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Teen Drinking

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NEWS
September 30, 1986
On Sept. 20, I attended the Temple-Florida A&M football game and the Monkees concert. I have had season tickets for Temple footaball games for 10 years. I applaud Temple University for sponsoring a fun concert for our youth. But I also condemn Temple University and the City of Philadelphia for pouring beer down the throats of our youth. The teenagers of today must be very confused - the media tell them not to drink and drive or they die. Yet in the real world, adults sell them beer and do not even ask for identification.
NEWS
October 26, 1986 | By Andrew Maikovich, Special to The Inquirer
"There are people out there killing your children, and not only are you letting them do it, but helping them do it. " That was the message about teenage drinking that Arthur "Buzz" Shuman, La Salle University law professor and former Philadelphia prosecutor, gave to more than 400 parents, teachers and students at Haverford School Wednesday night. Shuman's talk was sponsored by the Student/Parent Education Committee, an organization founded to deal with student drinking and drug abuse.
NEWS
March 10, 2012
LANCASTER - A Lancaster County woman will spend six months in prison for the alcohol-related death of a teenager who passed out on her living room floor. Norma Edkin hosted at least 15 underage drinkers at her Mountville home at a June 2010 party that led to the death of Joseph Blankenmyer, 18, authorities said. Blankenmyer died of alcohol poisoning; his blood-alcohol level was between 0.357 and 0.438 percent the night he died, authorities said. Pennsylvania's legal threshold for intoxication is 0.8 percent.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | By David J. Hanson
'Underage drinking has reached epidemic proportions in America," warns Joseph Califano, head of the private Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA). His alarm is ominous, even frightening, as he calls for strong action in response to this national crisis. But relax. Underage drinking isn't increasing - it's actually dropping! Not only are fewer young people drinking today, but heavy drinking (so-called "binge drinking") continues to decline as well. Federal and other research repeatedly demonstrates this.
NEWS
September 30, 2002 | By Ralph Vigoda INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Early on the morning of April 29, 2001, 19-year-old Christopher Mowad - his blood alcohol at twice the legal limit for an adult - lost control of his SUV at 83 mph. It rolled over, killing him and two 18-year-old passengers. Judith Claire McCloskey, 43, had no contact with Mowad the night he died. She did not buy the beer he and his friends drank. She did not serve them. She did not go into her basement, where Mowad and dozens of other teens had gathered for a party hosted by her two daughters.
NEWS
June 16, 1986 | By Vanessa Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
The three young men, clad in T-shirts and shorts, cast furtive glances over their shoulders as one of them eased brown bottles of beer from a paper bag and passed them around. They then sat on the hood of a faded-blue pickup truck, swigging beer in open defiance of a local ordinance regulating public drinking. A week ago, 150 people were issued citations for violating the ordinance as this shore resort town - a popular vacation spot for graduates - began a crackdown on teenage revelers.
NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Left home alone, a Haddonfield teenager quickly organizes a weekend house party. As word spreads in the affluent suburb, dozens of youngsters descend upon the unchaperoned bash where beer and booze freely flow. It's an all-too-familiar scenario in Haddonfield, which has been forced to confront the staggering toll of underage drinking: two alcohol-related deaths in the last seven months; drunken teenagers rushed to the hospital in the last two weeks; and the arrest this year of two dozen for underage drinking, including 13 teens who trashed a Maple Avenue home during an unauthorized rowdy party, defecating on a piano and spraying urine all over the house.
NEWS
August 8, 2000
Letting your own teenager sip from a wine glass at the dinner table is a far cry from what went on in a Bucks County home on New Year's Eve. In the Plumstead home where Nicholas Karkas helped his teenage son stage an all-night beer and liquor bash, police reported there were cases of beer and bottles of vodka, rum and whiskey. One young guest told of having a dozen beers overnight, and he launched into New Year's Day with another few beers and vodka-spiked Jell-O. The guest, Thomas Nicoletti of Milford, N.J., left the party and, drunk, proceeded to slam his car into a tree - sending himself and a passenger to the hospital.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Teenagers convicted of drinking, possessing or transporting beer, wine or alcohol would lose their driver's licenses for at least 90 days if a bill approved overwhelmingly yesterday by the state House becomes law. The stiff penalty, which would apply even to those who are not caught drinking while driving or while riding in a car, now moves to the Senate. "We need something in Pennsylvania . . . to make kids consider they are going to lose something," said Rep. Kevin Blaum (D., Luzerne)
NEWS
October 19, 2002 | By Ralph Vigoda INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the click of handcuffs and a glance at her two teenage daughters in the second row, Judith McCloskey was escorted from a Northampton County courtroom to jail yesterday, minutes after being sentenced for her part in a tragedy that left three teens dead last year. McCloskey, 43, was convicted of involuntary manslaughter last month in a landmark case after three teens who had been drinking at her home died in a car crash. She was sentenced by Judge Stephen G. Baratta to 1 to 4 1/2 years in prison and fined $7,500.
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NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The underage drinking party was one complaint. Then there were parents out on the lawn, who said they could not contact their daughters, thought to be at the Saturday night party inside the East Goshen Township house. And then there were the hosts of the party, who allegedly stiffed the police who wanted to see what was happening in the house in the 1600 block of Bow Tree Drive. After finding what was inside - including several teenagers hiding in a basement crawl space - the Westtown-East Goshen Regional Police Department arrested Raymond Bonnett, 46, and his son Elliott, 18, and charged them with hosting a party at their East Goshen home for 19 underage drinkers on the Saturday night before St. Patrick's Day. The most-serious charges were not for hosting the party but two counts of "felony interference" with the custody of children.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Elizabeth Lopatto, Bloomberg News
Drunken driving among U.S. teens fell 54 percent in the last two decades, a trend helped by laws to curb underage alcohol consumption and higher gas prices keeping high school students off the road, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2011, 10 percent of high school students reported drinking and driving, compared with 22 percent in 1991, according to the report. People ages 16 to 20 are 17 times more likely to die in a crash when their blood alcohol is .08 percent, the legal limit in many states, the report in the Atlanta-based CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report found.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
A six-year campaign in Haddonfield to curb binge drinking among high school students by threatening to ban them from extracurricular activities could be at its end. New Jersey Education Commissioner Christopher Cerf is reviewing the affluent Camden County district's "24-7" policy after a state appellate court ruling last month struck down a similar policy at a North Jersey high school. The Haddonfield school board subsequently suspended its policy, which bars students charged with drug and alcohol offenses from representing the school publicly in activities such as athletics and school plays.
NEWS
March 10, 2012
LANCASTER - A Lancaster County woman will spend six months in prison for the alcohol-related death of a teenager who passed out on her living room floor. Norma Edkin hosted at least 15 underage drinkers at her Mountville home at a June 2010 party that led to the death of Joseph Blankenmyer, 18, authorities said. Blankenmyer died of alcohol poisoning; his blood-alcohol level was between 0.357 and 0.438 percent the night he died, authorities said. Pennsylvania's legal threshold for intoxication is 0.8 percent.
NEWS
April 24, 2008
The death of a 15-year-old Philadelphia girl who police say had spent hours knocking back cups of hard liquor with friends is yet another sad lesson on the dangers of binge drinking among teenagers. About 90 percent of the alcohol consumed by youths under the age of 21 in the United States is in the form of binge drinking, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fewer young people are drinking, but those who do drink do so at dangerously high levels.
NEWS
October 16, 2007 | By Michael Smerconish
There was a time I could walk into most of the bars in picturesque Lambertville, just over the bridge from New Hope, and greet people in the way immortalized on Cheers. I knew their faces and their names. After all, we were also together in homeroom, gym class, and geometry. They were my high school classmates, and we were able to avoid Pennsylvania's minimum drinking age (21) by driving just 10 miles to New Jersey, where the minimum was 18 - and even that sometimes seemed negotiable.
NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Left home alone, a Haddonfield teenager quickly organizes a weekend house party. As word spreads in the affluent suburb, dozens of youngsters descend upon the unchaperoned bash where beer and booze freely flow. It's an all-too-familiar scenario in Haddonfield, which has been forced to confront the staggering toll of underage drinking: two alcohol-related deaths in the last seven months; drunken teenagers rushed to the hospital in the last two weeks; and the arrest this year of two dozen for underage drinking, including 13 teens who trashed a Maple Avenue home during an unauthorized rowdy party, defecating on a piano and spraying urine all over the house.
NEWS
June 14, 2007 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The party is over. But the hangover from a sordid teen bash at a Haddonfield home and from posted Internet photos of other alcohol-drinking youths continued last night as town officials and parents looked for ways to head off future problems. Mayor Tish Colombi told a standing-room-only crowd of more than 300 residents at Haddonfield Middle School that the borough wants to discourage underage drinking and encourage better parental supervision. "We should be home with our families relaxing at the end of a busy day," said Colombi during last night's meeting, described as a community "Call to Action.
NEWS
May 28, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marc Schogol, who for three decades served as a master word craftsman and role model at The Inquirer, is gone. Mr. Schogol, who lived and worked with leukemia for 24 years, died at age 58 of the disease Sunday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. He and his wife, Elizabeth, lived in Drexel Hill, where they raised three children. "Marc was one of the pioneers in creating the new Philadelphia Inquirer in the 1970s," said Eugene L. Roberts Jr., executive editor from 1972 to 1990.
NEWS
December 9, 2003
IBELIEVE that the Philadelphia fails to fulfill its duty of prohibiting the sale of tobacco products and alcoholic beverages to minors. It is appalling that a great number of teens and preteens have easy access to such harmful substances. Over the years, I have seen advertisements against smoking, but there are still commercials promoting the consumption of alcohol. Nevertheless, it is easy for the adolescents of today to acquire tobacco products and alcoholic beverages. It disturbs me to see many of my fellow students smoking cigarettes after school or easily purchasing cigarettes at nearby stores adjacent to our school.
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