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NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old Temple University student was shot in the neck near the North Broad Street campus early Sunday, and a suspect is in custody, police said. The student was shot about 3:30 a.m. in the 1900 block of North Gratz Street, Philadelphia police said. He was treated at Temple University Hospital and was expected to be released, university police said in a statement. Philadelphia police withheld the victim's name. A department spokeswoman could not provide the suspect's name or any charges.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
AN ACADEMIC ADVISER at Temple University's College of Science and Technology is using a former supervisor's doctoral writings as evidence in a federal lawsuit alleging he was denied a promotion because of race. Kenneth L. Ruff, who is African-American, filed the suit yesterday in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Ruff's suit said he was the only African-American among five advisers in October 2010, when the academic advising program was reorganized.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
IN YET ANOTHER blow to Temple University's African American Studies Department, another professor, Iyelli Ichile, has suddenly resigned - three weeks before the start of the new school year. Ichile, who taught African-American studies and served as the undergraduate chairwoman, resigned Monday, citing family reasons, according to department chairman Molefi Asante. Classes at Temple are set to begin Aug. 25. The department was the target of protests last spring over the firing of professor Anthony Monteiro.
SPORTS
May 12, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The people began forming a line at 4 p.m., an hour before the church doors swung open, and some were still there as late as 10:15, 75 minutes after the scheduled ending. That thousands, despite rainy, dreary weather, turned out last night at St. Alphonsus Church, in Maple Glen, Montgomery County, to honor C. Robert "Bob" Harrington was an occurrence that should have surprised no one. He meant that much to that many. Harrington, 55, who first made a name for himself as a basketball player and coach, and then enhanced it by becoming a giant in labor relations as a vice president for personnel services and chief negotiator at Temple University, all the while nurturing old friendships and starting new ones and caring for his beloved family, died last Thursday after battling cancer for close to four years.
SPORTS
March 28, 2012 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Due to an unsettled offseason, the Big East Conference has finally released its 2012 football schedule. The conference had to deal with the departure of West Virginia before luring a former member that it had booted years earlier - Temple. For now, the Owls will have an 11-game schedule - including seven Big East foes - this coming season, with two bye weeks. That could change, as Temple is still looking to add a 12th opponent. So far, the Owls' schedule that was released on Tuesday is highlighted with games against Villanova, Penn State, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Cincinnati.
SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY has asked a Canadian high school to stop using an owl mascot that looks very much like its own. Temple officials said Thursday that the school in Kelowna, British Columbia, has agreed to change its symbol. The Kelowna Daily Courier reported that the local high school's scowling bird was virtually identical to Temple's Hooter the Owl. Kelowna Secondary School began using the symbol in 2002, after Temple had trademarked its image. It's not clear how the mascots ended up looking alike.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has tapped current provost and long-time administrator Richard M. Englert to serve as acting president while the search for a permanent successor continues. Englert, also senior vice president for academic affairs, becomes acting president on July 1 upon the exit of current president Ann Weaver Hart, Temple Board President Patrick O'Connor said Wednesday morning. The university is in the middle of a national search to replace Hart, who has served as president for six years and will become president of the University of Arizona.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE WAY David M. Jacobs sees it, aliens from outer space have been kidnapping humans for aeons and sexually molesting them to create human-alien hybrids that walk among us today undetected and will soon take over Earth. He knows that sounds crazy. But he long ago quit caring what people think of him. As director of the International Center for Abduction Research, Jacobs, 71, has made it his life's mission to investigate claims of extraterrestrial abduction. "What I'm doing will either be an interesting but nonessential footnote to popular culture or the most important thing that's ever happened to humankind.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IVORY DEWITT had a special interest in the needs of urban young men. As a leader of Project Alpha, Ivory helped to educate young men on the responsibilities of fatherhood, relationships with others and their connection with the greater community. "It was an effort to motivate young men to make decisions about their goals and values," his family wrote in a tribute. Ivory felt a strong responsibility to help others. At Thanksgiving, he was distributing food baskets to the needy.
LIVING
March 6, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Classical music for babies. Foreign language tapes for toddlers. Today's parents are trying all sorts of things to stimulate their children in the hopes of maximizing brain power in the critical period right after birth. But do experiences in the early years - listening to Mozart or not - really determine how a child fares in the long run? In his 1999 book, The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning, child-education expert John Bruer debunks the popular notion that the most important period of brain development occurs before the age of 3. Bruer, who heads the James S. McDonnell Foundation in St. Louis, will join a panel of Philadelphia experts to discuss the "zero-to-three" theory at a symposium next Monday from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Temple University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
AN ACADEMIC ADVISER at Temple University's College of Science and Technology is using a former supervisor's doctoral writings as evidence in a federal lawsuit alleging he was denied a promotion because of race. Kenneth L. Ruff, who is African-American, filed the suit yesterday in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Ruff's suit said he was the only African-American among five advisers in October 2010, when the academic advising program was reorganized.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Franziska Holzschuh, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony H. Murray Jr. was one the first Americans to arrive in Japan after World War II, and he brought back a souvenir: a sword a Japanese soldier had traded for a carton of cigarettes. "You could probably call my father adventurous," said son Anthony H. III. Mr. Murray, 88, a rear admiral, lawyer, and real estate broker, died Saturday, Aug. 16. He had been superintendent of the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia, appointed by President Ronald Reagan. Born in Bethlehem, Pa., the oldest of seven children, Mr. Murray graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1944 and attended the Pennsylvania Maritime Academy onboard the school ship Keystone State.
NEWS
August 16, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
The men's gymnastics coach at Temple University said he has raised more than $76,000 in donations for the program, which was cut by the university's board of trustees earlier this year. Fred Turoff, who is in his 38th season in charge of the program at the university, said a fund-raiser Thursday night featuring Temple alum Bill Cosby at the Independence Visitor Center was expected to bring in at least an additional $10,000. The event, billed as "An Evening With Bill Cosby: To Save the Temple Men's Gymnastics Program," was expected to draw about 200 people who paid up to $500 per couple to attend.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
KEN CHADWICK had family photos plastered on the walls of his office at Temple University Health System, of which he was associate vice president for real estate and leasing. The photos told associates and visitors where Ken's heart lay. The pictures were of his wife, Gretchen, their five boys and their grandchildren, smiling happily for the camera. And why shouldn't they have been happy? They had their doting husband, father and grandfather to spoil them rotten. "Ken loved more than anything to talk about Gretchen, their boys and grandchildren, and the time they spent together," said Alan N. Rosenberg, senior vice president and chief of staff of the health system.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IVORY DEWITT had a special interest in the needs of urban young men. As a leader of Project Alpha, Ivory helped to educate young men on the responsibilities of fatherhood, relationships with others and their connection with the greater community. "It was an effort to motivate young men to make decisions about their goals and values," his family wrote in a tribute. Ivory felt a strong responsibility to help others. At Thanksgiving, he was distributing food baskets to the needy.
NEWS
August 14, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AS AN EDUCATOR for five decades, Anna Young always took special interest in the often-unmet needs of urban students. In fact, the longtime English teacher wrote a book on the subject, Relationship of Writing and Self-Esteem Among Urban High School Students , in which she discussed how proficiency in self-expression could help city kids feel better about themselves and their place in the world. Far ahead of her time, Anna Young actually was one of the first African-American teachers in the Philadelphia School District when she began her career in the 1940s.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
IN YET ANOTHER blow to Temple University's African American Studies Department, another professor, Iyelli Ichile, has suddenly resigned - three weeks before the start of the new school year. Ichile, who taught African-American studies and served as the undergraduate chairwoman, resigned Monday, citing family reasons, according to department chairman Molefi Asante. Classes at Temple are set to begin Aug. 25. The department was the target of protests last spring over the firing of professor Anthony Monteiro.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School District has asked the state Supreme Court to swiftly reject a lawsuit that aims to block the sale of William Penn High School to Temple University. The cash-strapped schools desperately need the $15 million from the sale of the North Philadelphia property, according to court documents the district filed last week. The district's deficit - which already stands at $81 million - would grow by $11 million without the net proceeds from the sale. "Any delay in closing the sale and receiving these funds will harm the School District greatly," the district said in a court filing that asks the justices to act on the matter "as soon as reasonably possible.
NEWS
August 6, 2014
KUDOS to Temple University for its commitment to access and diversity and its bold and courageous move to make the SAT or ACT an option and not a requirement for admission to the university beginning fall 2015. Temple becomes the first national public research university in the Northeast to make standardized test scores optional. In looking at the whole picture and a student's entire high-school body of work - GPA, class rank, rigorous subject choices, overall achievement - and recognizing that there do exist intelligent and outstanding students who may not standardized-test well, Temple is helping to ensure that many more deserving students with the potential to make an impact on the university and on the world do not fall through the cracks and are now given the opportunity to attend Temple.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former director of the University of Pennsylvania's campus fitness center waived a preliminary hearing Monday on charges that she stole cash and items from the center's lost and found. Amy M. Wagner, 45, who was fired by the university in May, briefly appeared with lawyer Mariana Rossman before Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Nazario Jimenez Jr. With the waiver of a preliminary hearing, Wagner's case moves directly to trial, but Rossman said she and the District Attorney's Office are working to have Wagner enter a pretrial diversion program for first-time offenders.
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