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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE WAY David M. Jacobs sees it, aliens from outer space have been kidnapping humans for aeons and sexually molesting them to create human-alien hybrids that walk among us today undetected and will soon take over Earth. He knows that sounds crazy. But he long ago quit caring what people think of him. As director of the International Center for Abduction Research, Jacobs, 71, has made it his life's mission to investigate claims of extraterrestrial abduction. "What I'm doing will either be an interesting but nonessential footnote to popular culture or the most important thing that's ever happened to humankind.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old Temple University student was shot in the neck near the North Broad Street campus early Sunday, and a suspect is in custody, police said. The student was shot about 3:30 a.m. in the 1900 block of North Gratz Street, Philadelphia police said. He was treated at Temple University Hospital and was expected to be released, university police said in a statement. Philadelphia police withheld the victim's name. A department spokeswoman could not provide the suspect's name or any charges.
SPORTS
May 12, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The people began forming a line at 4 p.m., an hour before the church doors swung open, and some were still there as late as 10:15, 75 minutes after the scheduled ending. That thousands, despite rainy, dreary weather, turned out last night at St. Alphonsus Church, in Maple Glen, Montgomery County, to honor C. Robert "Bob" Harrington was an occurrence that should have surprised no one. He meant that much to that many. Harrington, 55, who first made a name for himself as a basketball player and coach, and then enhanced it by becoming a giant in labor relations as a vice president for personnel services and chief negotiator at Temple University, all the while nurturing old friendships and starting new ones and caring for his beloved family, died last Thursday after battling cancer for close to four years.
SPORTS
March 28, 2012 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Due to an unsettled offseason, the Big East Conference has finally released its 2012 football schedule. The conference had to deal with the departure of West Virginia before luring a former member that it had booted years earlier - Temple. For now, the Owls will have an 11-game schedule - including seven Big East foes - this coming season, with two bye weeks. That could change, as Temple is still looking to add a 12th opponent. So far, the Owls' schedule that was released on Tuesday is highlighted with games against Villanova, Penn State, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Cincinnati.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, For The Inquirer
Some of the autistic children Connor Kerns works with have odd fears: exposed pipes, bubbles on pizza, a microwave's beep. These may seem innocuous to many people, but for someone with autism, they can trigger a wave of worry and anxiety. About 40 percent to 60 percent of people with autism have a diagnosable anxiety disorder or an atypical anxiety driven by irregular fears or unusual social anxiety, said Kerns, assistant professor at the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute. Anxiety is a common concern for the parents of autistic children and adults on the spectrum.
SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY has asked a Canadian high school to stop using an owl mascot that looks very much like its own. Temple officials said Thursday that the school in Kelowna, British Columbia, has agreed to change its symbol. The Kelowna Daily Courier reported that the local high school's scowling bird was virtually identical to Temple's Hooter the Owl. Kelowna Secondary School began using the symbol in 2002, after Temple had trademarked its image. It's not clear how the mascots ended up looking alike.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has tapped current provost and long-time administrator Richard M. Englert to serve as acting president while the search for a permanent successor continues. Englert, also senior vice president for academic affairs, becomes acting president on July 1 upon the exit of current president Ann Weaver Hart, Temple Board President Patrick O'Connor said Wednesday morning. The university is in the middle of a national search to replace Hart, who has served as president for six years and will become president of the University of Arizona.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University has unveiled plans for a sleek, new $190 million library that will span a city block and serve as an anchor in the heart of the North Philadelphia campus. The 210,000-square-foot library - which will rise at the current site of Barton Hall, between Liacouras Walk and 13th Street - will replace Paley Library, which will be retooled as a welcome center, with a cafe, classrooms, and gathering spaces. A rendering by the architectural firm Snøhetta shows a futuristic expanse with a sweeping front arch, a green roof, and an outdoor balcony offering cross-campus views.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
LAWYERS MIGHT HAVE one of the most joked-about jobs on Earth, but here in Philadelphia, they now are among the most celebrated: Temple University yesterday officially opened a national Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame. The hall was founded in 2009 by the Trial Lawyer magazine, but hasn't had a physical home until now. Its goal: to honor trial lawyers "who have left an indelible mark on the American legal tradition through a lifetime of service to the American public, the Constitution and the American trial bar," according to its website.
LIVING
March 6, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Classical music for babies. Foreign language tapes for toddlers. Today's parents are trying all sorts of things to stimulate their children in the hopes of maximizing brain power in the critical period right after birth. But do experiences in the early years - listening to Mozart or not - really determine how a child fares in the long run? In his 1999 book, The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning, child-education expert John Bruer debunks the popular notion that the most important period of brain development occurs before the age of 3. Bruer, who heads the James S. McDonnell Foundation in St. Louis, will join a panel of Philadelphia experts to discuss the "zero-to-three" theory at a symposium next Monday from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Temple University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sitting around a Temple University conference table, Ameena Soliman and her classmates laid out the problem: Commuter students have no place to store books or keep warm while they wait for a train. "If you have four classes and four textbooks, you have to carry them all day," noted Soliman, a finance and marketing major from Yardley who was a freshman in the fall of 2013 when she lodged her complaint. The professors - Neil D. Theobald and his wife, Sheona - listened intently.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
An 18-year-old Temple University student who may have been taking pictures from an eighth-floor Center City dorm room Thursday evening fell to her death and struck and injured a pedestrian on the sidewalk below, police said. Shortly before 6 p.m., police responded to numerous 911 calls reporting that one or two people may have fallen from a building in the 100 block of South 16th Street, said Chief Inspector Scott Small. They found two women lying next to each other on the sidewalk outside the H&M store at the high-traffic corner of 16th and Chestnut Streets, Small said.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kareem Ali is ahead of the curve. Ali is a senior at Timber Creek High School - for another six days, anyway. Ali will graduate from Timber Creek on Friday and enroll at Temple University on a football scholarship on Jan. 20. "It's exciting," said Ali, a first-team all-South Jersey defensive back. "This is something I wanted to do, get an early start. " Ali took extra courses over the summer to be able to graduate early. He wanted to get a jump on his college education and also on his college football career.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia has named its next artistic director and principal director: Paul Rardin, only the 13th leader in the choir's 141-year history. Rardin, 49, will keep the job as director of choral activities at Temple University he began in 2011, and starts his initial two-year Mendelssohn contract July 1. Except for a 45-minute rehearsal as part of the interview process, Rardin has never before conducted the 130-voice Mendelssohn choir - his first outing won't be until fall - but says that having grown up in the area (Germantown and East Mount Airy)
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Rachel Zamzow, For The Inquirer
Some of the autistic children Connor Kerns works with have odd fears: exposed pipes, bubbles on pizza, a microwave's beep. These may seem innocuous to many people, but for someone with autism, they can trigger a wave of worry and anxiety. About 40 percent to 60 percent of people with autism have a diagnosable anxiety disorder or an atypical anxiety driven by irregular fears or unusual social anxiety, said Kerns, assistant professor at the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute. Anxiety is a common concern for the parents of autistic children and adults on the spectrum.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writerrussv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
TERESA SCOTT SOUFAS, dean of Temple University's College of Liberal Arts, resigned effective immediately yesterday for health reasons, according to Temple Provost Hai-Lung Dai. Following a sabbatical, Soufas will return to teach, complete a book on Spanish literature and work to launch a research center for global studies, Dai wrote in an email sent to the CLA faculty and staff yesterday. Dai wrote that Soufas, who had led one of the largest of the schools and colleges at Temple since July 2007, "has made it a priority to support an environment of cross-disciplinary collaboration.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Constance K. Dean, 94, of Gladwyne, a journalist who later became a publicist, died Tuesday, Dec. 30, of influenza at Lankenau Hospital. An Overbrook native, Mrs. Dean graduated from Overbrook High School in 1938 and earned a bachelor of science degree in commerce from Temple University's School of Communications in 1942. Mrs. Dean began her career by working for International News Service, founded by publisher William Randolph Hearst. She was based in Philadelphia, from which her news and feature stories went out on the wire and appeared in newspapers, journals and periodicals.
NEWS
December 30, 2014
ISSUE | LIBRARIES Shelving print Temple University's announcement of plans for a new library is no cause for celebration ("Temple's new library must go digital," Dec. 12). A major research university requires a large circulating print collection that is browsable and open. Computerized databases cannot replace the discovery process of exploring the stacks, nor have they been proven to have the same value and life span as a traditional bound book. It is a disservice to Temple's students and scholars to sacrifice such a necessity to make room for flavor-of-the-month gadgetry.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The head of Temple University's theater department and his wife, a theater professor at Villanova University, were seriously injured Christmas Day when they were struck by a police officer's motorcycle in Puerto Rico. Robert Hedley, 78, and Harriet Power, 64, of Bala Cynwyd, suffered fractures and head injuries and were in stable condition at Centro Medico de Rio Piedras in San Juan. Puerto Rican authorities said the two were accidentally run over in San Juan by a police officer assigned to protect the U.S. territory's governor.
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