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NEWS
June 21, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The former director of a Montgomery County synagogue yesterday admitted systematically looting the temple's accounts for almost seven years to better his lifestyle and bail himself out of debt from a failed delicatessen. Barry Wilf, former executive director of Temple Sinai in Dresher, pleaded guilty to mail and bank fraud and tax evasion in a scheme prosecutors say cost the congregation $1.2 million between July 1993 and February 2000. Wilf's plea agreement means he likely will spend four to five years in prison, make restitution to Temple Sinai, and pay the government $168,000 in back taxes, interest and penalties.
NEWS
February 24, 1994 | By Lisa E. Anderson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"He who saves one life, it is as if he had saved an entire world. " - The Talmud An attempt to save a life has shown the members of Temple Sinai's adult Bat Mitzvah class the power of working together. The 14-woman class is leading a drive to find a bone-marrow donor for Jay Feinberg, 25, of West Orange, N.J., who was diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia in June 1991. On Sunday, the women will be at the synagogue taking blood samples from whoever is willing to provide them.
NEWS
December 6, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Joan Fairman Kanes
A Guinness World record was set Thursday at Temple Sinai in Dresher when 343 participants managed to keep 323 dreidels spinning simultaneously for 10 seconds. The contestants had been practicing for the big day.
NEWS
April 26, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / SUSAN KURTZMAN-PARDYS
CELEBRATING PASSOVER, Eric Busillo and his parents, Judy and John, partake of a special seder. The nursery school at Temple Sinai in Cinnaminson sponsored the dinner April 18 for its pupils. About 20 pupils attended.
NEWS
October 24, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a courtroom packed with members of the congregation he "betrayed and defiled," the former director of a Montgomery County synagogue was sentenced yesterday to almost five years in prison for stealing about $1.2 million from the temple's coffers. U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody told Barry Wilf, former director of Temple Sinai in Dresher, that the maximum 57-month, no-parole sentence was too light considering that "minor drug dealers get 60 months. " "The corruption and the magnitude of the corruption, day in and day out, and the petty corruption, day in and day out . . . ," Brody said, seeming exasperated by Wilf's admitted conduct.
NEWS
April 1, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rabbi Sidney Greenberg, 85, rabbi emeritus of Temple Sinai in Dresher and a writer and popular speaker, died of a stroke yesterday at his home in Manhattan. In 1942, the newly ordained rabbi became the spiritual leader for the fledgling congregation Temple Sinai, whose members were meeting in a former food market in West Oak Lane. "They had faith and enthusiasm," he later told a reporter when asked why he took the position. Four years later, the Conservative congregation moved to its own building in West Oak Lane and, in 1979, Temple Sinai followed its families to the suburbs and dedicated a new sanctuary in Dresher.
NEWS
October 2, 1998
My greatest disappointment is that we Catholics and Jews live side by side and still do not know each other well enough. We accept stereotypes of each other all too easily. My hope is that more gatherings like today's can be held, in which Catholics and Jews will frankly and fairly exchange views in mutual love and respect. Why is this so important? Because the forces of darkness are ever at work. New evils, new prejudices, new hatreds all too often are repackaged in new and more dangerous forms.
NEWS
September 22, 1996 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The rusty Star of David affixed to its roof is barely visible behind a high wall of shrubs. Drive past too quickly, and you'll miss it. But for decades, the small, stucco synagogue at 497 Hartford Rd. was home to Congregation Agudas Achim. It was part of a village called Springville, founded by about 25 Orthodox Jewish families who had fled both Czarist oppression in the 1880s and later, immigrant enclaves of Philadelphia. Springville later included a summer camp and weekend resort, and the synagogue was used by families vacationing there.
NEWS
December 2, 1999 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Men's Club at Temple Sinai in Dresher is thinking big as the century gets ready to turn. Big, as in Guinness Book of World Records. Tonight, as many as 400 people will crouch on the floor of the temple auditorium, each with a dreidel, the traditional toy of Hanukkah. And when the signal is called, they will touch their dreidels to the floor and start them spinning. If at least 278 of the toplike toys spin for more than 10 seconds, they will have beaten the world record for the most simultaneously spinning dreidels.
NEWS
January 2, 1996 | By John Murphy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Temple Sinai in Dresher will welcome new Senior Rabbi Howard Addison during his first service Jan. 12 at 8 p.m. Rabbi Addison, who will be the second senior rabbi in the history of Temple Sinai, succeeds Rabbi Sidney Greenberg, the founding rabbi of the congregation. Greenberg, who served for more than 50 years, is now a rabbi emeritus. Rabbi Addison come to Temple Sinai from Temple Beth Israel in Sunrise, Fla., where he was their rabbi for 10 years. At Temple Beth Israel, Rabbi Addison watched his congregation grow from 550 families to 750 families.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
In March, on the way home from a national conference about Israel, psychologist Bernie Albert talked to his wife about a suggestion made by one of the conference speakers: Host Sabbath dinners for fellow Jews - including strangers - who would then become hosts themselves. The exponential growth of hosts would mean that, Shabbat after Shabbat, more people within a community would come to know one another. Such a simple concept - such powerful ripples. "We should do something about that," Albert said to his wife.
NEWS
April 16, 2011
Betty Burger Blum, 87, of Huntingdon Valley, a business teacher, died of complications from heart surgery Thursday, April 14, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mrs. Blum left her native Germany with her family in the 1930s to escape the Nazis and settled in New York City. She earned a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in business education from Hunter College. In 1947, she married Henry Blum, who had also escaped Nazi Germany. They met at the beach at Jacob Riis Park in New York.
NEWS
July 30, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arnold H. Raphaelson, 80, of Dresher, professor emeritus of economics at Temple University, died of complications from lung cancer Thursday, July 22, at Abington Memorial Hospital. Dr. Raphaelson taught undergraduate and graduate students at Temple for 40 years until retiring in 2006. "Arnie loved teaching and put his heart and soul into it," said Richard E. Bernstein, an associate professor of economics at Temple. "He was witty and conscientious and was an old-school, chalk-and-talk guy. " Dr. Raphaelson served on Temple's Education Program and Policy Committee and on the Faculty Senate and its steering committee.
NEWS
April 22, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Morris Barufkin, 89, of Wyncote, a retired flooring company owner, died of a heart attack Saturday at home. Mr. Barufkin graduated from Olney High School. During World War II he served in the Army in the States and in France. After his discharge he was a sales representative for a flooring distributor in Philadelphia for five years before becoming a partner with B&P Flooring Distributors. In 1966, he sold his share of the business and established Morris Distributors in East Falls.
NEWS
April 16, 2006 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He held a steady, lucrative job and owned a $2 million home in Southern California. He produced three horror movies and was working on a fourth. He flew first class, drove a black BMW, and spent $74,000 on his daughter's bat mitzvah. He had a lovely wife, and not one, but three, paramours. For Denis Shusterman, an accountant from Fort Washington, life was good. It might have stayed that way, too, if his mother hadn't embezzled $1.3 million from her employer, Temple Sinai in Dresher.
NEWS
October 24, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a courtroom packed with members of the congregation he "betrayed and defiled," the former director of a Montgomery County synagogue was sentenced yesterday to almost five years in prison for stealing about $1.2 million from the temple's coffers. U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody told Barry Wilf, former director of Temple Sinai in Dresher, that the maximum 57-month, no-parole sentence was too light considering that "minor drug dealers get 60 months. " "The corruption and the magnitude of the corruption, day in and day out, and the petty corruption, day in and day out . . . ," Brody said, seeming exasperated by Wilf's admitted conduct.
NEWS
June 21, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The former director of a Montgomery County synagogue yesterday admitted systematically looting the temple's accounts for almost seven years to better his lifestyle and bail himself out of debt from a failed delicatessen. Barry Wilf, former executive director of Temple Sinai in Dresher, pleaded guilty to mail and bank fraud and tax evasion in a scheme prosecutors say cost the congregation $1.2 million between July 1993 and February 2000. Wilf's plea agreement means he likely will spend four to five years in prison, make restitution to Temple Sinai, and pay the government $168,000 in back taxes, interest and penalties.
NEWS
April 1, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rabbi Sidney Greenberg, 85, rabbi emeritus of Temple Sinai in Dresher and a writer and popular speaker, died of a stroke yesterday at his home in Manhattan. In 1942, the newly ordained rabbi became the spiritual leader for the fledgling congregation Temple Sinai, whose members were meeting in a former food market in West Oak Lane. "They had faith and enthusiasm," he later told a reporter when asked why he took the position. Four years later, the Conservative congregation moved to its own building in West Oak Lane and, in 1979, Temple Sinai followed its families to the suburbs and dedicated a new sanctuary in Dresher.
NEWS
December 8, 2002 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Vida Gaffin and her husband, Norman, were there from the beginning. When they moved to Cinnaminson in 1959, there were synagogues in Cherry Hill, Burlington, Willingboro and Merchantville. But there was no house of worship in their town. "There was nothing really accessible," Gaffin recalled. "And we had a viable Jewish community. " Gaffin said a group of about 100 neighbors and friends who were seeking a local spiritual base began the task of building Temple Sinai. Their dreams were realized in 1962 when the tan, stuccoed synagogue was completed on New Albany Road in Cinnaminson.
NEWS
December 27, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Temple Sinai will hold its first program at its newly opened Cantor's Cafe in Norristown at 8 p.m. Jan. 12. The evening will feature the synagogue's cantor, Stephen Freedman, who will present Hebrew, Israeli and Yiddish folk music. Freeman is an accomplished folksinger and composer who often performs his own arrangements as well as traditional songs. Light refreshments will be available. Tickets are $18 in advance and $20 at the door. Call 215-643-6510 for tickets or reservations.
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