, the Gainesville, Fla., band knew that some fans would accuse it of selling out. Punk rock, especially in the minds of the young, can be a rigidly circumscribed, anti-corporate and uncompromising genre, and Tom Gabel, the growling lead singer, has thought a lot about his place in that scene.
NEWS
December 13, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Ted Leo is such an able songwriter - so skilled at shaping impassioned tunes that merge the personal and the political - that it's easy to overlook just how good a musician the New Jersey rocker is. But at the First Unitarian Church on Friday, it was hard to miss. With bearded backups Dave Lerner on bass and Chris Wilson on drums - together known as the Pharmacists - Leo was the clean-shaven frontman of a formidable power trio, and his attributes as an elastic-voiced singer and subtly crafty guitarist were in stark relief.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2004 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
Unearth some rare Lee Hazelwood treasures and performances by the Animals and Astrid Gilberto at the Secret Cinema's Sixties Pop Double Feature. On tonight's program: the 1967 rock satire "The Cool Ones" (when a go-go girl goes mad) and the 1964 teen romp "Get Yourself a College Girl" (8 tonight, Moore College of Art & Design, 20th and Race streets, 215-568-4515, ext. 4099, $6, www.thesecretcinema .com). Chris Leo (of Van Pelt and the Lapse) debuts his new band Vague Angels with brother Ted Leo & the Pharmacists and Philadelphia expat Matt Pond PA (8 tonight, First Unitarian Church, 2125 Chestnut St., 267-972-6264, $10, all ages, www.r5productions .com)
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