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NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old Temple University student was shot in the neck near the North Broad Street campus early Sunday, and a suspect is in custody, police said. The student was shot about 3:30 a.m. in the 1900 block of North Gratz Street, Philadelphia police said. He was treated at Temple University Hospital and was expected to be released, university police said in a statement. Philadelphia police withheld the victim's name. A department spokeswoman could not provide the suspect's name or any charges.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Farid Abdelrahman graduated from Northeast High School in Philadelphia with a 3.88 GPA, a string of leadership and extracurricular experiences, and big aspirations: He wants to become a neurosurgeon and open hospitals all over the world. But his SAT score wasn't so good. Abdelrahman moved to the United States six years ago from Egypt, and still struggles with English, making the reading part challenging. "I was really upset," said Abdelrahman, 17. "I thought I couldn't go anywhere.
SPORTS
May 12, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The people began forming a line at 4 p.m., an hour before the church doors swung open, and some were still there as late as 10:15, 75 minutes after the scheduled ending. That thousands, despite rainy, dreary weather, turned out last night at St. Alphonsus Church, in Maple Glen, Montgomery County, to honor C. Robert "Bob" Harrington was an occurrence that should have surprised no one. He meant that much to that many. Harrington, 55, who first made a name for himself as a basketball player and coach, and then enhanced it by becoming a giant in labor relations as a vice president for personnel services and chief negotiator at Temple University, all the while nurturing old friendships and starting new ones and caring for his beloved family, died last Thursday after battling cancer for close to four years.
SPORTS
March 28, 2012 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Due to an unsettled offseason, the Big East Conference has finally released its 2012 football schedule. The conference had to deal with the departure of West Virginia before luring a former member that it had booted years earlier - Temple. For now, the Owls will have an 11-game schedule - including seven Big East foes - this coming season, with two bye weeks. That could change, as Temple is still looking to add a 12th opponent. So far, the Owls' schedule that was released on Tuesday is highlighted with games against Villanova, Penn State, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Cincinnati.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2015 | Jenny DeHuff, Daily News
Longtime KYW Newsradio newsman  Vince Hill , anchor of "KYW's Opening Bell," heard the closing bell yesterday when CBS Philly laid him off. "I had no idea it was going to be my last show," he told me in a phone interview. "I didn't want to go out this way. I don't take it personally, not at all. It may be all part of the [CBS] shakeup. " On July 1, CBS3 fired three of its top TV news personalities - Kathy Orr , Chris May and Beasley Reece . Since his wife, Janis, died in 2011 following surgery to remove two brain tumors, Hill has lived with his two sons in Woolwich Township, Gloucester County, N.J. He said he learned of his firing not long after his midday broadcast yesterday and was six years away from retirement.
SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY has asked a Canadian high school to stop using an owl mascot that looks very much like its own. Temple officials said Thursday that the school in Kelowna, British Columbia, has agreed to change its symbol. The Kelowna Daily Courier reported that the local high school's scowling bird was virtually identical to Temple's Hooter the Owl. Kelowna Secondary School began using the symbol in 2002, after Temple had trademarked its image. It's not clear how the mascots ended up looking alike.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has tapped current provost and long-time administrator Richard M. Englert to serve as acting president while the search for a permanent successor continues. Englert, also senior vice president for academic affairs, becomes acting president on July 1 upon the exit of current president Ann Weaver Hart, Temple Board President Patrick O'Connor said Wednesday morning. The university is in the middle of a national search to replace Hart, who has served as president for six years and will become president of the University of Arizona.
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DELORES M. Andy had two heroines. There was Goldie E. Watson, a legendary Philadelphia civil rights leader who ran the Model Cities Program and told Congress where to get off when it found her in contempt for not answering questions about Communism in the McCarthy-era Red scare. The other was Ida B. Wells, journalist, crusader for justice and women's rights firebrand of the 1920s. Goldie Watson, who died in 1994, had a direct influence on Delores Andy, leading her into civil rights causes, including the march to integrate Girard College in 1965.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University's board of trustees on Tuesday approved a 2.8 percent increase in tuition for the coming year, meaning in-state students will pay $14,398 in 2015-16, up by $392 from the last academic year. Fees for all full-time students will rise by $100, to $790, to accommodate increased costs in activities and technology, said Ken Kaiser, Temple's chief financial officer and treasurer. Students will pay $15,188 in 2015-16 for tuition and fees, up $492 (3.3 percent) from the last academic year.
LIVING
March 6, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Classical music for babies. Foreign language tapes for toddlers. Today's parents are trying all sorts of things to stimulate their children in the hopes of maximizing brain power in the critical period right after birth. But do experiences in the early years - listening to Mozart or not - really determine how a child fares in the long run? In his 1999 book, The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning, child-education expert John Bruer debunks the popular notion that the most important period of brain development occurs before the age of 3. Bruer, who heads the James S. McDonnell Foundation in St. Louis, will join a panel of Philadelphia experts to discuss the "zero-to-three" theory at a symposium next Monday from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Temple University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Bill Cosby and his supporters went on the offensive Tuesday, launching a multipronged defense in response to a barrage of negative publicity following last weekend's release of his testimony in a 2005 sexual-assault lawsuit. In federal court in Philadelphia, Cosby's legal team asked a judge to sanction Andrea Constand, a former Temple University employee and the accuser in the case, saying she and her lawyers failed to prevent a court reporting service from sharing the actor-comedian's deposition.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard K. Bohlen, 74, a salesman who was mayor of Lumberton Township in the 1980s, died of heart failure Saturday, July 18, at his home there. Mr. Bohlen also was a Lumberton Township Committee member from the late 1970s through the mid-1980s, his son, Scott, said. Mr. Bohlen grew up in Villanova and earned a bachelor's degree in business at Temple University. He served as a Navy medic. "When he started out," his son said, "he owned a cheese shop in Haddonfield in the mid- to late 1960s," his son said.
NEWS
July 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The head of the Temple University faculty union said that board of trustees chairman Patrick O'Connor's representation of comedian Bill Cosby in a sexual-assault lawsuit posed a conflict of interest and that O'Connor should "seriously consider" stepping down. Art Hochner, president of the Temple Association of University Professionals, said Monday that O'Connor should have either stepped down from the Temple board before representing Cosby in 2005, or asked Cosby to find another lawyer.
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DELORES M. Andy had two heroines. There was Goldie E. Watson, a legendary Philadelphia civil rights leader who ran the Model Cities Program and told Congress where to get off when it found her in contempt for not answering questions about Communism in the McCarthy-era Red scare. The other was Ida B. Wells, journalist, crusader for justice and women's rights firebrand of the 1920s. Goldie Watson, who died in 1994, had a direct influence on Delores Andy, leading her into civil rights causes, including the march to integrate Girard College in 1965.
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
The lawyer who represented Bill Cosby in a 2005 sexual assault lawsuit filed by a former Temple University employee said Sunday his client had been treated unfairly by the release of new excerpts from a deposition Cosby gave in the case. Published Saturday by the New York Times, the excerpts included sworn testimony in which Cosby discussed his serial philandering, his use of his celebrity to bed starstruck young women, and his use of drugs in sexual encounters. But, lawyer Patrick O'Connor said in his first public statements since the transcript's release, that's only one side of the story.
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuition for incoming freshmen and sophomores at Pennsylvania State University's main campus would rise 2.7 percent, or $450, for 2015-16 under a proposal passed by the board of trustees' finance committee Thursday. In-state students would pay $17,022, up from $16,572 last year, the university said. Out-of-state students also would pay more. In March, the trustees approved a 3.89 percent increase in room-and-board costs. If the tuition proposal is adopted this week, the total per-student cost, including fees, would exceed $28,100 for next year.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
Near the end of President Obama's speech Tuesday before the NAACP convention, Jeffrey Copeland heard the president tell the thousands at the Convention Center how the Francisville man had been arrested six times before his 35th birthday. Copeland, a 39-year-old full-time criminology student at Temple University, was stunned. "I didn't know that he was going to put it out like that," Copeland said Tuesday night. "I got a little choked up. It's one thing to hear yourself say it. It's one thing to say it to another person.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University's board of trustees on Tuesday approved a 2.8 percent increase in tuition for the coming year, meaning in-state students will pay $14,398 in 2015-16, up by $392 from the last academic year. Fees for all full-time students will rise by $100, to $790, to accommodate increased costs in activities and technology, said Ken Kaiser, Temple's chief financial officer and treasurer. Students will pay $15,188 in 2015-16 for tuition and fees, up $492 (3.3 percent) from the last academic year.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two more of Bill Cosby's accusers have joined in asking a federal judge in Philadelphia to release the full transcript of the actor-comedian's testimony in a 2005 assault and defamation civil case. In a motion filed Monday, Beth Ferrier and Rebecca Neal - both of whom have accused Cosby of sexually assaulting them in the 1980s - joined an earlier request to release his deposition in a case brought by Andrea Constand, a former Temple University employee who alleged that Cosby drugged and molested her. U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno unsealed excerpts from the deposition last week, among other legal documents in the case.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2015 | Jenny DeHuff, Daily News
Longtime KYW Newsradio newsman  Vince Hill , anchor of "KYW's Opening Bell," heard the closing bell yesterday when CBS Philly laid him off. "I had no idea it was going to be my last show," he told me in a phone interview. "I didn't want to go out this way. I don't take it personally, not at all. It may be all part of the [CBS] shakeup. " On July 1, CBS3 fired three of its top TV news personalities - Kathy Orr , Chris May and Beasley Reece . Since his wife, Janis, died in 2011 following surgery to remove two brain tumors, Hill has lived with his two sons in Woolwich Township, Gloucester County, N.J. He said he learned of his firing not long after his midday broadcast yesterday and was six years away from retirement.
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