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Temple University

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NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Susan Snyder and Steve Bohnel, STAFF WRITERS
Temple University's board of trustees on Tuesday took a unanimous vote of no confidence in president Neil D. Theobald during a private session, and announced its intention to dismiss him. The board's action, announced by spokesman Kevin Feeley, came after a regularly scheduled meeting. News of the planned ouster came less than a month after Theobald removed provost Hai-Lung Dai from his post and blamed him for a $22 million shortfall in the university's merit scholarship program.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old Temple University student was shot in the neck near the North Broad Street campus early Sunday, and a suspect is in custody, police said. The student was shot about 3:30 a.m. in the 1900 block of North Gratz Street, Philadelphia police said. He was treated at Temple University Hospital and was expected to be released, university police said in a statement. Philadelphia police withheld the victim's name. A department spokeswoman could not provide the suspect's name or any charges.
SPORTS
May 12, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The people began forming a line at 4 p.m., an hour before the church doors swung open, and some were still there as late as 10:15, 75 minutes after the scheduled ending. That thousands, despite rainy, dreary weather, turned out last night at St. Alphonsus Church, in Maple Glen, Montgomery County, to honor C. Robert "Bob" Harrington was an occurrence that should have surprised no one. He meant that much to that many. Harrington, 55, who first made a name for himself as a basketball player and coach, and then enhanced it by becoming a giant in labor relations as a vice president for personnel services and chief negotiator at Temple University, all the while nurturing old friendships and starting new ones and caring for his beloved family, died last Thursday after battling cancer for close to four years.
SPORTS
March 28, 2012 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Due to an unsettled offseason, the Big East Conference has finally released its 2012 football schedule. The conference had to deal with the departure of West Virginia before luring a former member that it had booted years earlier - Temple. For now, the Owls will have an 11-game schedule - including seven Big East foes - this coming season, with two bye weeks. That could change, as Temple is still looking to add a 12th opponent. So far, the Owls' schedule that was released on Tuesday is highlighted with games against Villanova, Penn State, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Cincinnati.
NEWS
July 14, 2016
Temple University trustees unanimously approved a 2.8 percent increase in base tuition for undergraduate students at Tuesday's meeting. The board also approved eliminating upper-level tuition rates, which require upperclassmen to pay a higher rate than sophomores and freshmen. "After re-examining that policy, the board kind of pivoted and saw that as an obstacle for persistance and for kids to graduate in four years," said Ken Kaiser, Temple's chief financial officer. The board also approved an additional $250,000 to be spent studying the feasibility of a proposed football stadium on campus, bringing the total funding to $1.5 million.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has tapped current provost and long-time administrator Richard M. Englert to serve as acting president while the search for a permanent successor continues. Englert, also senior vice president for academic affairs, becomes acting president on July 1 upon the exit of current president Ann Weaver Hart, Temple Board President Patrick O'Connor said Wednesday morning. The university is in the middle of a national search to replace Hart, who has served as president for six years and will become president of the University of Arizona.
NEWS
May 17, 2016
ISSUE | PETER LIACOURAS Temple's redeemer The passing of former Temple University President Peter Liacouras marked the official end of an era ("Former Temple president Peter Liacouras dies," Philly.com, Friday). Liacouras saw his charter in a simple manner - to lead and manage Temple's transition - and this vision became a reality along Broad Street and in North Philadelphia. His years of work benefited Temple, the neighborhood, and the community, and as with Comcast cofounder Ralph Roberts, social activist the Rev. Leon Sullivan, and former Mayor Richardson Dilworth, his sense of uncompromising integrity raised the bar for all Philadelphians.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
POLICE NABBED one suspect and were looking for another in the robberies of two men near Temple University last week. Philadelphia police said Robert Sherrill, 26, of Clarion Street near York, and a 19-year-old accomplice - one of whom had a handgun - allegedly approached a 21-year-old former Temple football player about 12:35 a.m. Oct. 15 at 10th Street and Susquehanna Avenue. Police said the two men tried to force the victim into his car, but he refused. Sherrill and the accomplice allegedly forced the man to the ground, taking his keys, a cellphone and his 2005 Cadillac CTS and fled down Susquehanna.
SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY has asked a Canadian high school to stop using an owl mascot that looks very much like its own. Temple officials said Thursday that the school in Kelowna, British Columbia, has agreed to change its symbol. The Kelowna Daily Courier reported that the local high school's scowling bird was virtually identical to Temple's Hooter the Owl. Kelowna Secondary School began using the symbol in 2002, after Temple had trademarked its image. It's not clear how the mascots ended up looking alike.
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University on Tuesday announced the sudden departure of its provost, Hai-Lung Dai, saying he "has been relieved of his administrative responsibilities effective immediately. " The announcement came on the same day that the university acknowledged that it had exceeded its financial aid budget for its merit scholarship program for 2016-17 by $22 million and had already taken steps to balance the budget. Several sources with ties to the university said that president Neil D. Theobald was unhappy with the shortfall and that a rift had developed between him and Dai, who had been provost for four years.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
The lawyer whom embattled Temple University president Neil D. Theobald has hired as he tries to stave off his ouster by the university board has a long history of representing college presidents who need to negotiate exit deals once relationships have soured. Raymond D. Cotton, a Washington lawyer who works for the Boston-based Mintz Levin firm, is a nationally known expert on college presidential compensation. "Inside the industry, Ray is the 911 call you make when you're in trouble," said Shelly Weiss Storbeck, managing partner of Storbeck/Pimentel & Associates, an executive search firm in Media.
NEWS
July 19, 2016
Perhaps concerned that Penn State's status as a national monument to sports-inspired mass delusion was not completely secure, more than 200 former football players recently petitioned university officials to reerect a bronze likeness of tarnished coaching legend Joe Paterno outside Beaver Stadium, which was removed four years ago as a sexual-abuse scandal shook State College. Then, just a week after this latest attempt to rewrite Penn State's modern history, a Philadelphia judge unsealed reports that convicted child predator and longtime Paterno assistant Jerry Sandusky had sexually abused children there - and that Paterno and other coaches knew about it - as long ago as the Ford administration.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University in the last year drew record applications, scored a six-spot jump in U.S. News & World Report rankings, moved into the top 100 universities for research expenditures, had unprecedented fund-raising, and enjoyed its most spectacular football season in decades. The Owls were flying high. And yet, the 38,000-student university in the heart of North Philadelphia is facing one of the greatest leadership crises in its history. In the span of two weeks, its president fired its provost, and its board of trustees, in turn, took a vote of no confidence in the president and announced its intention to fire him. That means the university is poised to lose its two top leaders in high-profile ousters that are unusual in and of themselves, but coming at the same time, are even more extraordinary, experts say. "It's pretty unusual, especially that a board would intervene so quickly on the dismissal of a provost without talking extensively with the president, without a thorough investigation," said Joni Finney, director of the Institute for Research on Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Dr. Theodore Rodman didn't happen upon his patients only in the medical school and hospital at Temple University. "Once in a while," his former administrative assistant Kathy Clark Kelley said, "he liked to go around the corner from the hospital" for a roast beef sandwich. "More than once, he brought back a sickly guy," she said, "probably a ditch digger or construction worker. " The guy was "maybe wheezing, maybe coughing," and Dr. Rodman "provided him with the care that he needed, free of charge, no chart, no questions asked.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, STAFF WRITER
From the piers of the Hudson River in New York to the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, REV Theatre Company has been putting a novel spin on Shakespearean plays (and other classic works) for more than a decade. Next week, the company goes to Cape May to perform A Midsummer Night's Dream on the outdoor stage of the Emlen Physick Estate. The creation of co-artistic directors Rosemary Hay and Rudy Caporaso, REV is named for the litany of powerful words that begin with the letters R-E-V.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Two weeks after he was abruptly dismissed as provost of Temple University - and a day after school officials revealed that they were investigating a sexual harassment complaint against him - Hai-Lung Dai decried the allegations as "complete and utter fabrications. " "I will not rest or retreat until I have pursued every avenue available to me, including through a court of law, to restore my good name," Dai said in a statement Wednesday. On June 28, without explanation, Temple president Neil D. Theobald announced that he had removed Dai. On Tuesday, Temple's board said it intended to dismiss Theobald, blaming him for his handling of Dai's removal and a $22 million deficit in the school's financial aid budget for merit scholarships.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Susan Snyder and Steve Bohnel, STAFF WRITERS
The impending dismissal of Temple University president Neil D. Theobald had its roots in a growing conflict with members of the board of trustees who faulted him for failing to consult them on key issues and mishandling others, according to people familiar with the board's decision-making. The rift began in March, when a $22 million shortfall was projected in the university's financial-aid budget for merit scholarships, several sources said. It intensified last month, they said, when Theobald removed provost Hai-Lung Dai and announced his replacement without consulting the board.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Susan Snyder and Steve Bohnel, STAFF WRITERS
Temple University's board of trustees on Tuesday took a unanimous vote of no confidence in president Neil D. Theobald during a private session, and announced its intention to dismiss him. The board's action, announced by spokesman Kevin Feeley, came after a regularly scheduled meeting. News of the planned ouster came less than a month after Theobald removed provost Hai-Lung Dai from his post and blamed him for a $22 million shortfall in the university's merit scholarship program.
NEWS
July 14, 2016
Temple University trustees unanimously approved a 2.8 percent increase in base tuition for undergraduate students at Tuesday's meeting. The board also approved eliminating upper-level tuition rates, which require upperclassmen to pay a higher rate than sophomores and freshmen. "After re-examining that policy, the board kind of pivoted and saw that as an obstacle for persistance and for kids to graduate in four years," said Ken Kaiser, Temple's chief financial officer. The board also approved an additional $250,000 to be spent studying the feasibility of a proposed football stadium on campus, bringing the total funding to $1.5 million.
SPORTS
July 9, 2016 | By Elliott Denman, For The Inquirer
EUGENE, Ore. - Marielle Hall has already made American track and field history. Now she's doubling down on her Olympic ambitions. Hall is bound for Rio de Janeiro after her third-place finish Saturday in the 10,000-meter final at the U.S. Olympic trials. The Haddonfield High and University of Texas alumna now has set her sights on the 5,000 meters. She finished in 31 minutes, 54.77 seconds behind Molly Huddle and Emily Infeld on Saturday at Hayward Field. Hall will be the first African American runner to represent the United States in the Olympic 10,000, "and that's very meaningful to me," she said.
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