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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE WAY David M. Jacobs sees it, aliens from outer space have been kidnapping humans for aeons and sexually molesting them to create human-alien hybrids that walk among us today undetected and will soon take over Earth. He knows that sounds crazy. But he long ago quit caring what people think of him. As director of the International Center for Abduction Research, Jacobs, 71, has made it his life's mission to investigate claims of extraterrestrial abduction. "What I'm doing will either be an interesting but nonessential footnote to popular culture or the most important thing that's ever happened to humankind.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University researchers have used state-of-the-art molecular scissors to cut out dormant HIV hiding in human cells, fueling hopes for curing - not just suppressing - the insidious infection that causes AIDS. The HIV removal experiment was conducted in cells in the lab, and the scissors did not work on every cell, so the approach is a long way from use in the clinic. Still, the study, published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows how new genetic editing technologies could be harnessed to conquer the AIDS virus.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 2011 memo from Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey hasn't stopped Philadelphia police officers from intimidating and arresting people who try to record them, the ACLU says. So the organization is hoping a little dose of public shaming will. It launched a social-media campaign Thursday urging city residents to tweet their stories of police harassment for recording law enforcement activity with the hashtag #PACopWatch. The group's efforts coincided with the filing of the organization's fourth federal lawsuit on behalf of a city resident arrested on what it described as questionable grounds.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old Temple University student was shot in the neck near the North Broad Street campus early Sunday, and a suspect is in custody, police said. The student was shot about 3:30 a.m. in the 1900 block of North Gratz Street, Philadelphia police said. He was treated at Temple University Hospital and was expected to be released, university police said in a statement. Philadelphia police withheld the victim's name. A department spokeswoman could not provide the suspect's name or any charges.
SPORTS
May 12, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The people began forming a line at 4 p.m., an hour before the church doors swung open, and some were still there as late as 10:15, 75 minutes after the scheduled ending. That thousands, despite rainy, dreary weather, turned out last night at St. Alphonsus Church, in Maple Glen, Montgomery County, to honor C. Robert "Bob" Harrington was an occurrence that should have surprised no one. He meant that much to that many. Harrington, 55, who first made a name for himself as a basketball player and coach, and then enhanced it by becoming a giant in labor relations as a vice president for personnel services and chief negotiator at Temple University, all the while nurturing old friendships and starting new ones and caring for his beloved family, died last Thursday after battling cancer for close to four years.
SPORTS
March 28, 2012 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Due to an unsettled offseason, the Big East Conference has finally released its 2012 football schedule. The conference had to deal with the departure of West Virginia before luring a former member that it had booted years earlier - Temple. For now, the Owls will have an 11-game schedule - including seven Big East foes - this coming season, with two bye weeks. That could change, as Temple is still looking to add a 12th opponent. So far, the Owls' schedule that was released on Tuesday is highlighted with games against Villanova, Penn State, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Cincinnati.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has tapped current provost and long-time administrator Richard M. Englert to serve as acting president while the search for a permanent successor continues. Englert, also senior vice president for academic affairs, becomes acting president on July 1 upon the exit of current president Ann Weaver Hart, Temple Board President Patrick O'Connor said Wednesday morning. The university is in the middle of a national search to replace Hart, who has served as president for six years and will become president of the University of Arizona.
SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY has asked a Canadian high school to stop using an owl mascot that looks very much like its own. Temple officials said Thursday that the school in Kelowna, British Columbia, has agreed to change its symbol. The Kelowna Daily Courier reported that the local high school's scowling bird was virtually identical to Temple's Hooter the Owl. Kelowna Secondary School began using the symbol in 2002, after Temple had trademarked its image. It's not clear how the mascots ended up looking alike.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | BY LINN WASHINGTON JR., For the Daily News
SOWETO, SOUTH AFRICA - Norman Nobela, a 21-year-old Soweto resident, traveled a few blocks from home to pitch in at yesterday's Mandela Day of Service, an annual event similar to the Martin Luther King Day of Service in Philadelphia. Working alongside him to spruce up the Emathonsini Old Age Home in the city's Moroka neighborhood were 11 students from Temple University who'd traveled about 8,000 miles farther. The Temple student helpers included three from the Philly area: Janice Durrant of Hunting Park, Cambriae Bates from Southwest Philadelphia and Taylor Lumpkin from Lumberton, N.J. Durrant said she found Mandela Day to be "so beautiful" because it attracts participants from all walks of life in South Africa, including the poorest of poor who "already have so little but get up to do something for someone else.
LIVING
March 6, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Classical music for babies. Foreign language tapes for toddlers. Today's parents are trying all sorts of things to stimulate their children in the hopes of maximizing brain power in the critical period right after birth. But do experiences in the early years - listening to Mozart or not - really determine how a child fares in the long run? In his 1999 book, The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning, child-education expert John Bruer debunks the popular notion that the most important period of brain development occurs before the age of 3. Bruer, who heads the James S. McDonnell Foundation in St. Louis, will join a panel of Philadelphia experts to discuss the "zero-to-three" theory at a symposium next Monday from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Temple University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bursting with anger at the growing death toll in the Gaza Strip, 300 pro-Palestinian demonstrators hurled invective through bullhorns Friday outside the Center City office tower that houses the Israeli consulate in Philadelphia. "Israel, Israel, what do you say?" they chanted. "How many kids have you killed today?" For nearly three weeks, Hamas militants in Gaza have rained incessant rocket fire on Israel, and the Israel Defense Forces have bombed Gaza and invaded the coastal strip.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE AMERICAN Civil Liberties Union and others yesterday filed a federal lawsuit against the city and two cops on behalf of a Temple University student who they say was unlawfully arrested last year when he photographed a group of cops gathered outside a North Philly house. The complaint follows previous cases in which cops allegedly assaulted or arrested other civilians who tried to film police actions in public and a September 2011 memorandum by Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey that instructed officers to allow themselves to be recorded.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University researchers have used state-of-the-art molecular scissors to cut out dormant HIV hiding in human cells, fueling hopes for curing - not just suppressing - the insidious infection that causes AIDS. The HIV removal experiment was conducted in cells in the lab, and the scissors did not work on every cell, so the approach is a long way from use in the clinic. Still, the study, published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows how new genetic editing technologies could be harnessed to conquer the AIDS virus.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
FIVE YEARS AGO, Devon Bailey was in a dark place. The "ex-corner boy," who used to sell marijuana and cocaine on city streets, had lost his wife to breast cancer and didn't have a job or any money. "I was in a downhill spiral, waking up every day, not having anything to do, except looking up at the ceiling," said Bailey, 36. That was when he first saw strangers clearing a garbage-strewn lot across the street from his grandfather's North Philadelphia auto mechanic shop. One day, as he watched those young adults - some college students, most of them poets, musicians or artists - try to build steps up an incline to a farming area, Bailey said to himself: "They don't know what they're doing.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | BY LINN WASHINGTON JR., For the Daily News
SOWETO, SOUTH AFRICA - Norman Nobela, a 21-year-old Soweto resident, traveled a few blocks from home to pitch in at yesterday's Mandela Day of Service, an annual event similar to the Martin Luther King Day of Service in Philadelphia. Working alongside him to spruce up the Emathonsini Old Age Home in the city's Moroka neighborhood were 11 students from Temple University who'd traveled about 8,000 miles farther. The Temple student helpers included three from the Philly area: Janice Durrant of Hunting Park, Cambriae Bates from Southwest Philadelphia and Taylor Lumpkin from Lumberton, N.J. Durrant said she found Mandela Day to be "so beautiful" because it attracts participants from all walks of life in South Africa, including the poorest of poor who "already have so little but get up to do something for someone else.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial celebration will be Saturday, July 26, for Howard E. Blake, 92, of Media, a former Temple University professor who died June 15 of renal failure at White Horse Village in Newtown Square. The event is planned for 3 p.m. at Tyler Arboretum, in Media. Burial is private. Born in 1922 in rural Fairfield, N.C., Dr. Blake was the son of farmers. "No one in my family - in fact, no one in Fairfield - had ever gone to college," he told his family. "I got a ride there on a truck that was delivering chickens.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University undergraduates will pay $600 more in tuition in the fall. In-state students will pay $14,006 in tuition, up from $13,406, and those from out of state will pay $24,032, up from $23,432. Mandatory student-activity fees, assessed on top of tuition, will remain at $690. The university's trustees approved the new tuition schedule at their meeting on Thursday. They also increased funding for student financial aid by more than $9.6 million. The amount set aside to aid students now totals approximately $100 million.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University has completed its review of an ethics complaint on a study conducted by two professors that described economic savings from private prisons - without disclosing that they had received funding from the prison industry. The university, however, will not disclose the findings or say whether any action was taken against the authors. "It's a personnel matter," Brandon Lausch, a Temple spokesman, said Wednesday. "I can't go into details. " He said the examination was concluded July 2. "They are fairly close-mouthed about their investigation," said Alex Friedmann, managing editor of the Prison Legal News and associate director of the Human Rights Defense Center, who filed the ethics complaint with Temple in June 2013.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE WAY David M. Jacobs sees it, aliens from outer space have been kidnapping humans for aeons and sexually molesting them to create human-alien hybrids that walk among us today undetected and will soon take over Earth. He knows that sounds crazy. But he long ago quit caring what people think of him. As director of the International Center for Abduction Research, Jacobs, 71, has made it his life's mission to investigate claims of extraterrestrial abduction. "What I'm doing will either be an interesting but nonessential footnote to popular culture or the most important thing that's ever happened to humankind.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angered by the Philadelphia School Reform Commission's decision to sell the shuttered William Penn High School to Temple University, a neighborhood group has made good on its threat to take legal action. The William Penn Development Coalition asked the state Supreme Court on Friday for an injunction to block the sale and to rule that the SRC's expedited process violated state law. A small contingent rallied Monday outside City Hall to announce the suit against the SRC and to publicize the community-based organization's campaign to buy the site in the Yorktown section of North Philadelphia for a school focused on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
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