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Temple University

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NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old Temple University student was shot in the neck near the North Broad Street campus early Sunday, and a suspect is in custody, police said. The student was shot about 3:30 a.m. in the 1900 block of North Gratz Street, Philadelphia police said. He was treated at Temple University Hospital and was expected to be released, university police said in a statement. Philadelphia police withheld the victim's name. A department spokeswoman could not provide the suspect's name or any charges.
SPORTS
May 12, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The people began forming a line at 4 p.m., an hour before the church doors swung open, and some were still there as late as 10:15, 75 minutes after the scheduled ending. That thousands, despite rainy, dreary weather, turned out last night at St. Alphonsus Church, in Maple Glen, Montgomery County, to honor C. Robert "Bob" Harrington was an occurrence that should have surprised no one. He meant that much to that many. Harrington, 55, who first made a name for himself as a basketball player and coach, and then enhanced it by becoming a giant in labor relations as a vice president for personnel services and chief negotiator at Temple University, all the while nurturing old friendships and starting new ones and caring for his beloved family, died last Thursday after battling cancer for close to four years.
SPORTS
March 28, 2012 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Due to an unsettled offseason, the Big East Conference has finally released its 2012 football schedule. The conference had to deal with the departure of West Virginia before luring a former member that it had booted years earlier - Temple. For now, the Owls will have an 11-game schedule - including seven Big East foes - this coming season, with two bye weeks. That could change, as Temple is still looking to add a 12th opponent. So far, the Owls' schedule that was released on Tuesday is highlighted with games against Villanova, Penn State, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Cincinnati.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
POLICE NABBED one suspect and were looking for another in the robberies of two men near Temple University last week. Philadelphia police said Robert Sherrill, 26, of Clarion Street near York, and a 19-year-old accomplice - one of whom had a handgun - allegedly approached a 21-year-old former Temple football player about 12:35 a.m. Oct. 15 at 10th Street and Susquehanna Avenue. Police said the two men tried to force the victim into his car, but he refused. Sherrill and the accomplice allegedly forced the man to the ground, taking his keys, a cellphone and his 2005 Cadillac CTS and fled down Susquehanna.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has tapped current provost and long-time administrator Richard M. Englert to serve as acting president while the search for a permanent successor continues. Englert, also senior vice president for academic affairs, becomes acting president on July 1 upon the exit of current president Ann Weaver Hart, Temple Board President Patrick O'Connor said Wednesday morning. The university is in the middle of a national search to replace Hart, who has served as president for six years and will become president of the University of Arizona.
SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY has asked a Canadian high school to stop using an owl mascot that looks very much like its own. Temple officials said Thursday that the school in Kelowna, British Columbia, has agreed to change its symbol. The Kelowna Daily Courier reported that the local high school's scowling bird was virtually identical to Temple's Hooter the Owl. Kelowna Secondary School began using the symbol in 2002, after Temple had trademarked its image. It's not clear how the mascots ended up looking alike.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
LAWYERS MIGHT HAVE one of the most joked-about jobs on Earth, but here in Philadelphia, they now are among the most celebrated: Temple University yesterday officially opened a national Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame. The hall was founded in 2009 by the Trial Lawyer magazine, but hasn't had a physical home until now. Its goal: to honor trial lawyers "who have left an indelible mark on the American legal tradition through a lifetime of service to the American public, the Constitution and the American trial bar," according to its website.
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DELORES M. Andy had two heroines. There was Goldie E. Watson, a legendary Philadelphia civil rights leader who ran the Model Cities Program and told Congress where to get off when it found her in contempt for not answering questions about Communism in the McCarthy-era Red scare. The other was Ida B. Wells, journalist, crusader for justice and women's rights firebrand of the 1920s. Goldie Watson, who died in 1994, had a direct influence on Delores Andy, leading her into civil rights causes, including the march to integrate Girard College in 1965.
LIVING
March 6, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Classical music for babies. Foreign language tapes for toddlers. Today's parents are trying all sorts of things to stimulate their children in the hopes of maximizing brain power in the critical period right after birth. But do experiences in the early years - listening to Mozart or not - really determine how a child fares in the long run? In his 1999 book, The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning, child-education expert John Bruer debunks the popular notion that the most important period of brain development occurs before the age of 3. Bruer, who heads the James S. McDonnell Foundation in St. Louis, will join a panel of Philadelphia experts to discuss the "zero-to-three" theory at a symposium next Monday from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Temple University.
NEWS
March 4, 2008
Working with Temple University officials, Philadelphia police took decisive action by charging four Temple students with the senseless beating of the grandson of a Holocaust survivor. The attackers reportedly shouted anti-Semitic slurs before pummeling the 23-year-old college student, a visitor to the North Broad Street campus who attends Penn State University. While the victim suffered a broken nose and orbital bone in his face, the hopeful news is that he is expected to recover fully, his father told a campus meeting on the attack late last week.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Jack Tomczuk and Susan Snyder, STAFF WRITERS
Temple University's board of trustees will hold a special meeting Monday to consider plans to move forward on a campus football stadium. President Neil D. Theobald told student government leaders at a packed meeting Monday that he would recommend that the project proceed. His announcement came as protesters demonstrated against the proposed 35,000-seat stadium, slated for the northwest corner of campus. The objections and chants became so loud and raucous that the university shut down the meeting 15 minutes early.
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, STAFF WRITER
Temple University basketball games soon may attract a new audience - in China. Five international students from China will vie Sunday to become Temple's official broadcasters of men's games in Mandarin. The two winners will do live broadcasts and highlight reels for the team's six remaining home games, starting Thursday against Tulsa. Their broadcasts will be streamed on Owl Sports, the official website of the athletic department, and the highlight reels on YouTube and Youku - China's version of YouTube.
NEWS
February 2, 2016
WHEN I was a student at Howard University back in the dark ages, classmates used to boast about coming from tough, inner-city neighborhoods. It was almost like playing the dozens, the way friends would try to one-up each others' tall tales. I don't remember, though, ever hearing anything back then that could compare with the experiences that some kids in Philly witness on a regular basis. I'm thinking of two murders involving youngsters that took place this past fall. All killings are tragic, but these were particularly heart-wrenching because they involved teens -- babies, really.
NEWS
January 25, 2016 | By Martha Woodall and Patricia Madej, Staff Writers
Buses carrying the Temple University women's gymnastics team and the Duquesne University men's basketball team were among more than 500 vehicles stranded Saturday for more than 24 hours in a blizzard and deep snows along a 40-mile stretch of the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Exhausted but safe, the gymnasts tweeted at 8:40 p.m. that they were finally moving to freedom. "Tears of joy," they tweeted with a video of a rousing celebration. The Duquesne team had rolled out about 10 minutes earlier.
NEWS
January 24, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Mention the "Mansion District" to many Philadelphians, and they will assume you're talking about Rittenhouse Square or Chestnut Hill. The city's official Mansion District can actually be found in North Philadelphia, just a block below Temple University. The enclave, officially known as the North Broad Street Mansion District, stretches west to 16th Street, between Master and Oxford, and is packed with more than two dozen Victorian, Italianate, and Beaux-Arts urban estates. Because this column has been exploring the architecture of North Broad, my focus is on the striking chocolate-brown and limestone houses near Jefferson Street that serve as the district's gateway.
NEWS
January 23, 2016
West Chester University will get an interim president April 1 - Christopher M. Fiorentino, the school's vice president of external operations. Fiorentino - who has his bachelor's, master's and doctorate degrees in economics from Temple University - has spent more than 20 years at West Chester as a faculty member, dean of the college of business and public affairs and vice president, a post he's held since 2013. The Board of Governors of Pennsylvania's 14-university State System of Higher Education announced his appointment on Thursday.
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
The week before her column was to appear in the student newspaper at Pennsylvania State University, Caroline Crasnick warned her parents: "Be prepared. " The 20-year-old media-studies major from Langhorne was about to lay bare for the University Park campus - and the Internet world - her battle with mental illness. She described being "curled up on the cold linoleum" floor of her State College apartment one autumn evening her sophomore year and thinking: "The world would be better off if I were dead.
NEWS
January 12, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
When Jalaal Hayes of North Philadelphia applied to a doctoral program in applied chemistry, even the admissions staff at Delaware State University did a double take. Hayes was but 18. Surely he had mistakenly checked the box next to graduate school. His application was dispatched to the undergraduate division. Eventually, it came back. The teenager, who had graduated from high school at 15, and from college at 18 - with two bachelor's degrees, no less - knew exactly what he was doing.
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