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Temple University

NEWS
August 14, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AS AN EDUCATOR for five decades, Anna Young always took special interest in the often-unmet needs of urban students. In fact, the longtime English teacher wrote a book on the subject, Relationship of Writing and Self-Esteem Among Urban High School Students , in which she discussed how proficiency in self-expression could help city kids feel better about themselves and their place in the world. Far ahead of her time, Anna Young actually was one of the first African-American teachers in the Philadelphia School District when she began her career in the 1940s.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
IN YET ANOTHER blow to Temple University's African American Studies Department, another professor, Iyelli Ichile, has suddenly resigned - three weeks before the start of the new school year. Ichile, who taught African-American studies and served as the undergraduate chairwoman, resigned Monday, citing family reasons, according to department chairman Molefi Asante. Classes at Temple are set to begin Aug. 25. The department was the target of protests last spring over the firing of professor Anthony Monteiro.
NEWS
August 6, 2014
KUDOS to Temple University for its commitment to access and diversity and its bold and courageous move to make the SAT or ACT an option and not a requirement for admission to the university beginning fall 2015. Temple becomes the first national public research university in the Northeast to make standardized test scores optional. In looking at the whole picture and a student's entire high-school body of work - GPA, class rank, rigorous subject choices, overall achievement - and recognizing that there do exist intelligent and outstanding students who may not standardized-test well, Temple is helping to ensure that many more deserving students with the potential to make an impact on the university and on the world do not fall through the cracks and are now given the opportunity to attend Temple.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former director of the University of Pennsylvania's campus fitness center waived a preliminary hearing Monday on charges that she stole cash and items from the center's lost and found. Amy M. Wagner, 45, who was fired by the university in May, briefly appeared with lawyer Mariana Rossman before Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Nazario Jimenez Jr. With the waiver of a preliminary hearing, Wagner's case moves directly to trial, but Rossman said she and the District Attorney's Office are working to have Wagner enter a pretrial diversion program for first-time offenders.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School District has asked the state Supreme Court to swiftly reject a lawsuit that aims to block the sale of William Penn High School to Temple University. The cash-strapped schools desperately need the $15 million from the sale of the North Philadelphia property, according to court documents the district filed last week. The district's deficit - which already stands at $81 million - would grow by $11 million without the net proceeds from the sale. "Any delay in closing the sale and receiving these funds will harm the School District greatly," the district said in a court filing that asks the justices to act on the matter "as soon as reasonably possible.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As the Gaza conflict drags on, Iraq has faded from the headlines, even though the country is falling to pieces. So it was intriguing to meet a terrific group of Iraqi college students at Temple University on a State Department exchange program that introduces them to religious pluralism in America. Needless to say, I wondered whether they could apply these lessons in Iraq. The impressive five-week program run by Temple's Dialogue Institute exposed the five Iraqis - along with Lebanese, Turkish, and Egyptian peers - to a dizzying variety of religions as well as the U.S. protections for religious freedom.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Smith called his life a "nightmare that just won't seem to quit," and it's likely no one in the courtroom disagreed. Smith's mental and emotional problems began when he was raped by an older cousin at age 6. Later, in an adult relationship, he learned that his partner had been molesting children and had given him HIV. There was an older half-brother who killed himself, and a friend who was murdered. His problems continued Wednesday when a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge sentenced him to four to eight years in prison for a one-day crime spree in which he mugged and robbed a 76-year-old man and a Temple University student.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an effort to cultivate talented students who don't test well, Temple University says it will become the first national public research university in the Northeast to make standardized test scores optional for admission. The university expects as many as 150 to 200 students who likely would not have been accepted because of low SAT and ACT scores, but who exhibit other promising attributes, will be admitted for fall 2015. Many of them could come from the Philadelphia School District.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bursting with anger at the growing death toll in the Gaza Strip, 300 pro-Palestinian demonstrators hurled invective through bullhorns Friday outside the Center City office tower that houses the Israeli consulate in Philadelphia. "Israel, Israel, what do you say?" they chanted. "How many kids have you killed today?" For nearly three weeks, Hamas militants in Gaza have rained incessant rocket fire on Israel, and the Israel Defense Forces have bombed Gaza and invaded the coastal strip.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE AMERICAN Civil Liberties Union and others yesterday filed a federal lawsuit against the city and two cops on behalf of a Temple University student who they say was unlawfully arrested last year when he photographed a group of cops gathered outside a North Philly house. The complaint follows previous cases in which cops allegedly assaulted or arrested other civilians who tried to film police actions in public and a September 2011 memorandum by Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey that instructed officers to allow themselves to be recorded.
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