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Temple University

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NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old Temple University student was shot in the neck near the North Broad Street campus early Sunday, and a suspect is in custody, police said. The student was shot about 3:30 a.m. in the 1900 block of North Gratz Street, Philadelphia police said. He was treated at Temple University Hospital and was expected to be released, university police said in a statement. Philadelphia police withheld the victim's name. A department spokeswoman could not provide the suspect's name or any charges.
SPORTS
May 12, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The people began forming a line at 4 p.m., an hour before the church doors swung open, and some were still there as late as 10:15, 75 minutes after the scheduled ending. That thousands, despite rainy, dreary weather, turned out last night at St. Alphonsus Church, in Maple Glen, Montgomery County, to honor C. Robert "Bob" Harrington was an occurrence that should have surprised no one. He meant that much to that many. Harrington, 55, who first made a name for himself as a basketball player and coach, and then enhanced it by becoming a giant in labor relations as a vice president for personnel services and chief negotiator at Temple University, all the while nurturing old friendships and starting new ones and caring for his beloved family, died last Thursday after battling cancer for close to four years.
SPORTS
March 28, 2012 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Due to an unsettled offseason, the Big East Conference has finally released its 2012 football schedule. The conference had to deal with the departure of West Virginia before luring a former member that it had booted years earlier - Temple. For now, the Owls will have an 11-game schedule - including seven Big East foes - this coming season, with two bye weeks. That could change, as Temple is still looking to add a 12th opponent. So far, the Owls' schedule that was released on Tuesday is highlighted with games against Villanova, Penn State, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Cincinnati.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has tapped current provost and long-time administrator Richard M. Englert to serve as acting president while the search for a permanent successor continues. Englert, also senior vice president for academic affairs, becomes acting president on July 1 upon the exit of current president Ann Weaver Hart, Temple Board President Patrick O'Connor said Wednesday morning. The university is in the middle of a national search to replace Hart, who has served as president for six years and will become president of the University of Arizona.
SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY has asked a Canadian high school to stop using an owl mascot that looks very much like its own. Temple officials said Thursday that the school in Kelowna, British Columbia, has agreed to change its symbol. The Kelowna Daily Courier reported that the local high school's scowling bird was virtually identical to Temple's Hooter the Owl. Kelowna Secondary School began using the symbol in 2002, after Temple had trademarked its image. It's not clear how the mascots ended up looking alike.
NEWS
July 2, 2011 | By Drew Singer and Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writers
A day after Gov. Corbett signed a state budget that cuts funding for higher education, Temple University announced Friday that it would raise tuition nearly 10 percent for Pennsylvania students. Though the $27.15 billion budget was a done deal, the funding cuts continued to draw protests. About 50 people gathered Friday outside Corbett's satellite office in Center City to denounce the reductions. The 2011-12 budget reduces funding to four state-related universities, including Temple, by 19 percent.
LIVING
March 6, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Classical music for babies. Foreign language tapes for toddlers. Today's parents are trying all sorts of things to stimulate their children in the hopes of maximizing brain power in the critical period right after birth. But do experiences in the early years - listening to Mozart or not - really determine how a child fares in the long run? In his 1999 book, The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning, child-education expert John Bruer debunks the popular notion that the most important period of brain development occurs before the age of 3. Bruer, who heads the James S. McDonnell Foundation in St. Louis, will join a panel of Philadelphia experts to discuss the "zero-to-three" theory at a symposium next Monday from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Temple University.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
LAWYERS MIGHT HAVE one of the most joked-about jobs on Earth, but here in Philadelphia, they now are among the most celebrated: Temple University yesterday officially opened a national Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame. The hall was founded in 2009 by the Trial Lawyer magazine, but hasn't had a physical home until now. Its goal: to honor trial lawyers "who have left an indelible mark on the American legal tradition through a lifetime of service to the American public, the Constitution and the American trial bar," according to its website.
NEWS
March 4, 2008
Working with Temple University officials, Philadelphia police took decisive action by charging four Temple students with the senseless beating of the grandson of a Holocaust survivor. The attackers reportedly shouted anti-Semitic slurs before pummeling the 23-year-old college student, a visitor to the North Broad Street campus who attends Penn State University. While the victim suffered a broken nose and orbital bone in his face, the hopeful news is that he is expected to recover fully, his father told a campus meeting on the attack late last week.
NEWS
December 29, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University's incoming president will take office Monday, but will postpone laying out his agenda in an inauguration speech until October. Neil D. Theobald, whose inauguration had been scheduled for April, said he wanted more time to learn about the 39,000-student university before formulating a solid plan for the future. "The goal is to listen - what should our priorities be? - and discuss them," said Theobald, 56, who has just finished his tenure as senior vice president and chief financial officer at Indiana University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 7, 2015
An item in "On the Boards" Monday on appointments to the Temple University board of trustees incorrectly reported that trustee Patrick V. Larkin, area president for Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., was retired. Larkin is not retired and actively serves as the company's area president. A story Saturday on the Starz TV show Outlander wrongly described the number of episodes. There will be eight new episodes shown this spring for a season total of 16.
SPORTS
April 2, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News taff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
NEW YORK - When you make it this far in the NIT, after getting your heart broken by the NCAA on Selection Sunday, you obviously want the ride to last all the way to the end. But that's hard to do when you miss your last 16 shots from the arc, which is what Temple did last night at Madison Square Garden. The last was from the left wing, by Quenton DeCosey, with the clock winding down. It bounced off the back of the rim. And the season came to a close in the first game of the NIT semifinal doubleheader, 60-57, against a Miami team that had trailed by double digits late in the first half.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE PHILADELPHIA Coalition for Affordable Communities yesterday called for a new "anti-speculation tax" that would increase the real-estate transfer tax by 1.5 percent for certain properties that are "flipped" by investors. "By increasing the Realty Transfer Tax by 1.5 percent, we could generate $12 million for the Philadelphia Housing Trust Fund every year," according to the report, titled "Development Without Displacement. " The housing trust fund provides money, usually to community development corporations or other nonprofits, to develop new affordable housing and help existing homeowners make critical repairs.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
"SLAVERY is not an obsolete relic of the past, it is a global industry that generates $32 billion in profits through forced labor and the bodies of tens of millions of human beings each year. " This is what Ivan Cole, who sits on the board of the Life After Trauma Organization, told an audience yesterday during a conference hosted by the nonprofit at Temple University to raise awareness of the pervasiveness of human trafficking. LATO helps women recover from the trauma of human trafficking.
NEWS
March 29, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
A day after City Council called on Mayor Nutter to ask tax-exempt nonprofit organizations to make voluntary payments to help fund city schools, Nutter expressed ambivalence toward the proposal. "I think we all know I can't order the nonprofits to give us money for anything," Nutter said. "I don't think a PILOT program here or, demonstrated in any other city, is the kind of sustainable, long-term, serious funding that our school system needs. " Nevertheless, Nutter said he would review the resolution, which passed on a 16-1 vote.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five days after Christmas, Tommy Joshua received an e-mail from a Philadelphia Housing Authority official that threatened to bulldoze the preceding three years of his life. The agency would be testing soil on land it owned in Sharswood, a neighborhood defined by its two 18-story project towers and the expanse of vacant land that surrounds them. Joshua put on his boots. With a dozen neighbors Jan. 6, he walked five blocks to prevent the PHA from digging into its own property at 24th and Bolton Streets, once an eyesore and now something promising, named North Philly Peace Park.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
David A. Bresler, 61, of Meadowbrook, known to many small patients throughout the area as "the kids' dentist," died Saturday, March 21, from complications of surgery at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Dr. Bresler opened his first pediatric dental office in Roxborough in 1982 and in the next 30 years expanded to Dresher, Jenkintown, Newtown Square, and South and Northeast Philadelphia. Dr. Bresler developed a dental-care model for all children, regardless of family income. He was owner- operator of Doc Bresler's Cavity Busters - a multilocation, multi-dentist practice providing pediatric dentistry, general dentistry, and orthodontics.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Pennsylvania State University, women compose about 46 percent of the student body. But the percentage of women who make decisions about the university's direction - those serving on the board of trustees - is far less. Only six women currently sit on the 32-member board, 18 percent. And some of those women say that's not enough. "When we're too alike in background and perspective, our collective judgment feels right and rational, when it may actually be limited and flat-out wrong," said Barbara Doran, a private wealth portfolio manager for Morgan Stanley in New York.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
WHEN MAYOR Nutter proposed hiking property taxes 9.3 percent to give $105 million to the struggling school district two weeks ago, not one member of City Council gave a thumbs up. Instead, many said they'd come up with other ways to help the schools. Yesterday, at-large Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. introduced a resolution which he said would generate millions, though he stopped short of estimating just how many millions. The resolution calls for the Nutter administration to ask large nonprofit institutions - think universities and hospitals - to voluntarily contribute money for the schools.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raymond L. Freudberg, 92, formerly of Wyncote, a retired insurance company executive, died Wednesday, March 4, of heart failure at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr, where he had lived for 41/2 years. Born in Philadelphia to Herman and Rose Kierson Freudberg, Mr. Freudberg graduated from Olney High School in 1939 and took night courses at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1942. From 1942 to 1946 he served in Washington, in the finance division of the Air Transport Command, part of the Army Air Forces.
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