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Teflon

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NEWS
November 19, 1986 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Ronald Reagan meets the press on national television tonight, for what's being described as an attempt at "damage control. " The reference, of course, is to the damage Reagan's credibility is presumed to have suffered from disclosure that he gave "defensive" weapons to Iran as ransom for hostages held by Shiite gangsters in Lebanon. By all reasonable standards, it would be logical to presume such damage to the image of any president who pulled a caper like that after repeatedly vowing, "We will never negotiate with terrorists.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
When challenged, Gov. Christie sometimes yells like a Marine gunnery sergeant, calling reporters, citizens, and opponents alike stupid. Judging by his stratospheric poll ratings, voters love that shtick. He's "Jersey Strong. " And how often did former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell say something outrageous, such as opining in 2006 that many old people love casinos because they "lead very gray lives"? After a brief flare, the outrage faded, as it always did; it was just Ed being Ed. Last week, Gov. Corbett mentioned in a radio interview that he had heard some employers say they have trouble finding workers who can pass a drug test - and for that moment of candor, he caught three days of hell, both from Democrats running to replace him in 2014 and from media commentators.
NEWS
May 20, 2011
Joseph A. Dillon Sr., 74, of New Hope, who founded two Bucks County firms, died of lung cancer Sunday, May 15, at home. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Dillon dropped out of Roman Catholic High School to support his mother, served in the Army, and graduated from Benjamin Franklin High School in 1960. After several years of night classes, and while working as a laboratory technician at Rohm & Haas and Pennwalt Chemical Corp., he earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering at Drexel University in 1967.
NEWS
January 24, 1992
TAX TIME Top ten list of rejected income tax deductions (From Martin Adelstein, New York Times News Service) 10. Cosmetic surgery for pets (Zsa Zsa lost this round). 9. A famous drama critic tried to claim a deduction for blinders and ear plugs. 8. Several Hollywood starlets claimed deductions for Teflon wedding dresses. 7. A former first lady claimed a deduction for 3,000 shoe trees and 200 shoe horns (part of the official wardrobe, or something). 6. Howard Stern claimed he spent $20,000 on haircuts.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2000 | By Rosland Briggs-Gammon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When LNP Engineering Plastics Inc.'s products leave the loading docks, they look like colored rice. By the time they reach consumers, they've been transformed into larger plastic parts that hold the guts of computer printers, house cameras lenses, provide handles for gardening tools, or conceal the insides of cellular phones. LNP, which is based in Exton, embeds plastic compounds with fiberglass, Teflon or other materials to provide them with properties such as heat resistance.
NEWS
April 20, 1987 | BY LOU CANNON
Whatever else the Iran/Contra scandal may have done, it has put to rest the once-widespread belief that President Reagan was exempt from the laws of political gravity. The idea that Reagan escaped accountability for errors that could ruin lesser politicians arose in California, where he was elected governor in a landslide after demonstrating a total lack of knowledge about the workings of state government. In Washington, the notion of Reagan's invulnerability blossomed into the Teflon theory, so-called because nothing was supposed to stick to him. Teflon had a catchy ring and a Reaganesque quality of sounding significant while explaining nothing.
FOOD
February 25, 1987 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. I have a query regarding Hormel Brand Chili with no beans, which comes canned. I found pink rubbery tube-like particles throughout the meat. I enjoy the product, but please tell us what these curious-looking particles are. John Rudolph SHAPE, Belgium A. Dale Arett, supervisor of consumer response of the George A. Hormel Co. in Minnesota asked me to send him your name and address because the company would like to discuss this incident...
NEWS
June 22, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
John B. "Mick" McCafferty, 81, of Southwest Philadelphia, a retired DuPont Co. technician and singing bartender, died of cancer Thursday, June 17, at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby. Mr. McCafferty graduated from Southeast Catholic, now Neumann Goretti, High School in Philadelphia. He worked in construction, as a jeweler, and for a paint company before taking a position at DuPont's Marshal Lab in Grays Ferry in 1951. As a chemical technician, he helped create the coatings Teflon and SilverStone, and was involved in developing the coatings for Skylab spacecraft.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By Kelly P. Kissel, Associated Press
On the 100th anniversary of the birth of Dwight D. Eisenhower, some historians and political scientists are saying that he was a "Teflon president" before the term was coined. "Eisenhower got very little mud on his clothes and when he did, we cleaned it off for him. Even in a period of revisionism, we still like Ike intensely. Even John F. Kennedy didn't get this kind of treatment," said John Robert Greene of Cazenovia College near Syracuse, N.Y. "He is the middle class personified more than any other president of the post-war.
NEWS
October 7, 1987 | BY ROBERT C. MAYNARD
When our sons were much younger, one got into an awfully embarrassing altercation with another lad at a birthday party over a toy. The reason the story gets retold is that it added a ringing new phrase to the language of the family. Just as the two little disputants were about to come to blows, my wife swooped our little tiger right up off his feet. There he was, arms and legs flailing at thin air, shouting at the top of his lungs, "Lemme at that guy. Lemme at that guy. " Over the years, "Lemme at that guy" became the family metaphor for halfhearted combatants, people who claim they would fight a better battle or play a better game, "if only . . . " The excuse doesn't matter.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
May 8, 2013 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
'OUR FANS love the game and know we're trying hard every year to get better. Fans aren't stupid. They know when an organization is doing everything possible and when it's not. They probably wouldn't support us if we weren't working our butts off. " These are the words of 80-year-old Ed Snider to the Inquirer and Philly.com last week, spoken from the heart as always. Whether it's the fat deal he gave Chris Pronger or the one he gave Ilya Bryzgalov 2 summers ago, Ed always has backed that heart with his checkbook, and for that he escapes much of the vitriol that fans express toward ownership of our more recent champions, such as the current Phillies.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
When challenged, Gov. Christie sometimes yells like a Marine gunnery sergeant, calling reporters, citizens, and opponents alike stupid. Judging by his stratospheric poll ratings, voters love that shtick. He's "Jersey Strong. " And how often did former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell say something outrageous, such as opining in 2006 that many old people love casinos because they "lead very gray lives"? After a brief flare, the outrage faded, as it always did; it was just Ed being Ed. Last week, Gov. Corbett mentioned in a radio interview that he had heard some employers say they have trouble finding workers who can pass a drug test - and for that moment of candor, he caught three days of hell, both from Democrats running to replace him in 2014 and from media commentators.
NEWS
May 20, 2011
Joseph A. Dillon Sr., 74, of New Hope, who founded two Bucks County firms, died of lung cancer Sunday, May 15, at home. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Dillon dropped out of Roman Catholic High School to support his mother, served in the Army, and graduated from Benjamin Franklin High School in 1960. After several years of night classes, and while working as a laboratory technician at Rohm & Haas and Pennwalt Chemical Corp., he earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering at Drexel University in 1967.
NEWS
June 22, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
John B. "Mick" McCafferty, 81, of Southwest Philadelphia, a retired DuPont Co. technician and singing bartender, died of cancer Thursday, June 17, at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby. Mr. McCafferty graduated from Southeast Catholic, now Neumann Goretti, High School in Philadelphia. He worked in construction, as a jeweler, and for a paint company before taking a position at DuPont's Marshal Lab in Grays Ferry in 1951. As a chemical technician, he helped create the coatings Teflon and SilverStone, and was involved in developing the coatings for Skylab spacecraft.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2007 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
First of two parts Over its 205 years, DuPont Co. has manufactured some of America's best-known products - cellophane, nylon and Teflon. The breadth of its technological research, and the scientific talent that flocked to work at DuPont, has spawned more than 30 other firms - and many are in this region. "It is their variety that has spawned this variety," said Jonathan Russ, professor and historian of American business at the University of Delaware. "There have been firms historically where people have left to do their own projects - IBM, Xerox, Kodak.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2005 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The DuPont Co. said yesterday that it had agreed to pay $10.25 million in civil fines and to finance $6.25 million in research projects to settle allegations that it failed to report pollution and human contamination from perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA, a chemical used in Teflon and other products. The Environmental Protection Agency said the fine was the largest administrative civil fine ever obtained for violating the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. The previous record civil fine was $6.4 million against the Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co. in 1994.
NEWS
August 16, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After studying blood samples from 326 people, University of Pennsylvania researchers found no link between exposure to a chemical used to make Teflon and abnormalities that would indicate liver, thyroid or kidney disease. The study was to be presented last night to Ohio residents who live near a DuPont plant in Parkersburg, W.Va., which makes Teflon coatings. The effort is among the first large studies of everyday people who have been exposed to the chemical, perfluorooctanoic acid.
NEWS
December 17, 2004 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for DuPont Co. strongly denied at a federal hearing yesterday that the company had improperly withheld information about environmental and possible health impacts of a chemical used to make Teflon. The company did not notify federal regulators on several occasions when the chemical, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), was found in public water supplies near its factory in Parkersburg, W.Va., starting in 1984. But a change in reporting requirements by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, hammered out in several stages between 1991 and 1996, absolved industry from having to disclose any such information that came to light before 1992, DuPont's attorneys told administrative law judge Barbara A. Gunning.
NEWS
September 19, 2004 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 65 years ago in a South Jersey laboratory, a DuPont Co. chemist accidentally invented a waxy, white powder that would become one of the mainstays of the modern kitchen: Teflon. Today, this nonstick marvel is getting attention far beyond the stove-top. A chemical used to make it, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), has been turning up in people and animals worldwide: river otters in Oregon, polar bears in the Canadian Arctic, and in the blood of 96 percent of children tested in 23 states.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2004 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. vigorously denied federal allegations that it failed to submit information on health risks associated with a chemical used to make certain kinds of Teflon. In a 57-page response to the government late Wednesday, the company said that the chemical, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), posed no danger to humans at past or current levels and that, therefore, the information - from as early as 1981 - did not have to be reported. The Wilmington-based chemical-maker, the second-largest in the country after Dow Chemical Co., was responding to a complaint made last month by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
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