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Temple University

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NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old Temple University student was shot in the neck near the North Broad Street campus early Sunday, and a suspect is in custody, police said. The student was shot about 3:30 a.m. in the 1900 block of North Gratz Street, Philadelphia police said. He was treated at Temple University Hospital and was expected to be released, university police said in a statement. Philadelphia police withheld the victim's name. A department spokeswoman could not provide the suspect's name or any charges.
SPORTS
May 12, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The people began forming a line at 4 p.m., an hour before the church doors swung open, and some were still there as late as 10:15, 75 minutes after the scheduled ending. That thousands, despite rainy, dreary weather, turned out last night at St. Alphonsus Church, in Maple Glen, Montgomery County, to honor C. Robert "Bob" Harrington was an occurrence that should have surprised no one. He meant that much to that many. Harrington, 55, who first made a name for himself as a basketball player and coach, and then enhanced it by becoming a giant in labor relations as a vice president for personnel services and chief negotiator at Temple University, all the while nurturing old friendships and starting new ones and caring for his beloved family, died last Thursday after battling cancer for close to four years.
SPORTS
March 28, 2012 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Due to an unsettled offseason, the Big East Conference has finally released its 2012 football schedule. The conference had to deal with the departure of West Virginia before luring a former member that it had booted years earlier - Temple. For now, the Owls will have an 11-game schedule - including seven Big East foes - this coming season, with two bye weeks. That could change, as Temple is still looking to add a 12th opponent. So far, the Owls' schedule that was released on Tuesday is highlighted with games against Villanova, Penn State, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Cincinnati.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has tapped current provost and long-time administrator Richard M. Englert to serve as acting president while the search for a permanent successor continues. Englert, also senior vice president for academic affairs, becomes acting president on July 1 upon the exit of current president Ann Weaver Hart, Temple Board President Patrick O'Connor said Wednesday morning. The university is in the middle of a national search to replace Hart, who has served as president for six years and will become president of the University of Arizona.
SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY has asked a Canadian high school to stop using an owl mascot that looks very much like its own. Temple officials said Thursday that the school in Kelowna, British Columbia, has agreed to change its symbol. The Kelowna Daily Courier reported that the local high school's scowling bird was virtually identical to Temple's Hooter the Owl. Kelowna Secondary School began using the symbol in 2002, after Temple had trademarked its image. It's not clear how the mascots ended up looking alike.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Indonesia N. Young of Camden packs up to go to Temple University next week, one of the treasures she'll take along is a photo album made by her mother. "This album is dedicated to all the ppl who didn't believe Our Dream," Ericka R. Young wrote to her daughter. "We was just trying to leave the Hood! You made it!" Like the classic Biggie Smalls song, "Juicy," which Ericka referenced, the photo album tells the story of a kid in poverty rising to success. Seeing her single mother struggle, Indonesia knew what she had to do: "I needed to go to college and graduate and get out of the ghetto in order to live the way I really wanted to live.
LIVING
March 6, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Classical music for babies. Foreign language tapes for toddlers. Today's parents are trying all sorts of things to stimulate their children in the hopes of maximizing brain power in the critical period right after birth. But do experiences in the early years - listening to Mozart or not - really determine how a child fares in the long run? In his 1999 book, The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning, child-education expert John Bruer debunks the popular notion that the most important period of brain development occurs before the age of 3. Bruer, who heads the James S. McDonnell Foundation in St. Louis, will join a panel of Philadelphia experts to discuss the "zero-to-three" theory at a symposium next Monday from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Temple University.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
LAWYERS MIGHT HAVE one of the most joked-about jobs on Earth, but here in Philadelphia, they now are among the most celebrated: Temple University yesterday officially opened a national Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame. The hall was founded in 2009 by the Trial Lawyer magazine, but hasn't had a physical home until now. Its goal: to honor trial lawyers "who have left an indelible mark on the American legal tradition through a lifetime of service to the American public, the Constitution and the American trial bar," according to its website.
NEWS
March 4, 2008
Working with Temple University officials, Philadelphia police took decisive action by charging four Temple students with the senseless beating of the grandson of a Holocaust survivor. The attackers reportedly shouted anti-Semitic slurs before pummeling the 23-year-old college student, a visitor to the North Broad Street campus who attends Penn State University. While the victim suffered a broken nose and orbital bone in his face, the hopeful news is that he is expected to recover fully, his father told a campus meeting on the attack late last week.
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DELORES M. Andy had two heroines. There was Goldie E. Watson, a legendary Philadelphia civil rights leader who ran the Model Cities Program and told Congress where to get off when it found her in contempt for not answering questions about Communism in the McCarthy-era Red scare. The other was Ida B. Wells, journalist, crusader for justice and women's rights firebrand of the 1920s. Goldie Watson, who died in 1994, had a direct influence on Delores Andy, leading her into civil rights causes, including the march to integrate Girard College in 1965.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 22, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple linebacker Tyler Matakevich enters his senior season with more career tackles (355) than any active college player. The closest pursuer, Mason Monheim of Illinois, is 61 tackles behind. Yet when Matakevich was a senior at St. Joseph's High School in Trumbull, Conn., he did as much hitting on the baseball diamond as he did on the football field. The 6-foot-1, 232-pound Matakevich was so proficient in baseball that even as late as his senior year in high school, he wasn't sure what sport to pursue.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Benjamin Franklin Aycox Jr., 77, of Philadelphia, a teacher and advocate of organized play as a tool for learning and social interaction, died Sunday, Aug. 16, of thyroid cancer at his home. A Philadelphian from birth, Mr. Aycox graduated from Simon Gratz High School in 1955. He was ranked among the top five students in his class. He earned a scholarship to Drexel University and became the only African American in the freshman class of 500. Two years later, he transferred to Temple University, and graduated with honors and a bachelor of science degree in science education.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
KAY DEMING didn't fit too well in the conservative atmosphere of Louisiana when she was growing up. She was just a bit too liberal for the South. But instead of moving north, she took off for Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, moved by the "winds of change," as her family put it. Kay spent two years in the Peace Corps in Barrio Simon Bolivar in Santo Domingo, where she taught English and helped open a neighborhood health clinic. Kay Deming Graham, as she became after marrying Jeffrey Graham in 1977, was a labor organizer whose emphasis was always on education and health care.
SPORTS
August 20, 2015 | By Susan Snyder and Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writers
Temple University and the Eagles have reached an agreement that would allow the Owls to play their home games in Lincoln Financial Field for two more years after their current rental contract expires in 2017. The amended agreement gives Temple the option to play in the 69,596-seat stadium in 2018 and 2019, the school said in a statement issued Tuesday. And the pact also gives the school the "flexibility and time" to explore all options, including the possibility of building a football stadium on campus - a proposition that could take several years, Temple officials said.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Indonesia N. Young of Camden packs up to go to Temple University next week, one of the treasures she'll take along is a photo album made by her mother. "This album is dedicated to all the ppl who didn't believe Our Dream," Ericka R. Young wrote to her daughter. "We was just trying to leave the Hood! You made it!" Like the classic Biggie Smalls song, "Juicy," which Ericka referenced, the photo album tells the story of a kid in poverty rising to success. Seeing her single mother struggle, Indonesia knew what she had to do: "I needed to go to college and graduate and get out of the ghetto in order to live the way I really wanted to live.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University said Thursday that it would add training, revise its student code of conduct, and take other steps to better handle sexual assaults on campus. The announcement by president Neil D. Theobald came nearly a year after he appointed a committee to study Temple's handling of sexual misconduct, and comes amid a backdrop of universities under scrutiny for their sexual-assault policies and procedures. The committee was formed after the U.S. Department of Education said Temple was among 55 colleges under investigation for their handling of sexual assaults and harassment on campus.
NEWS
August 12, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another major city institution has announced that it is temporarily halting operations when Pope Francis comes to town. Temple University's campuses in Philadelphia, Ambler, Center City, Fort Washington, and Harrisburg will close Sept. 25 for the World Meeting of Families, president Neil D. Theobald announced in an email Monday. Noting that "city officials are expecting more than 1.5 million people to attend the papal visit, and Mayor Nutter has projected this to be the largest event in Philadelphia's history," Theobald said that the call to close was made due to the anticipated impact on transportation across the region.
NEWS
August 12, 2015 | BY JENNIFER WRIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer wrightj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
STUDENTS AT SOME area universities will be saying "hallelujah" for an entirely different reason the weekend of the pope's visit. Temple University is the latest on a list of several colleges that will cancel classes in preparation for the expansive road restrictions in Center City beginning on Friday, Sept. 25. City officials announced on Wednesday plans to create a "traffic box" encompassing Center City and parts of West Philadelphia where private vehicles can exit, but not enter.
NEWS
August 11, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Temple University and its friends deserve congratulations for the on-schedule, on-budget start of restoration of the historic East Park Canoe House. The university took a long and difficult path to a graceful solution that will provide a fitting home for its rowing teams without encroaching on a well-used stretch of Fairmount Park. The university's teams were thrown out of the canoe house in 2008, when the city condemned it following years of neglect. At first, Temple considered building another, 23,000-square-foot boathouse in the area, near the Strawberry Mansion Bridge, which would have consumed precious parkland and made for a tight fit between Kelly Drive and the Schuylkill.
NEWS
August 6, 2015
ISSUE | WAGES Minimum rate hike not all it seems An increase in entry-level wages by more than 100 percent would ignore the serious unintended consequences for the economy and the employees it's intended to help ("$15-an-hour movement brings hope to city workers," July 29). Numerous nonpartisan organizations have found that mandated increases lead to negative employment impacts, including the Congressional Budget Office, which recently concluded that an increase to the oft-cited level of $10.10 would lead to a loss of approximately 500,000 jobs.
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