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Temple University

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NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old Temple University student was shot in the neck near the North Broad Street campus early Sunday, and a suspect is in custody, police said. The student was shot about 3:30 a.m. in the 1900 block of North Gratz Street, Philadelphia police said. He was treated at Temple University Hospital and was expected to be released, university police said in a statement. Philadelphia police withheld the victim's name. A department spokeswoman could not provide the suspect's name or any charges.
SPORTS
May 12, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The people began forming a line at 4 p.m., an hour before the church doors swung open, and some were still there as late as 10:15, 75 minutes after the scheduled ending. That thousands, despite rainy, dreary weather, turned out last night at St. Alphonsus Church, in Maple Glen, Montgomery County, to honor C. Robert "Bob" Harrington was an occurrence that should have surprised no one. He meant that much to that many. Harrington, 55, who first made a name for himself as a basketball player and coach, and then enhanced it by becoming a giant in labor relations as a vice president for personnel services and chief negotiator at Temple University, all the while nurturing old friendships and starting new ones and caring for his beloved family, died last Thursday after battling cancer for close to four years.
SPORTS
March 28, 2012 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Due to an unsettled offseason, the Big East Conference has finally released its 2012 football schedule. The conference had to deal with the departure of West Virginia before luring a former member that it had booted years earlier - Temple. For now, the Owls will have an 11-game schedule - including seven Big East foes - this coming season, with two bye weeks. That could change, as Temple is still looking to add a 12th opponent. So far, the Owls' schedule that was released on Tuesday is highlighted with games against Villanova, Penn State, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Cincinnati.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has tapped current provost and long-time administrator Richard M. Englert to serve as acting president while the search for a permanent successor continues. Englert, also senior vice president for academic affairs, becomes acting president on July 1 upon the exit of current president Ann Weaver Hart, Temple Board President Patrick O'Connor said Wednesday morning. The university is in the middle of a national search to replace Hart, who has served as president for six years and will become president of the University of Arizona.
SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY has asked a Canadian high school to stop using an owl mascot that looks very much like its own. Temple officials said Thursday that the school in Kelowna, British Columbia, has agreed to change its symbol. The Kelowna Daily Courier reported that the local high school's scowling bird was virtually identical to Temple's Hooter the Owl. Kelowna Secondary School began using the symbol in 2002, after Temple had trademarked its image. It's not clear how the mascots ended up looking alike.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
LAWYERS MIGHT HAVE one of the most joked-about jobs on Earth, but here in Philadelphia, they now are among the most celebrated: Temple University yesterday officially opened a national Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame. The hall was founded in 2009 by the Trial Lawyer magazine, but hasn't had a physical home until now. Its goal: to honor trial lawyers "who have left an indelible mark on the American legal tradition through a lifetime of service to the American public, the Constitution and the American trial bar," according to its website.
NEWS
December 8, 2010 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple's ongoing construction will be substantial but will not push further into residential areas of North Philadelphia, university president Ann Weaver Hart said Tuesday. Hart, in a meeting with the Inquirer Editorial Board, disclosed details of the $1.2 billion expansion of Temple's main campus, saying the size of the university's footprint in North Philadelphia will not increase. As The Inquirer reported last year, Temple's expansion will develop the university's Broad Street corridor.
LIVING
March 6, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Classical music for babies. Foreign language tapes for toddlers. Today's parents are trying all sorts of things to stimulate their children in the hopes of maximizing brain power in the critical period right after birth. But do experiences in the early years - listening to Mozart or not - really determine how a child fares in the long run? In his 1999 book, The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning, child-education expert John Bruer debunks the popular notion that the most important period of brain development occurs before the age of 3. Bruer, who heads the James S. McDonnell Foundation in St. Louis, will join a panel of Philadelphia experts to discuss the "zero-to-three" theory at a symposium next Monday from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Temple University.
NEWS
March 4, 2008
Working with Temple University officials, Philadelphia police took decisive action by charging four Temple students with the senseless beating of the grandson of a Holocaust survivor. The attackers reportedly shouted anti-Semitic slurs before pummeling the 23-year-old college student, a visitor to the North Broad Street campus who attends Penn State University. While the victim suffered a broken nose and orbital bone in his face, the hopeful news is that he is expected to recover fully, his father told a campus meeting on the attack late last week.
NEWS
December 29, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University's incoming president will take office Monday, but will postpone laying out his agenda in an inauguration speech until October. Neil D. Theobald, whose inauguration had been scheduled for April, said he wanted more time to learn about the 39,000-student university before formulating a solid plan for the future. "The goal is to listen - what should our priorities be? - and discuss them," said Theobald, 56, who has just finished his tenure as senior vice president and chief financial officer at Indiana University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter said Thursday that his successor must understand the importance of preventing youth violence if Philadelphia is to thrive. "You know what year it is," he told a room crowded with educators, politicians, and youth outreach groups on Temple University's campus. "I will go. But the work, the effort, and the impact, must continue. Whoever comes next must understand how critically important, how critically vital, how impactful this work is. " The city has made some important progress, he noted: homicides are down, employment is up, and development is booming.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan S. Schmidt, 85, of Blue Bell, a professor at the former Beaver College, where she taught education for many years, died Friday, Feb. 6, of Alzheimer's disease at Foulkeways at Gwynedd. "Dr. Joan," as she was called informally, was a loving mother, grandmother, and devoted mentor to her students. Born in Philadelphia to immigrant parents from Stuttgart, Germany, just before the 1929 stock-market crash, she grew up in Germantown and attended Friends Select School. Dr. Schmidt graduated from Chestnut Hill College and took a job teaching sixth grade at Whitemarsh Elementary School.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com 215-854-4890
YOUTH VIOLENCE is a disease and it spreads like a virus, Mayor Nutter told about 75 people at a Temple University conference yesterday. Attendees included activists, educators and members of the mayor's Youth Violence Prevention Collaborative. "Violence is a public-health crisis," Nutter said. "It is a disease. We know how to treat disease. " Nutter cited a $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to the city and Temple to set up Ceasefire Philly, an offshoot of a Chicago-based group that uses methods and strategies similar to disease control to stop violence in communities.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard F. Rafferty, 87, of Warrington, a teacher who rose to become an associate superintendent of the Philadelphia School District, died Thursday, Feb. 12, of complications from a stroke at Neshaminy Manor. Dr. Rafferty's career with the city's schools spanned four decades starting in 1949, when he signed on as a teacher at McKean Elementary School. In the early 1950s, he taught social studies at Bartlett Junior High School, where he was promoted to vice principal. He went on to become principal of Stanton Elementary School and then Harding Junior High School, Daniel Boone Remedial Disciplinary School, and Lincoln High School.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Urban Outfitters , the South Philly-based group of store chains that mostly sells women's apparel, said Monday it will use the one million-square-foot, 500-worker warehouse it has been building over the last year near Gap, Lancaster County, to replace its 10-year-old "Ecommerce Fulfillment Center" in Trenton, S.C. Urban Outfitters opened the Southern distribution center and moved 200 jobs there from the Philadelphia area 10 years ago. The...
BUSINESS
February 14, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The decision to suspend Nightly News anchor Brian Williams for six months without pay is the latest unwelcome development at an NBCUniversal News Group division that has become a nagging and highly public trouble spot for Comcast Corp. The problems at NBC News, which date to Ann Curry's tearful on-air goodbye as Today co-host in June 2012, have stretched over two news-division leadership regimes. Williams' suspension now threatens months of speculation on his ultimate fate at the ratings leader Nightly News . "It's a noisy problem, and it plays out in the public," said Frank Sesno, director of the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | By Sarai Flores and Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writers
Stephen Timothy Roll, 61, of Bala Cynwyd, an executive at WHYY for more than two decades, died Friday, Feb. 6, of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Known as Tim, Mr. Roll had a long career in the Philadelphia radio and TV industry. He was a manager of corporate underwriting at WHYY, where he worked for 24 years. In his role with WHYY, Mr. Roll sold advertising spots to corporate and nonprofit clients across all platforms - radio, TV and on www.whyy.org . Before that, Mr. Roll worked in radio advertising sales for WCAU-AM, KYW-AM, and WMGK-FM.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Beck Hansen's album Morning Phase , a becalmed collection from the changeling California songwriter, was surprise winner for album of the year at the 57th annual Grammy awards at the Staples Center in Los Angeles on Sunday. The show was otherwise dominated by 22-year-old British crooner Sam Smith, who won best new artist as well as song and record of the year, and pop vocal performance. "This is the best night of my life," said Smith, in picking up his crowning record of the year trophy for "Stay With Me (Darkchild Version)
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James R. Koller, 63, of Lafayette Hill, a lawyer and real estate developer, died Tuesday, Feb. 3, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease, at home. Mr. Koller cofounded the Blue Bell-based Vesterra Corp., a commercial real estate development company specializing in shopping center and apartment complexes. Prior to creating Vesterra, he practiced real estate law at Dilworth Paxson L.L.P. in Philadelphia. Mr. Koller was a fitness buff before his illness was diagnosed six years ago. He swam, lifted weights, or biked six days a week for more than 20 years.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Going by her resumé, Sue Cornbluth knows child abuse. She has a doctorate in psychology and claims to be a "nationally recognized mental health expert. " She teaches at Temple University and has appeared on television to discuss traumas such as the Jerry Sandusky scandal. But Cornbluth lacks a state license. And now she is accused of perjury for allegedly lying about it. The felony charge, filed last week in Bucks County, states that Cornbluth claimed to have a license when she served as an expert witness in a 2013 custody battle.
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