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NEWS
March 10, 1988 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Soviet Union acknowledged yesterday that it had supplied Iraq with short-range missiles, but said the weapons could not reach Iran's capital, Tehran, unless unauthorized modifications were carried out. Iran has charged that Iraq has been using Soviet-supplied ground-to-ground missiles in its latest barrage of Iranian population centers. But a senior Soviet official, in calling again for an end to the "war of the cities," said the Kremlin was not to blame for the new escalation in the 7 1/2-year-old war. "The efforts to present the whole affair as if the Soviet Union has anything to do with it are absolutely unfounded," said Vsevolod L. Oleandrov, head of the Foreign Ministry's Directorate for International Organizations.
NEWS
July 10, 1988
Before Iran Air Flight 655 was shot down, a debate was heating up over whether the United States should make new overtures to Tehran. This debate has actually intensified after the air tragedy, which has underlined the need to find a formula to end the Iran-Iraq war. Secretary of State George P. Shultz confirmed that before the accident, Iranian officials had sent messages through intermediaries that they were interested in a dialogue. Since these messages presumably reflect basic changes in Iran's geopolitical situation, it is likely that they will continue, despite the current ill feelings over the air tragedy.
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After nearly 20 years of hostility, small steps toward opening a dialogue between the people of Iran and the United States occurred this week at the University of Pennsylvania, as a professor from Tehran lectured on Iran's recent political changes. The visit of political scientist Moustafa Torkzahrani marked the first contact between American and Iranian academics since Iranian President Mohammad Khatami said in an appearance on U.S. television in January that he wanted to make a "crack in the wall of mistrust" between the two countries.
NEWS
June 9, 1989 | BY DONALD KAUL
I must confess I do not understand Iranians. I know that sounds racist, treating Iranians as though all of them are alike, but as nearly as I can tell, they are. At least when you get them together in a group, they act the same: as though somewhere deep inside their psyche, there is a screw loose. That has been my experience. I recall the actions of Iranian students in Washington shortly after their brethren in Tehran had taken our embassy staff hostage. They responded to our outrage by putting bags on their heads and staging a protest against our government, which had let the deposed shah of Iran into the country for treatment of his cancer.
NEWS
March 1, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Iraq fired a barrage of long-range missiles into Tehran today in attacks apparently aimed at ending the Persian Gulf war stalemate. The official Iraqi News Agency, monitored in Nicosia, said its gunners fired five surface-to-surface missiles into Tehran after two similar projectiles had exploded in Baghdad, killing and wounding "many civilians. " Iran's Islamic Republic News Agency IRNA, monitored earlier in Nicosia, said in urgent dispatches that "two loud explosions" were heard after nightfall yesterday in Tehran and "there may have been casualties and damage.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Adam Goldman and Matt Apuzzo, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Two years after a hostage video and photographs of retired FBI agent Robert Levinson raised the possibility that the American was being held by extremists, U.S. officials now see the government of Iran behind the images, intelligence officials told the Associated Press. Levinson, a private investigator, disappeared in 2007 on the Iranian island of Kish. The Iranian government has repeatedly denied knowing anything about his disappearance. Photos that Levinson's family received in late 2010 and early 2011 - showing his hair wild and gray, his beard unkempt - are being seen for the first time publicly after the family provided copies to the AP. In response to Iran's denials, and amid secret conversations with Tehran, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in a statement in 2011 that Levinson was being held somewhere in South Asia.
NEWS
August 22, 2007 | By Trudy Rubin
A vacation on the salt marshes of Cape Cod creates the delusion that all's right with the world. The neat patterns of nature on Blackfish Creek, where every plant and creature has its proper role, provide a calming sense of global order (especially after a trip to Baghdad). Cardinals whistle in the pines, the tall grasses disappear and return with the tides, an owl plaintively hoots each afternoon, and fiddler crabs send out bubbles from their sandy holes. However chaotic the planet (and the weather to the south)
NEWS
March 3, 2012 | By Anne Gearan, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama delivered his most explicit threat yet that the United States would attack Iran if that's what it takes to prevent the country from developing a nuclear bomb. At the same time, he warned Israelis they would only make a bad situation worse if they moved preemptively against Iranian nuclear facilities. The double-barreled warning, in an interview published Friday, came before Obama's high-stakes meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday and a speech Sunday to the American-Israel Public Affairs Committee, a powerful pro-Israeli lobby.
NEWS
May 11, 2003 | By John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leaders of an Iranian exile army that operated in Iraq for more than two decades surrendered to U.S. forces yesterday and agreed to place their troops and equipment in camps under coalition control. The well-armed People's Mujaheddin, with about 6,000 members, was the last organized armed force in Iraq and a potential challenge to the authority of the U.S.-led coalition. Members of the group had spent more than two decades fighting against Iran's Islamic government with support from Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | Associated Press
VIENNA - The U.N. nuclear agency chief will fly to Tehran over the weekend to sign a deal meant to allow his organization to resume a long-stalled search for evidence that Iran worked on developing nuclear arms, the agency and diplomats said Friday. The trip Sunday by International Atomic Energy Agency chief Yukiya Amano comes just four days ahead of a key meeting between six world powers and Iran where the six hope to wrest concessions from Tehran meant to reduce concerns that it wants such arms.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - News over the weekend that Iran had dismantled key components of its nuclear program and released five American prisoners emboldened some local supporters of President Obama's diplomatic efforts, though others urged caution and critics continued to question the international nuclear accord that led to those steps. The reactions came as the developments offered new context for a deal that has anguished many local officials, brought fierce resistance from some and stirred clashes in the early stages of Pennsylvania's U.S. Senate race.
NEWS
January 5, 2016
TEHRAN, Iran - Saudi Arabia announced yesterday it was severing diplomatic relations with Shiite powerhouse Iran amid escalating tensions over the Sunni kingdom's execution of a prominent Shiite cleric. The move came hours after protesters stormed and set fire to the Saudi Embassy in Tehran and followed harsh criticism by Iran's top leader of the Saudis' execution of Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr. Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir said Iranian diplomatic personnel had 48 hours to leave his country and all Saudi diplomatic personnel in Iran had been called home.
NEWS
September 12, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The Iran deal is a done deal. President Obama has enough Senate votes to ensure that it ultimately goes through. Sure, the deal has flaws and could have been tighter. But GOP candidates and legislators who have whipped up hysteria on Capitol Hill have never offered a plausible alternative. Nor have they been honest about the negative consequences if this deal were thwarted. (And of course they've never admitted that George W. Bush's Iraq war paved the way for Tehran's power surge in Iraq, Syria, and the Gulf.)
NEWS
July 25, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Israeli officials are orchestrating a campaign to have Congress scuttle the Iran nuclear deal by voting it down and overriding a promised presidential veto. Republican presidential hopefuls have jumped on the bandwagon, denouncing the deal as if it heralded the end of the world. There are indeed very serious concerns about the details, which the administration must try to allay. And Israel, whose right to exist is challenged by Iran, has every right to be concerned. But before Capitol Hill sinks into hysteria, legislators need to know that many former Israeli intelligence and national security officials oppose their government's approach - and think a congressional veto would be a disaster.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Here's one of the questions that worry both critics and supporters of the Iran deal: Will it encourage Tehran to make further mischief in the Middle East? Iran is the power behind Syria's war-criminal president, Bashar al-Assad, the armorer of Hezbollah, the trainer of Iraqi Shiite militias that fuel sectarian slaughter. And contrary to popular belief, Tehran's policies help ISIS. So it's legitimate to ask what impact the lifting of sanctions will have on Iran's machinations in the region.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
President Obama needs to do a much better job of explaining why the Iran nuclear deal makes good sense. The case can be made, barely, but the president didn't make it on Tuesday. For one thing, the administration has yet to clarify the still murky details about how Iran will be prevented from cheating. For another, Obama didn't allay the fears of Israel and Sunni Arab states that the deal signifies his acceptance of Iran's ambitions to dominate the region - efforts that are fueling ISIS's expansion.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
President Obama warned Iran's ayatollahs on Tuesday that he was ready to walk away from a nuclear deal if Tehran won't agree to tough measures to prevent cheating. Let's hope he means what he says. Negotiators have already extended the deadline from June 30 to July 7. The administration should push it back further if Tehran won't give inspectors adequate access or clear up questions about previous military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program. "Given past behavior on the part of Iran," said the president, verification can't "be a few inspectors wandering around every once in a while.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The June 30 deadline is fast approaching for a final agreement to limit Iran's nuclear program, and it's hard to see how the negotiators can meet it. That may not be a bad thing. The gaps are still wide between Tehran and the P5+1 (the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council plus Germany) on a deal by which Iran would restrict its nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of international sanctions. Most disturbing: Iran has yet to answer questions put by international inspectors about a suspected nuclear weapons program prior to 2003.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When it comes to nuclear negotiations with Iran, which are nearing a June 30 deadline, those who want a solid deal should be saying Vive la France! The French are taking the toughest stand of any of the six countries (known as the P5+1) that are negotiating with Tehran. Paris insists that any accord must permit continuing inspections of all Iranian nuclear installations, including military sites. This demand has been put forward by the entire P5+1 (the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council plus Germany)
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Tuesday was seemingly made for Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.). Two of the top priorities of his congressional career - U.S. relations with Iran and Cuba - were pushed to the forefront, each reaching a critical decision point. But after years of leading on both fronts, Menendez joined the debate Tuesday from a newly weakened position, having given up his seat as the top Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee as he faces federal corruption charges. "He's still there, but his wings are clipped," said Peter Feaver, who served in national security posts in the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations.
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