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Teddy Pendergrass

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NEWS
October 14, 2002 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
As Teddy Pendergrass sang "Turn Off the Lights" Saturday night, a woman stood almost directly in front of him about five feet offstage, swaying to his music. She looked as if she had been waiting 20 years for this moment, and, since Pendergrass' show at the Keswick Theater was his first hometown performance in that span, well, she had. Judging from the blissed-out expression she wore as she walked from the stage, the wait had been worth it. Backed by a crack group captained by noted keyboardist Bill Jolly and singing to a sparse but intent audience, Pendergrass showed little real dropoff from his earlier incarnation as lady-killer extraordinaire.
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, Reuters and USA Today.)
Teddy Pendergrass, 37, married his longtime girlfriend, Karen Still, Saturday, and they're honeymooning at an undisclosed site, the singer's spokeswoman revealed yesterday. About 50 guests attended the 20-minute ceremony at Pendergrass' Penn Valley home. Still, in her 30s, met the singer in 1977 when he launched a solo career, and she choreographed some of his performances. Until last year she danced with Philadanco. Through therapy, Pendergrass, who was partly paralyzed in a 1982 auto accident, has regained partial use of his arms and hands.
NEWS
February 28, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than five years have passed since Teddy Pendergrass' death. But his children and wife are still fighting over control of his legacy. The long-standing acrimony and legal battle over the singer's estate took another turn this week as his two daughters stepped in to challenge a will submitted by Pendergrass' second wife. Though Pendergrass left little money when he died, future returns are at stake. Since winning a court ruling in October, his widow, Joan, has started making plans for a movie, a musical theater performance, and a museum exhibit about her late husband.
NEWS
September 14, 1993 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
For a couple of decades, one of the coolest anecdotes in Philadelphia pop music lore had The Temptations dragging a teen-age Daryl Hall and his group, The Temptones, down to South Street to pick up magenta sharkskin suits at Krass Brothers. Born Daryl Franklin Hohl in Pottstown, the lanky towhead knew from witnessing numerous R&B shows at the Uptown Theater that any self-respecting vocal act was nothing without natty attire. Now Hall wants to set the record straight. "It was actually a purple mohair suit," Hall said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2015
TEDDY PENDERGRASS has been gone five long years, but his widow, Joan, still tears up when she talks about how the late soul singer died in her arms. "The past five years have been a bittersweet time," she told me yesterday. "A lot has gone on. " That's an understatement. A judge only recently settled a years-long, bitter dispute between Teddy's son and his wife over the soul singer's estate. Both presented wills, but it took until October for a Montgomery County judge to finally rule in Joan's favor.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JO-JO TYNES would go into a nightclub, toss back a Mistic fruit drink or just plain water and hit the dance floor. "He loved to have fun," said his fiancee, Kim Oliver. "Everybody loved him. He'd go into a club and people would say, 'Here's Jo-Jo!' He loved people. He loved to dance. " Joseph Tynes, known to everybody as Jo-Jo, worked with a number of musicians and musical groups as stage manager and general factotum, including Teddy Pendergrass, the O'Jays and the Three Degrees, traveling around the country and overseas.
NEWS
January 24, 2010 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Soul singer Teddy Pendergrass' funeral yesterday was the kind of soaring ceremony that punctuates the end of a larger-than-large life. A 200-member gospel choir jubilated with high-decibel exultation while a band and a sternum-vibrating organ roused the estimated 4,000 people who filled mammoth Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church on Cheltenham Avenue, the biggest African American church in Philadelphia. In turn, singers Melba Moore, Tyrese Gibson, Bunny Sigler, Gerald Austin, Lyfe Jennings, and Musiq performed songs by Pendergrass, a brawny, seductive baritone who leavened an incandescent sexuality with just enough sensitivity to stir arenas full of women and heat in any room where his music played.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is a place where dreams and stars were born - and a place where hearts and wallets were broken. And now the historic Uptown Theater, the siren in the 2200 block of North Broad Street, is working its wrenching magic again, this time on recording artist and producer Teddy Pendergrass. Yesterday, a small army of community entrepreneurs, city cultural officials, architects, structural engineers, activists and small business people toured the art deco theater to get a look at the spot where Little Stevie Wonder once performed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1995 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a cold January day, but a music practice room at the Community College of Philadelphia was charged with its own special heat as the 60-plus young members of the Teddy Pendergrass All Star Community Choir, and many more parents, friends and relatives, waited for the group's founder, benefactor and namesake to make his entrance. The room hummed in anticipation as director John B. Samuel led the students through their warm-ups. At last, almost an hour after this, the choir's first rehearsal, began, the moment had arrived.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teddy Pendergrass' son and namesake submitted a fraudulent will to try to gain control of the singer's estate, a Montgomery County Court judge has ruled. The decision from Judge Stanley Ott means the Pendergrass estate will remain under the control of his second wife, Joan, and will not shift to Theodore "Ted" Pendergrass II. At stake in the years-long dispute between son and widow has been not a large sum of money or property - Pendergrass had little of either before his death in January 2010 - but control over the singer's legacy.
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NEWS
February 28, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than five years have passed since Teddy Pendergrass' death. But his children and wife are still fighting over control of his legacy. The long-standing acrimony and legal battle over the singer's estate took another turn this week as his two daughters stepped in to challenge a will submitted by Pendergrass' second wife. Though Pendergrass left little money when he died, future returns are at stake. Since winning a court ruling in October, his widow, Joan, has started making plans for a movie, a musical theater performance, and a museum exhibit about her late husband.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teddy Pendergrass' widow hopes to make a movie about her husband's life, a musical theater performance about his ladies-only shows, and a product line in his name featuring cologne, perfume, and men's lingerie. Months after winning a contentious legal battle with the late singer's son over control of his legacy, Joan Pendergrass said she was busy making plans, which include republishing Teddy Pendergrass' autobiography and creating a traveling museum exhibit of his belongings. Tuesday marks the five-year anniversary of the singer's death after complications from treatment for colon cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2015
TEDDY PENDERGRASS has been gone five long years, but his widow, Joan, still tears up when she talks about how the late soul singer died in her arms. "The past five years have been a bittersweet time," she told me yesterday. "A lot has gone on. " That's an understatement. A judge only recently settled a years-long, bitter dispute between Teddy's son and his wife over the soul singer's estate. Both presented wills, but it took until October for a Montgomery County judge to finally rule in Joan's favor.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teddy Pendergrass' son and namesake submitted a fraudulent will to try to gain control of the singer's estate, a Montgomery County Court judge has ruled. The decision from Judge Stanley Ott means the Pendergrass estate will remain under the control of his second wife, Joan, and will not shift to Theodore "Ted" Pendergrass II. At stake in the years-long dispute between son and widow has been not a large sum of money or property - Pendergrass had little of either before his death in January 2010 - but control over the singer's legacy.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Pendergrass, widow of the famed musician Teddy Pendergrass, sat on the witness stand in Montgomery Court Court on Monday and wiped tears from the corners of her eyes. It wasn't so much the questions that Theodore "Ted" Pendergrass II's attorney was asking as he tried to poke holes in her story. It was the hearing's timing. "Do you know what today is?" she asked Timothy Holman, attorney for her late husband's son. Holman seemed to know. Pendergrass died on Jan. 13, 2010 - four years before, to the day. On Monday, Montgomery County Court Judge Stanley Ott continued the legal tussle over dueling wills that claim to give either the son or the widow control over Pendergrass' estate.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JO-JO TYNES would go into a nightclub, toss back a Mistic fruit drink or just plain water and hit the dance floor. "He loved to have fun," said his fiancee, Kim Oliver. "Everybody loved him. He'd go into a club and people would say, 'Here's Jo-Jo!' He loved people. He loved to dance. " Joseph Tynes, known to everybody as Jo-Jo, worked with a number of musicians and musical groups as stage manager and general factotum, including Teddy Pendergrass, the O'Jays and the Three Degrees, traveling around the country and overseas.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HERB WARD, a Philadelphia R&B singer of the '60s and '70s, had the unusual distinction of being more popular in England at one point in his career than at home. His hit "Honest to Goodness" did make a splash when it was played on WHAT-AM in Philly in 1969, but in England it sold more than half a million copies. Another song, "Strange Change," was released on the Philadelphia Buddy label in 1965, then had a second life when it was re-released in 1970 in England and became a huge hit. Herb was also featured in a recent film about soul music for British television called "The Strange World of Northern Soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2011
Who: Standout youngster on "Majors & Minors," an adorable, heart-swelling, no-elimination show featuring 12 amazing "minors," ages 10 and up, and their "major" celebrity mentors. Airs 7 p.m. Sundays on The Hub. Age: 14 From: Originally South Philly, now East Falls School: Meredith Elementary Memorable show moment: The first time he met Brandy, Michael performed a song he wrote - and reduced the R&B vet to happy tears. Back in town: Since the show wrapped, Michael's been a regular eighth-grader, taking the bus to school and singing in the adult and praise choirs at Greater St. Matthew Baptist Church.
NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Correction: An obituary Wednesday for singer and songwriter Nickolas Ashford, who died Monday at age 70, incorrectly described his song "Ain't No Mountain High Enough. " The song was a hit for Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell before Diana Ross recorded it. Nickolas Ashford, 70, the songwriter and singer who, with his wife, Valerie Simpson, penned hits such as "Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing" for Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell and "Let's Go Get Stoned" for Ray Charles while carrying on a successful career as an R&B duo, died of cancer Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2011 | By CHUCK DARROW, darrowc@phillynews.com 215-313-3134
WITH THE likes of Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber and Eminem scheduled to perform at last night's Grammy Awards wing-ding at Los Angeles' Staples Center, it's understandable that Mick Jagger's first live performance at the music industry's annual orgy of self-congratulation may not have meant much to younger fans. But for devotees of classic rhythm and blues, the scheduled turn by The Most Stoned Roller of Them All (as the late Daily News gossiptista Larry Fields would have written) and Raphael Saadiq was probably the show's highlight.
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