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Temple Law School

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NEWS
May 20, 1992 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Elden Samuel Magaw, 86, a professor at Temple Law School for 40 years and a staunch Democrat who tried several times - unsuccessfully - to bring two-party politics to Delaware County, died Friday in Norman, Okla. Dr. Magaw, who earned his law degree at the University of Oklahoma in 1931, was one of the first four law teachers hired at Temple Law School when it opened its day division in 1933 in the Public Ledger Building at Sixth and Chestnut Streets. He continued with the school as it moved to the 13th floor of Gimbels at Ninth and Chestnut Streets during World War II, to a remodeled synagogue on the Temple campus at Broad Street and Montgomery Avenue in 1953 and to its permanent new home in 1973.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2012 | Chris Mondics
When the legal markets imploded in 2008, and law firms started to ratchet back on hiring first-year associates and filling summer classes, it wasn't at all apparent that law schools, too, would need to tighten their belts. Some law-school administrators bravely claimed that while it was true there were fewer legal jobs, the potential uses of a law degree were so varied that graduates would find a way to land somewhere. There was, at the same time, the hope that the job-market troubles would be temporary, that the economy would revive and things would return to normal.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Susan Snyder and Steve Bohnel, STAFF WRITERS
Temple University's board of trustees on Tuesday took a unanimous vote of no confidence in president Neil D. Theobald during a private session, and announced its intention to dismiss him. The board's action, announced by spokesman Kevin Feeley, came after a regularly scheduled meeting. News of the planned ouster came less than a month after Theobald removed provost Hai-Lung Dai from his post and blamed him for a $22 million shortfall in the university's merit scholarship program.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
AFTER PLEADING NOT GUILTY, Myla Friedman, accused of murdering her former boyfriend in November, leaves a Common Pleas courtroom. Friedman, a Temple Law School student, yesterday appeared before Judge Charles Durham. She is free on $200,000 bail.
NEWS
October 3, 1986
In all fairness to Temple University students and the reading and viewing public, the "piddling episodes" that Carl E. Singley, dean of Temple Law School, refers to should be brought in full view of the public. We the public - rather than guessing and choosing sides on account of colors, a personal dissatisfaction by Temple President Peter J. Liacouras or Mr. Singley's involvement in the MOVE episode or even our own personal likes or dislikes - should know the facts as soon as possible.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan and Emily Babay, STAFF WRITERS
Peter Liacouras had a vision for Temple University. He wanted the commuter school on North Broad Street to become a world-class institution. He wanted star sports teams and leafy green quads and all the hallmarks of a classic American college experience. He wanted a diverse faculty and a student body that looked like the city Temple called home. And for nearly two decades as Temple president, he charged headfirst toward that vision - courting controversy along the way - as the university he dreamed of slowly became reality.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy, Staff Writer
Federal Judge Franklin S. Van Antwerpen, 74, of Easton, Pa., who oversaw many high-profile cases during his years on the bench - including the prosecution of mob boss Nicodemo "Little Nicky" Scarfo and 17 codefendants - died Monday, July 25, in Easton. In 1988, a year after President Ronald Reagan appointed him to a judgeship in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, he was assigned to preside over the Scarfo trial. All 18 defendants were convicted, and all received prison terms. Scarfo was found guilty of participating in eight murders, four attempted murders, 17 extortions, and two drug deals, as well as bookmaking and loan-sharking.
NEWS
October 25, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Raymond Drozdowski, 69, a state Superior Court judge in Camden County, died Tuesday of a cardiac arrest at his home in Cherry Hill. Judge Drozdowski, a graduate of Temple Law School, was a partner with the Westmont law firm Brown & Connery for almost 30 years before being named to the bench in 1989. He spent most of his last years as a practicing attorney defending Philip Morris Inc. As a judge, he was known for his unassuming and friendly manner, said Mimi Drozdowski, his wife of 44 years.
NEWS
November 26, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
This story was updated at 8:45 a.m. Retired Common Pleas Court Judge Anthony Defino was killed in a fire in his South Philadelphia home Sunday night, officials said Monday. The fire in the house on the 2500 block of South 20th Street around 7 p.m. and firefighters battled the blaze for about 45 minutes before bringing it under control. The cause of the fire is under investigation. No other injuries were reported. "It looked like mostly the back of the house was really engulfed in flames bad. The third floor, it looked like one of the bedrooms or the attic, they had the hardest time putting it out. It kept raising," said Mario Leonardo, who lives across the street from DeFino, 86, and his wife.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arneda J. Hazell, 84, who graduated from law school at age 40 and went on to guide one of Philadelphia's most prominent attorneys through the early part of his career, died Saturday of complications associated with Alzheimer's disease at Kearsney Nursing Home in Easton, Pa. Before becoming a resident of the nursing home about 11 years ago, Mrs. Hazell lived for many years in the Germantown section of the city. After graduating from Temple Law School in 1956, Mrs. Hazell opened a small office on Chestnut Street.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 22, 2016
ISSUE | JEWELERS ROW Mayor should preserve Philly's gem Mayor Kenney and his administration must save Jewelers Row - a city treasure - instead of Philadelphia losing jobs because of misplaced development ("Uncertainty on Jewelers Row," Aug. 13). This historic street and tourist attraction should not be destroyed bit by bit starting with a 16-story luxury condo tower. How many cities wish they had the oldest diamond district in America? There are parking lots ripe for development; why allow this Trojan Horse of a project to dull our gem?
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy, Staff Writer
Federal Judge Franklin S. Van Antwerpen, 74, of Easton, Pa., who oversaw many high-profile cases during his years on the bench - including the prosecution of mob boss Nicodemo "Little Nicky" Scarfo and 17 codefendants - died Monday, July 25, in Easton. In 1988, a year after President Ronald Reagan appointed him to a judgeship in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, he was assigned to preside over the Scarfo trial. All 18 defendants were convicted, and all received prison terms. Scarfo was found guilty of participating in eight murders, four attempted murders, 17 extortions, and two drug deals, as well as bookmaking and loan-sharking.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Susan Snyder and Steve Bohnel, STAFF WRITERS
Temple University's board of trustees on Tuesday took a unanimous vote of no confidence in president Neil D. Theobald during a private session, and announced its intention to dismiss him. The board's action, announced by spokesman Kevin Feeley, came after a regularly scheduled meeting. News of the planned ouster came less than a month after Theobald removed provost Hai-Lung Dai from his post and blamed him for a $22 million shortfall in the university's merit scholarship program.
NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University trustee Leonard Barrack and his wife, Lynne, have donated $5 million to the university to be used for law school scholarships, Temple announced Thursday. Both Barracks are Temple graduates. Leonard Barrack, a lawyer, graduated from the business school in 1965 and the law school in 1968, and his wife got her degree in education in 1968. Two of their children have also received Temple degrees. Terms of the five-year Barrack Scholars program are still in development.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan and Emily Babay, STAFF WRITERS
Peter Liacouras had a vision for Temple University. He wanted the commuter school on North Broad Street to become a world-class institution. He wanted star sports teams and leafy green quads and all the hallmarks of a classic American college experience. He wanted a diverse faculty and a student body that looked like the city Temple called home. And for nearly two decades as Temple president, he charged headfirst toward that vision - courting controversy along the way - as the university he dreamed of slowly became reality.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there They met in summer 2001, before the start of their senior year at Council Rock High School, when his friend was dating hers. Then school began, and another of Evin's friends asked Brett to be her date to the fall dance. Not understanding his mumbled answer, and, this being high school, she asked Evin to find out Brett's intent. "I'm going," he told Evin. "But just to hang out with you. " Despite that movie-worthy line, nothing happened at the dance. But Brett and Evin began talking more at school, and hanging out more together outside school.
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Ann Mellon Melchiorre, 79, of Ardmore, a mother, lawyer, and brokerage firm officer, died Thursday, July 16, of complications from dementia at Saunders House in Wynnewood. Born in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Lawrence J. and Kathryn Pizzagno Mellon. Ms. Melchiorre grew up in Colwyn and graduated from West Catholic High School. She went to work for the former Bell Telephone Co. of Pennsylvania, where she met Joseph Melchiorre. The two married and moved to Ardmore to raise a family.
NEWS
March 4, 2015 | Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sitting in a 12th floor office building overlooking City Hall, two of Nelson Diaz's staffers prepared him on how to pitch a room full of Millennials that evening. "We want you to get across that you were progressive before it was cool, outside of public office, without supportive legislators," said campaign manager Ian Rivera. "You did it when it was difficult and when you took heat for it. " Rivera and communications director Barry Caro, both in their late 20s, told Diaz, 68, to focus on his commitment to fixing Philadelphia schools, his rise from Harlem tenement to Temple Law School, and his record of civil rights activism - much of which occurred long before the voters he'd be addressing were born.
NEWS
January 18, 2015
ISSUE | FREE SPEECH Echoes of Penn Penn professor Anne Norton purports to protect speech but not bigotry, yet confuses both and protects neither ("Protect free speech, but don't defend bigotry," Jan. 14). Norton's model appears to be her employer, the University of Pennsylvania, which The Inquirer once branded as the nation's most politically correct university. That stemmed from a student's use of the term "water buffalo," for which Penn acted to expel him for violating its speech code.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawrence Watson, 76, of the city's Wynnefield section, a lawyer, died Tuesday, Aug. 26, of kidney failure at Presbyterian Hospital surrounded by family. Mr. Watson's interest in law, politics, and civil rights began early in his life. He participated in lunch-counter sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations in the 1950s and had occasions to speak with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., once while working the switchboard at his father's law practice. Mr. Watson was born in Philadelphia on Jan. 15, 1938, to Rufus and Arline Watson.
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