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NEWS
February 8, 2007 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Israeli-Palestinian conflict breaks hearts every day. So many dreams, so often dashed. In From Tel Aviv to Ramallah, opening tomorrow at the Painted Bride Art Center, beatbox artist Yuri Lane hip-hops through a one-man show scripted by his wife, religion scholar Rachel Havrelock, and set against a backdrop of multimedia projections by video artist Sharif Ezzat. Their goal: to depict the everyday hardships and aspirations of prototypical Arabs and Jews, "not just the headlines and images of violence" shown on TV, said Lane, speaking by telephone as he prepared to fly to Philadelphia from his home in Chicago.
NEWS
April 18, 2006 | By Dion Nissenbaum and Vita Bekker INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A Palestinian suicide bomber blew himself up outside a fast-food restaurant in a crowded shopping area of Tel Aviv yesterday, killing at least nine people and creating a fresh crisis for the new Palestinian government, led by the Islamic extremist group Hamas. Islamic Jihad claimed responsibility for the attack, the deadliest in Israel in two years, and released a videotape of the bomber making his farewell statement. Hamas leaders, who are already faced with a cutoff of aid to the Palestinian Authority, defended the bombing as a legitimate response to Israeli military operations, drawing immediate criticism from Israel and the United States, and the prospect of further political isolation.
NEWS
January 20, 2006 | By Dion Nissenbaum INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A young suicide bomber walked into a fast-food stall in a busy Tel Aviv market yesterday and blew himself up, injuring 30 people and raising tensions less than a week before Palestinians are to elect a new legislature. The attack was the first to hit Israel's biggest city in nearly a year, and it posed a new challenge for Israeli and Palestinian leaders. The bombing is the first to confront acting Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, who has been gradually asserting his authority since taking over for Ariel Sharon, who has been in a coma since he suffered a debilitating stroke two weeks ago. At the same time, the attack appeared to further undermine the standing of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, whose weakened Fatah party is facing a serious challenge from Hamas in next week's elections.
NEWS
March 2, 2005 | By Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
The United States accused Syria yesterday of playing a role in last week's deadly suicide bombing in Tel Aviv, Israel, as the Bush administration, backed by France, sought to increase pressure on Damascus on multiple fronts. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice made the assertion on the sidelines at an international conference in London to help the Palestinian leaders prepare for statehood. British Prime Minister Tony Blair, who convened the one-day session, said: "This is a moment of opportunity.
NEWS
February 26, 2005 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A suicide bomber shattered the informal truce between Israel and the Palestinians late last night, killing four other people and wounding dozens who were lined up at a karaoke club near a beachfront promenade. The familiar scene of shattered windows, pools of blood, and debris raised the specter of a resumption of violence that in 4 1/2 years has killed about 5,000 people. But unlike nearly all past suicide attacks, no Palestinian group claimed responsibility. Anonymous calls to several news agencies said two groups - Islamic Jihad and Al-Aqsa Martyrs' Brigade - had carried out the attack.
NEWS
October 30, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
After drifting from public view in his native Israel for several weeks, Golan Cipel - whose sexual harassment allegations led to Gov. McGreevey's resignation - was interviewed by FBI agents in Tel Aviv. The FBI has sought the interview since McGreevey's legal team lodged a complaint that Cipel and his attorneys were attempting to extort money from the governor in exchange for staying quiet about the allegations. McGreevey on Aug. 12 announced his resignation and proclaimed he was gay and had had an extramarital affair with a man. "We had been waiting for a while to speak with Mr. Cipel on this matter," FBI spokesman Steve Kodak said yesterday.
NEWS
October 3, 2004 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is 5:30 p.m. on the first Wednesday of the month. An impeccably dressed woman with evident purpose walks briskly toward the Warwick Hotel. Before she gets through the door, she is stopped three times, to hug one of the city's leading philanthropists, shake hands warmly with an envoy from Russia, and confer with a friend in need of advice. The woman is Nancy Gilboy, director of Philadelphia's International Visitors Council. When she finally gets inside the hotel lobby, Gilboy is enveloped by a stunning range of humanity.
SPORTS
May 4, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Philadelphia University announced yesterday that it will leave the New York Collegiate Athletic Conference and join the Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference in the fall of 2005. University president James P. Gallagher said all 11 sports that compete in NCAA Division II will play in the conference. The men's soccer team will stay in NCAA Division I, where the Rams compete in the Atlantic Soccer Conference. Gallagher said the CACC offers less travel. Several members, including Holy Family, the University of the Sciences, and Wilmington College and Goldey-Beacom in Delaware are close to the Rams' campus.
NEWS
December 26, 2003 | By Cliff Churgin INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Two attacks yesterday shattered two months of relative peace in the Middle East, as a Palestinian suicide bomber killed himself and four other people at a bus stop outside Tel Aviv just minutes after an Israeli helicopter killed a senior Islamic Jihad official and four other people in the Gaza Strip. The attacks could lead to a wave of retaliatory violence and damage new efforts to restart the Israel-Palestinian peace process. Palestinian officials and Egyptian mediators have been struggling to persuade Palestinian groups to halt attacks and to get Israel to forgo such targeted killings of militant leaders.
NEWS
April 30, 2003 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mahmoud Abbas was approved yesterday as the Palestinians' first prime minister and won swift approval of his cabinet. Supporters called the moves a turning point on a historic day in the search for peace. But hours later, a suicide bomber undermined those hopes when he killed himself and two other people and wounded 46 outside a Tel Aviv waterfront cafe near the U.S. Embassy. The explosion occurred about 1 a.m. today when a security guard stopped the bomber at the entrance of a pub called Mike's Place.
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