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Ted Williams

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NEWS
July 7, 2002
Ted Williams, who died Friday, was as good as anyone who ever lived at doing one of the hardest things in sports - hitting a round ball with a round bat. Baseball - it's just a game, and a declining one at that. But it's an old American habit to look to the diamonds of green to teach larger lessons. And the career of the Splendid Splinter - the last man to reach his sport's sacred standard of excellence, a .400 batting average - teaches a lot about excellence, what it is and is not. Excellence is not always charming or cuddly.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By David Iams, FOR THE INQUIRER
Hunt Auctions, the Exton sports-memorabilia outfit whose sales frequently take place in conjunction with major sporting events all over the country, will help Boston's Fenway Park celebrate its 100th anniversary with a sale there featuring the personal collection of Ted Williams - who spent his entire major league baseball career playing with the Red Sox. The 700-lot sale April 28 will also feature Fenway Park historic memorabilia, notably the...
NEWS
February 11, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
For years sportswriters have quoted Ted Williams as if he has the wisdom of King Solomon: "Hitting a baseball is the most difficult single act in sports. " And lately they've dragged out that statement over and over again while hooting and jeering at Michael Jordan's efforts to become a big league baseball player. How, they sneer, can Jordan expect to succeed in doing what - as the great Ted Williams said - "is the most difficult act in sports"? It doesn't ever occur to these sports pundits that maybe Ted Williams was full of beans.
SPORTS
July 21, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
It was just past midnight on May 1, 1952, when Capt. Ted Williams, recalled by the Marines during the Korean War, reported to Willow Grove Naval Air Station for refresher training. The unusual arrival hour had its purpose. Williams wanted to avoid the local press. "These Philadelphia writers," the Boston Red Sox star told a friend who'd accompanied him here, "are the worst. " Despite that assessment, it would have been a delight to cover Williams. For all his eccentricities and crudities, his stubbornness and immaturity, the Red Sox superstar was, I believe, the last honest ballplayer in America.
SPORTS
May 24, 2013 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
TED WILLIAMS is the calm hand in the middle of the revolution. The longest-tenured assistant coach in the history of the Eagles franchise, Williams arrived here as the tight ends coach in 1995 and 1996 under Ray Rhodes. Now, a lifetime later - and after 16 years coaching running backs named Ricky Watters, Duce Staley, Brian Westbrook and LeSean McCoy - Williams is coaching tight ends again in 2013 under Chip Kelly. To say that a few things are different would be an embarrassing understatement.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Stan Hochman
Ted Williams was hitting .3995 with one day left in the 1941 season, a meaningless doubleheader at Shibe Park against the Philadelphia A's. Connie Mack, the penurious owner/manager of the A's, had postponed Friday's game against Boston to create the Sunday doubleheader in hopes of drawing a decent crowd. It came back to bite him in his skimpy assets because Williams hammered a long drive in the second game that shattered a loudspeaker. Mack had to replace it and the cost came out of the gate receipts, but that is getting ahead of the story.
NEWS
July 10, 2002 | By Bill Barber
Ted Williams, the former Boston Red Sox slugger and baseball Hall of Fame member, died Friday at 83, and with him went a small but important part of my former youth. If you grew up in the Boston area in the 1940s and '50s, as I did, only one baseball team in the world mattered - the Red Sox. I, like thousands of other youngsters in the New England area, knew all about the Red Sox players, their habits, their idiosyncrasies, almost what they had for breakfast on game day. You must remember that in that era most ballplayers spent their careers with the same club, so identifying with them was very easy.
NEWS
January 14, 2011
SO, IT TURNS out that Ted Williams' redemption story was too true to be good. What looked like the road from rags to riches for the panhandler with the golden pipes was just a cul-de-sac that brought him by turns back to the beginning. Good. Because the beginning is where he needs to be. The beginning, any recovering addict will tell you, was to admit that he was powerless over his addiction. Addicts get cured every day. There is a guy living next to you or working in an adjoining cubicle who has reclaimed his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2011
YOU CAN TAKE the man off the streets, but can you take the street out of the man? I'm rooting for Ted Williams , a/k/a/ the Ohio homeless man with the golden voice. I really, really am. But I have a bad feeling about how this could wind up. The overnight fame and fortune has been too much, too soon. Williams would have been much better off getting a job as an announcer in a small local radio station in the middle of nowhere instead of making such a big splash. He needs a whole lot of counseling and time to make amends with his estranged family members - and I don't mean on TV with Dr. Phil moderating the discussion.
SPORTS
July 14, 1999 | by Paul Hagen , Daily News Sports Writer
Curt Schilling was as wound up as he'd ever been. Starting the All-Star Game for the National League. A moving pregame ceremony honoring Ted Williams, made all the more special by the fact that he was surrounded by more than two dozen of the greatest former players. A flyover by four jets that seemed to skim just above the light towers of historic Fenway Park. There was nothing, nothing, that could have made the Phillies' ace righthander more nervous than he already was. And then Boston's Pedro Martinez went out in the top of the first and struck out Barry Larkin, Larry Walker and Sammy Sosa to start the game.
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SPORTS
June 5, 2015 | By Jeff McLane and Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writers
Duce Staley was LeSean McCoy's position coach with the Eagles for two seasons. He ran behind Tra Thomas for six seasons and worked alongside him as a coach for two more. McCoy and Thomas made headlines this offseason with incendiary comments about Chip Kelly and race. McCoy, traded to the Bills in March, said that Kelly got rid of "all the good black players" the fastest. Thomas, whom the Eagles didn't bring back as an assistant, said that some players thought there was "a hint of racism" in how the team was run. The former Pro Bowl tackle also pointed out that Staley is the only remaining position coach who is African American.
SPORTS
January 21, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
MOBILE, Ala. - Bill Davis, the defensive coordinator who kept trying to single-cover star receivers with Bradley Fletcher as the Eagles slipped from the playoff picture, remains secure in his post. But the late meltdown of the Birds' secondary has claimed some victims. Last week, former Pro Bowl corner Todd Lyght, who'd assisted Eagles defensive backs coach John Lovett the past two seasons, left to coach Vanderbilt's corners. Yesterday the Eagles announced that Lovett is now a pro scout.
SPORTS
November 21, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
ZACH ERTZ sat down with his tight-end coaches, Ted Williams and Justin Peelle, in deep despair just a few weeks ago, Ertz said yesterday. Ertz's 30 catches for 430 yards and two touchdowns through 10 games aren't adding up to the breakthough year to stardom many observers predicted, the year Ertz expected of himself. In fact, Eagles coach Chip Kelly, asked yet again yesterday why Ertz isn't getting more snaps and catches, basically told reporters it's because 8-year veteran Brent Celek is still a better all-around player, and a better fit for Kelly's offense.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William D. Widerman was a starting pitcher for the Duke University baseball team and a member of the V-12 Navy College Training Program intended to produce officers during World War II. There came a time when his North Carolina college team played an exhibition game against a military team, starring no less than the Red Sox leftfielder Ted Williams, who had led the American League in homers in 1941 and 1942. The reason that the major-league star was playing against a college team, likely in 1943, is lost to Widerman family memory, but a Marines website reports that some of Williams' training to become a Marine Corps pilot took place at Chapel Hill, N.C. The Splendid Splinter made the day memorable.
SPORTS
July 21, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
It was just past midnight on May 1, 1952, when Capt. Ted Williams, recalled by the Marines during the Korean War, reported to Willow Grove Naval Air Station for refresher training. The unusual arrival hour had its purpose. Williams wanted to avoid the local press. "These Philadelphia writers," the Boston Red Sox star told a friend who'd accompanied him here, "are the worst. " Despite that assessment, it would have been a delight to cover Williams. For all his eccentricities and crudities, his stubbornness and immaturity, the Red Sox superstar was, I believe, the last honest ballplayer in America.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dan Williams said that someday he will sit back and enjoy his place at the top of the state record book. "Maybe when I'm old and have kids," Williams said. For now, the Timber Creek senior quarterback insists he's more focused on team goals than individual accomplishments. So it was left for others to rave about Williams' performance in setting a state single-game record with 532 passing yards along with six touchdown passes in a 47-13 victory over Kingsway in the South Jersey Group 4 semifinals on Friday night.
SPORTS
August 31, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Dan Williams thinks about the 2012 football season, he doesn't focus on the triumphant ending. That would be easy. Williams passed for five touchdowns as Timber Creek set a South Jersey record for points in a sectional final with a 57-27 victory over Kingsway in the South Jersey Group 4 title game. But the son of longtime Eagles assistant coach Ted Williams knows better than to bask in the glory of that sensational performance. Williams prefers to remember what it took for him to reach the mountain-top on that cold December night at Rowan University.
SPORTS
July 26, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
ST. LOUIS - Had Domonic Brown known he would miss at least two games when informing a team athletic trainer of concussion-like symptoms, he may have hidden his dizziness Tuesday night. His head had slammed into the warning-track dirt in left field when he unsuccessfully dove for a fly ball. "I feel good," Brown said a day later. "I feel like I'm back to normal, honestly. " But the Phillies outfielder cannot play until Friday at the earliest. Major League Baseball's protocol calls for extensive concussion testing before a player can be approved for action.
SPORTS
June 26, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
The difficulty Hall of Famers such as Ted Williams and yes, Mike Schmidt, have had as managers is kind of understandable. What can they say? "Hey, kid, just go do what I did. " The latest Cooperstown plaque having less success coaching than playing is George Brett, the last guy to get close to Williams' mark of .400. Brett, though, always said hitting was easier for him to do than demonstrate. Now three weeks into a monthlong experiment as the Kansas City Royals' hitting coach, Brett is finding it slow going.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013
The End of World War II and the Birth of Baseball's Golden Age By Robert Weintraub Little, Brown. 445 pp. $27.99 Reviewed By John P. Rossi The 1946 baseball season was a remarkable one. The star players were back after World War II, 11 of the 16 major league teams set attendance records, and Jackie Robinson was playing for the Montreal Royals of the International League as baseball took its first step toward ending segregation of...
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