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Temple University

NEWS
December 9, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Cosby has lost another honor. Swarthmore College's board of managers voted Saturday to rescind an honorary degree in humane letters that the college awarded to the entertainer in 1995. College President Valerie Smith announced the decision Monday. "Mr. Cosby has testified in a deposition under oath, which was made public in July, that he routinely and premeditatively drugged women before having sex with them," wrote Smith, who became president this year of Swarthmore, one of the nation's highly selective colleges.
NEWS
December 5, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allen Harberg, 81, of Philadelphia, a real estate developer and entrepreneur who championed the cause of underserved neighborhoods, died Tuesday, Dec. 1, of heart failure at Chestnut Hill Hospital. A graduate of the Haverford School and Washington and Lee University, Mr. Harberg was "an entrepreneur in the truest sense of the word," his family said. As a young man, he struck out on his own, developing the Philadelphia Marine Center, the Gateway Care Center, and a joint venture between Delaware County Memorial Hospital and Presbyterian-University of Pennsylvania Hospital to build nursing homes in Wayne, Havertown, and Paoli.
SPORTS
December 4, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
MOST EVERY success story has a genesis. For Temple's football team, especially the senior core, it's not hard to identify. Two years ago, the Owls and first-year coach Matt Rhule lost at home to FCS Fordham by a point on a 29-yard touchdown pass with four seconds left to drop to 0-3 on the way to a 2-10 finish. That came after they'd lost five of their final six the year before to finish 4-7. Fordham hadn't beaten an FBS team since the program was restored in 1970. "That was the worst," said senior linebacker Tyler Matakevich, who will help lead the 20th-ranked Owls (10-2)
SPORTS
December 4, 2015 | BY MICHAEL GUISE, Daily News Staff Writer MGuise@phillynews.com
IN THE MIDDLE of the Raymond Rosen housing project lay a field of grass that Dawn Staley frequented when she was a child. Staley, who grew up on Glenwood Avenue, or the "Fourth block," played basketball, football and baseball while surrounded by the tall buildings of the now-demolished project. Along with the field and the Moreland Center on 25th and Diamond streets, which was later renamed the Hank Gathers Recreation Center, Staley had an outlet from the distractions that surrounded her while growing up in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 2, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
IT WAS A BIZARRE CASE, to say the least. In June 2014, a son of abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell broke into a house near his family's Mantua home, stole an Xbox console and other electronics from the young men living inside, then returned a second time and ended up slashing one of the victims inside the house with a bayonet. Barron Alexander was then shot four times by another victim in the house, who had a license to carry a gun. Alexander had legally changed his name in 2012 from Barron Alexander Gosnell to Barron Alexander.
NEWS
December 2, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
He went so far as to legally change his name to escape the international notoriety of his father, the West Philadelphia abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell. What Barron Alexander could not change was the pressure of striving to do well in college as the son of a man dubbed a "monster" in charge of a "house of horrors. " On Monday, a Philadelphia judge accepted the assessment of Alexander's lawyer - a mental breakdown - and freed Alexander to begin eight years of probation for a June 2014 burglary of a house two doors from his mother's in the Mantua section of West Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 2, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT PROBABLY wasn't too cool an idea to walk through certain sections of Southwest Philadelphia carrying a black doctor's bag. But Dr. Bill Sembrot did it without fear. "He was a small, country doctor in a big city," said his son, David J. Sembrot. "He made house calls. Colleagues would say, 'Doc, what are doing? People will think there are drugs in that bag.' But he never had a problem. He was never afraid. " William B. Sembrot, retired private practice physician who worked for several city health clinics, an Army doctor assigned to a MASH surgical unit in Korea, a passionate Civil War buff and devoted Temple University basketball fan, died Nov. 25 of heart failure.
NEWS
November 27, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University's 1,400 adjunct professors will become part of the faculty union, after more than two-thirds of those voting approved the proposal. The tally - 609-266 - came after years of efforts to unionize the adjunct faculty. The Temple Association of University Professionals will double in size as a result of the vote, whose results were released by both the university and the union. Adjunct faculty become union members immediately but their work terms will have to be negotiated, and the vote has to be officially certified by the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board, said Art Hochner, president of the union and a professor in the Fox School of Business.
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Hopkins Foell, 103, of North Hills, a quality control inspector for a steel company, died Thursday, Nov. 12, of congestive heart failure. Mr. Foell died at home after a lengthy decline. On his last night, he slept while his family watched Jeopardy! "It was one of his favorite shows. And until just a few weeks before he died, he knew most of the answers," his family said in a tribute. Mr. Foell was born in 1912, two weeks before the Titanic sank in the North Atlantic on its maiden voyage and two years before the outbreak of World War I. Tales of Mr. Foell's long life fascinated his family.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Surely there are not many people who can say that they have contributed to the fight against cancer and to the art of fingerprint forensics. Throw in expertise with a fungus used to make Roquefort cheese, and almost certainly the number goes down to one: University of Pennsylvania chemistry professor Madeleine M. JoulliƩ. She is among the two winners of this year's John Scott award, a science prize given by the City of Philadelphia since 1822. The other winner is Temple University physics professor John P. Perdew, who developed a widely used computational method for predicting the properties of new materials.
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