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Temple University

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NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old Temple University student was shot in the neck near the North Broad Street campus early Sunday, and a suspect is in custody, police said. The student was shot about 3:30 a.m. in the 1900 block of North Gratz Street, Philadelphia police said. He was treated at Temple University Hospital and was expected to be released, university police said in a statement. Philadelphia police withheld the victim's name. A department spokeswoman could not provide the suspect's name or any charges.
SPORTS
May 12, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The people began forming a line at 4 p.m., an hour before the church doors swung open, and some were still there as late as 10:15, 75 minutes after the scheduled ending. That thousands, despite rainy, dreary weather, turned out last night at St. Alphonsus Church, in Maple Glen, Montgomery County, to honor C. Robert "Bob" Harrington was an occurrence that should have surprised no one. He meant that much to that many. Harrington, 55, who first made a name for himself as a basketball player and coach, and then enhanced it by becoming a giant in labor relations as a vice president for personnel services and chief negotiator at Temple University, all the while nurturing old friendships and starting new ones and caring for his beloved family, died last Thursday after battling cancer for close to four years.
SPORTS
March 28, 2012 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Due to an unsettled offseason, the Big East Conference has finally released its 2012 football schedule. The conference had to deal with the departure of West Virginia before luring a former member that it had booted years earlier - Temple. For now, the Owls will have an 11-game schedule - including seven Big East foes - this coming season, with two bye weeks. That could change, as Temple is still looking to add a 12th opponent. So far, the Owls' schedule that was released on Tuesday is highlighted with games against Villanova, Penn State, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Cincinnati.
SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY has asked a Canadian high school to stop using an owl mascot that looks very much like its own. Temple officials said Thursday that the school in Kelowna, British Columbia, has agreed to change its symbol. The Kelowna Daily Courier reported that the local high school's scowling bird was virtually identical to Temple's Hooter the Owl. Kelowna Secondary School began using the symbol in 2002, after Temple had trademarked its image. It's not clear how the mascots ended up looking alike.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has tapped current provost and long-time administrator Richard M. Englert to serve as acting president while the search for a permanent successor continues. Englert, also senior vice president for academic affairs, becomes acting president on July 1 upon the exit of current president Ann Weaver Hart, Temple Board President Patrick O'Connor said Wednesday morning. The university is in the middle of a national search to replace Hart, who has served as president for six years and will become president of the University of Arizona.
LIVING
March 6, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Classical music for babies. Foreign language tapes for toddlers. Today's parents are trying all sorts of things to stimulate their children in the hopes of maximizing brain power in the critical period right after birth. But do experiences in the early years - listening to Mozart or not - really determine how a child fares in the long run? In his 1999 book, The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning, child-education expert John Bruer debunks the popular notion that the most important period of brain development occurs before the age of 3. Bruer, who heads the James S. McDonnell Foundation in St. Louis, will join a panel of Philadelphia experts to discuss the "zero-to-three" theory at a symposium next Monday from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Temple University.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
LAWYERS MIGHT HAVE one of the most joked-about jobs on Earth, but here in Philadelphia, they now are among the most celebrated: Temple University yesterday officially opened a national Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame. The hall was founded in 2009 by the Trial Lawyer magazine, but hasn't had a physical home until now. Its goal: to honor trial lawyers "who have left an indelible mark on the American legal tradition through a lifetime of service to the American public, the Constitution and the American trial bar," according to its website.
NEWS
March 4, 2008
Working with Temple University officials, Philadelphia police took decisive action by charging four Temple students with the senseless beating of the grandson of a Holocaust survivor. The attackers reportedly shouted anti-Semitic slurs before pummeling the 23-year-old college student, a visitor to the North Broad Street campus who attends Penn State University. While the victim suffered a broken nose and orbital bone in his face, the hopeful news is that he is expected to recover fully, his father told a campus meeting on the attack late last week.
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University's incoming president will take office Monday, but will postpone laying out his agenda in an inauguration speech until October. Neil D. Theobald, whose inauguration had been scheduled for April, said he wanted more time to learn about the 39,000-student university before formulating a solid plan for the future. "The goal is to listen - what should our priorities be? - and discuss them," said Theobald, 56, who has just finished his tenure as senior vice president and chief financial officer at Indiana University.
NEWS
April 4, 2004
Temple University was in the news recently in a way it couldn't have liked. More than 100 angry students demonstrated in Center City last Sunday - tangling traffic as they marched toward the Rittenhouse Square residence of Temple President David Adamany. These were African American and Latino students. The essence of their complaint: As Temple has gotten bigger, recruiting students from the suburbs and out of state, the campus has become increasingly white. The protesting students blame Adamany for falling back on minority recruitment.
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NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oscar Solomon Bortner, 94, a former Bucks County prosecutor and Common Pleas Court judge, died of natural causes Wednesday, June 24, in his Langhorne home. Mr. Bortner grew up in Philadelphia, where he completed his undergraduate studies at Temple University. After enlisting in the Army in 1943 as a weaponry technician, he completed a law degree at University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1949. His daughter Amy Gialuco remembers her father's time as an amateur actor when she was young.
SPORTS
June 25, 2015 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
HARVEY POLLACK was all about the numbers. And no one was better at recording them than he. Given the nickname "Super Stat" in 1966 by then- Bulletin sports writer George Kiseda, Pollack introduced terms including triple-double, blocked shots, assists and steals into the everyday basketball vernacular. But the numbers stopped yesterday, as Pollack passed away at the age of 93. Pollack was involved in a one-car accident on New Year's Day, after serving as a judge for the Mummers Parade, suffering numerous injuries.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council is likely to vote Thursday on a proposal to add rules and regulations to the appetizing, yet increasingly crowded, chaos of the food vending trucks and carts that serve Temple University's campus. A bill sponsored by Council President Darrell L. Clarke at Temple's request would create a "vending district" for the popular trucks and carts. Its passage is seen as likely. The proposed district would extend from Diamond Street south to Oxford Street, and 10th Street west to 16th Street - boundaries much like the area on and around the North Philadelphia campus that the trucks now occupy.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Margery Cohen Willis, 72, of Chestnut Hill, a businesswoman and educator, died of cancer Thursday, June 11, at home. Mrs. Willis grew up in Wynnefield and attended Overbrook High School - to which she would return to almost 50 years later as an English teacher. After earning an undergraduate degree in education from Temple University, Mrs. Willis taught at Simon Gratz High School before returning to Temple to earn a master's degree in communications. She worked toward a Ph.D.
SPORTS
June 11, 2015 | By Laine Higgins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just over three months have passed since Blanca Fernandez, 23, broke her first school record for the women's track program at Temple University. Since she finished the 3,000-meter race at the Valentine Invitational in 9 minutes and 16.24 seconds on Feb. 13, Fernandez has gone on to cement her place in Owls running history, becoming the first female athlete in almost three decades to represent Temple at the 2015 NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships...
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doris Polsky, a precocious mathematician who helped integrate Mt. Airy, died in her home Wednesday at Cresheimbrook Condominium. She was 90. Along with her twin sister, she was recruited out of the Philadelphia High School for Girls to work on U.S. Army research ballistics during World War II. Together, they also helped found the Allens Lane Art Center and West Mt. Airy Neighbors. As owners of Twin Realty they helped staunch white flight in Northwest Philadelphia during the 1960s, and thwarted banks' redlining practices and selling to people of all colors, creeds and sexual orientations.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edwin Rothman of Elkins Park, former director of the Pennsylvania Economy League in Philadelphia, died Thursday, May 28, of heart failure at Abington Memorial Hospital. He had been ill for a short time. His family declined to release his age. As director of the Economy League's Eastern Division from 1972 to 1983, and research director before that, Dr. Rothman was an influential civic leader in Philadelphia. He had joined the nonprofit group in 1955 and wrote numerous reports that influenced government policy.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police have arrested two teenagers in a string of armed robberies that took place near Temple University's campus last month and mostly targeted students, said Capt. Frank Banford of Central Detectives. The teenagers, ages 17 and 16, were taken into custody Thursday. Banford said Detectives Ralph Domenic and James Waring used videotape footage of the suspects and tips from the public to track the two to their high school and from there learned their identities. The teens face charges in a spree of six stickups, all of which took place in the span of a week - including several on the same days, Banford said.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Xiaoxing Xi, the former chairman of Temple University's physics department, pleaded not guilty Thursday to charges of illegally sharing sensitive U.S. technology with entities in China. Xi, who is free on $100,000 bail, was formally arraigned on four counts of wire fraud. A trial date was not set. Regarded as a leader in superconductor research, Xi, 47, is accused of plotting to exploit technology he purchased from a U.S. company for the benefit of Chinese entities, including its government.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
WATCHING over Diamond Street near 33rd, the late jazz icon John Coltrane was depicted in a mural on a brick wall near the house where he overcame his heroin addiction. Coltrane is said to have played his sax in the park across the street; you could hear it throughout Strawberry Mansion. Last year the wall fell victim to development, replaced by a yard of neatly trimmed grass hemmed by pencil-thin trees and a wooden country fence. "Tribute to John Coltrane," completed by artist John Lewis in 2002, was one of several Philly murals destroyed in recent years.
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