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Temple University

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NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old Temple University student was shot in the neck near the North Broad Street campus early Sunday, and a suspect is in custody, police said. The student was shot about 3:30 a.m. in the 1900 block of North Gratz Street, Philadelphia police said. He was treated at Temple University Hospital and was expected to be released, university police said in a statement. Philadelphia police withheld the victim's name. A department spokeswoman could not provide the suspect's name or any charges.
SPORTS
May 12, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The people began forming a line at 4 p.m., an hour before the church doors swung open, and some were still there as late as 10:15, 75 minutes after the scheduled ending. That thousands, despite rainy, dreary weather, turned out last night at St. Alphonsus Church, in Maple Glen, Montgomery County, to honor C. Robert "Bob" Harrington was an occurrence that should have surprised no one. He meant that much to that many. Harrington, 55, who first made a name for himself as a basketball player and coach, and then enhanced it by becoming a giant in labor relations as a vice president for personnel services and chief negotiator at Temple University, all the while nurturing old friendships and starting new ones and caring for his beloved family, died last Thursday after battling cancer for close to four years.
SPORTS
March 28, 2012 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Due to an unsettled offseason, the Big East Conference has finally released its 2012 football schedule. The conference had to deal with the departure of West Virginia before luring a former member that it had booted years earlier - Temple. For now, the Owls will have an 11-game schedule - including seven Big East foes - this coming season, with two bye weeks. That could change, as Temple is still looking to add a 12th opponent. So far, the Owls' schedule that was released on Tuesday is highlighted with games against Villanova, Penn State, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Cincinnati.
SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY has asked a Canadian high school to stop using an owl mascot that looks very much like its own. Temple officials said Thursday that the school in Kelowna, British Columbia, has agreed to change its symbol. The Kelowna Daily Courier reported that the local high school's scowling bird was virtually identical to Temple's Hooter the Owl. Kelowna Secondary School began using the symbol in 2002, after Temple had trademarked its image. It's not clear how the mascots ended up looking alike.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has tapped current provost and long-time administrator Richard M. Englert to serve as acting president while the search for a permanent successor continues. Englert, also senior vice president for academic affairs, becomes acting president on July 1 upon the exit of current president Ann Weaver Hart, Temple Board President Patrick O'Connor said Wednesday morning. The university is in the middle of a national search to replace Hart, who has served as president for six years and will become president of the University of Arizona.
NEWS
December 8, 2010 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple's ongoing construction will be substantial but will not push further into residential areas of North Philadelphia, university president Ann Weaver Hart said Tuesday. Hart, in a meeting with the Inquirer Editorial Board, disclosed details of the $1.2 billion expansion of Temple's main campus, saying the size of the university's footprint in North Philadelphia will not increase. As The Inquirer reported last year, Temple's expansion will develop the university's Broad Street corridor.
LIVING
March 6, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Classical music for babies. Foreign language tapes for toddlers. Today's parents are trying all sorts of things to stimulate their children in the hopes of maximizing brain power in the critical period right after birth. But do experiences in the early years - listening to Mozart or not - really determine how a child fares in the long run? In his 1999 book, The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning, child-education expert John Bruer debunks the popular notion that the most important period of brain development occurs before the age of 3. Bruer, who heads the James S. McDonnell Foundation in St. Louis, will join a panel of Philadelphia experts to discuss the "zero-to-three" theory at a symposium next Monday from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Temple University.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
LAWYERS MIGHT HAVE one of the most joked-about jobs on Earth, but here in Philadelphia, they now are among the most celebrated: Temple University yesterday officially opened a national Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame. The hall was founded in 2009 by the Trial Lawyer magazine, but hasn't had a physical home until now. Its goal: to honor trial lawyers "who have left an indelible mark on the American legal tradition through a lifetime of service to the American public, the Constitution and the American trial bar," according to its website.
NEWS
July 2, 2011 | By Drew Singer and Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writers
A day after Gov. Corbett signed a state budget that cuts funding for higher education, Temple University announced Friday that it would raise tuition nearly 10 percent for Pennsylvania students. Though the $27.15 billion budget was a done deal, the funding cuts continued to draw protests. About 50 people gathered Friday outside Corbett's satellite office in Center City to denounce the reductions. The 2011-12 budget reduces funding to four state-related universities, including Temple, by 19 percent.
NEWS
March 4, 2008
Working with Temple University officials, Philadelphia police took decisive action by charging four Temple students with the senseless beating of the grandson of a Holocaust survivor. The attackers reportedly shouted anti-Semitic slurs before pummeling the 23-year-old college student, a visitor to the North Broad Street campus who attends Penn State University. While the victim suffered a broken nose and orbital bone in his face, the hopeful news is that he is expected to recover fully, his father told a campus meeting on the attack late last week.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
WHEN MAYOR Nutter proposed hiking property taxes 9.3 percent to give $105 million to the struggling school district two weeks ago, not one member of City Council gave a thumbs up. Instead, many said they'd come up with other ways to help the schools. Yesterday, at-large Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. introduced a resolution which he said would generate millions, though he stopped short of estimating just how many millions. The resolution calls for the Nutter administration to ask large nonprofit institutions - think universities and hospitals - to voluntarily contribute money for the schools.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raymond L. Freudberg, 92, formerly of Wyncote, a retired insurance company executive, died Wednesday, March 4, of heart failure at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr, where he had lived for 41/2 years. Born in Philadelphia to Herman and Rose Kierson Freudberg, Mr. Freudberg graduated from Olney High School in 1939 and took night courses at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1942. From 1942 to 1946 he served in Washington, in the finance division of the Air Transport Command, part of the Army Air Forces.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward A. Wiggins, 81, a former Pennsylvania legislator who represented a district in South Philadelphia during the 1970s and 1980s, died Sunday, March 8, of heart failure at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He was pronounced dead at the hospital after being rushed from his home in the King Village section of South Philadelphia, said his granddaughter Laurena Tolson. Mr. Wiggins was elected to the state House in 1976, was unseated in 1978, and won again in 1980.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University wants to do better: more freshmen coming back as sophomores, more students passing all classes in the right sequence, more students graduating in four years. Within a few years, according to current plans, every Rowan student will meet regularly with an assigned professional academic adviser and a faculty mentor, with the goal of boosting retention and graduation rates. "If we are going to maximize the impact of education and minimize its cost, then make sure that as many people who come in graduate with a degree and do so in as little time as possible.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU WERE FEELING a bit low and you were fortunate enough to be related to or just a friend of Willie Lois Adams, you wouldn't be down for long. "No matter what may have been going on in the world to tear you down, it only took one smile, one kind word or one hug to make you feel rejuvenated again," her family said. Willie was known as Granny - "because of her loving and compassionate demeanor. Granny's warm heart spread love and cheer even to the casual acquaintance. Willie was truly a person who was loved by all. " She died Feb. 14 at age 96. Willie was born in Wake Forest, N.C., to Willie Dunn and Mary Land.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2015 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Two days after Concha Alborg's husband died of cancer in January 2006, she asked her younger daughter to help her search his computer for the love notes she had requested he leave her. They logged in, and there they were: hundreds of letters, sorted and labeled in folders, along with photos and references to trips - not to Alborg, but to Jamie, Juanita, Josie, Dodi, Peggy . . . Peter Segal, Alborg's husband of 21 years, had been a serial cheater....
SPORTS
February 25, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kevin DeCaesar always wanted to play football for a Division I program. He will get his chance at Temple University. A first-team all-South Jersey linebacker as a senior, DeCaesar has decided to attend Temple and try to make the Owls' roster as a preferred walk-on. "I know it's going to be a challenge," DeCaesar said. "These players are no joke. I know I'm going to have to work hard, a lot harder than I've ever worked. " DeCaesar was a three-year starter at linebacker for West Deptford.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The first Philadelphia Collegiate Stock Competition, hosted by Temple University on April 11, will feature student stock pickers from Temple, Drexel, Villanova, La Salle, St. Joseph's, and Rutgers Universities. The competition is the brainchild of Temple students managing an investment fund at the university's Fox School of Business. By running the William C. Dunkelberg Owl Fund, students gain experience for careers in investment finance. Owl Fund assets have grown to nearly $250,000 at year end 2014 from $200,000 originally donated in 2012.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan S. Schmidt, 85, of Blue Bell, a professor at the former Beaver College, where she taught education for many years, died Friday, Feb. 6, of Alzheimer's disease at Foulkeways at Gwynedd. "Dr. Joan," as she was called informally, was a loving mother, grandmother, and devoted mentor to her students. Born in Philadelphia to immigrant parents from Stuttgart, Germany, just before the 1929 stock-market crash, she grew up in Germantown and attended Friends Select School. Dr. Schmidt graduated from Chestnut Hill College and took a job teaching sixth grade at Whitemarsh Elementary School.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter said Thursday that his successor must understand the importance of preventing youth violence if Philadelphia is to thrive. "You know what year it is," he told a room crowded with educators, politicians, and youth outreach groups on Temple University's campus. "I will go. But the work, the effort, and the impact, must continue. Whoever comes next must understand how critically important, how critically vital, how impactful this work is. " The city has made some important progress, he noted: homicides are down, employment is up, and development is booming.
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