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Temple University

NEWS
December 2, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the 15,400 artifacts Temple University archaeology students unearthed at Timbuctoo - a buried village of freed and runaway slaves along Rancocas Creek - was a tiny, cast-iron buffalo. "There was also a little gun and a wagon wheel, all of which might have been part of a bank set" for a child to collect coins, said Patricia Markert, a Temple student who helped manage the school's field project in 2010 and 2011 and then conducted several smaller digs last year. The final batch of artifacts - including tiny pieces of glass from bottles found up to two feet below the surface - are being washed, analyzed, and catalogued, Markert said while photographing the historical site in Westampton Township, Burlington County, last week as part of her study.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Vernon Clark, and Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Several hundred demonstrators flooded a central Philadelphia thoroughfare at evening rush hour Tuesday and snaked through city streets for several hours in protest of a Missouri grand jury's decision not to indict a white police officer for shooting to death an unarmed black man. Marchers filed up four-lane North Broad Street from City Hall, stopped at Temple University, then headed to the Ninth District police station in Franklintown, capping a...
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA and JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writers vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
HUNDREDS OF people flooded Philadelphia's streets yesterday, weaving through tumbledown blocks of North Philly to share a unified message: Things need to change. For the second consecutive day, local protesters - residents, Temple University students and spiritual leaders - rallied to decry the grand jury's decision Monday to not indict Darren Wilson, the Ferguson, Mo., police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown. But the fervor in Philly wasn't just reserved for Ferguson: The demonstrators had a long list of demands, including body cameras for city police officers, freedom for Mumia Abu-Jamal and the release of two of their own. "It's incredible, I didn't expect to have so many positive vibes," Naveed Ahsan said last night after he was arraigned on a disorderly conduct charge at the Central Detective Division, on 21st Street near Hamilton in Spring Garden.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
LINCOLN UNIVERSITY president Robert Jennings resigned yesterday amid criticism over comments he made about sexual assault earlier this semester. The university announced Jennings' departure in a statement from board of trustees chairwoman Kimberly Lloyd. A university spokeswoman said the resignation is immediate, but she would not provide a reason. Valerie Harrison, the school's general counsel, will serve as acting president while the trustees look for a long-term replacement.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there It was the first day of playwriting class, spring semester 2005, at Temple University. Caitlin, who grew up in Olney and Abington, commuted to Temple from her Cheltenham apartment, and the university shuttle got her there early. She opened Persepolis . Christian, who grew up in Broomall, had barely rolled out of bed in his nearby dorm when he saw the unusual sight of a student passing time not with phone or headphones, but with a book. And she was beautiful. Wishing he had taken a minute to do something about his hair, Christian walked over.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Wilbert Hilliard McCabe, 72, of Yeadon, a longtime music scholar and teacher in the Philadelphia public schools, died Thursday, Nov. 13, of cardiac amyloidosis at his home. A child prodigy reared in South and then West Philadelphia, Dr. McCabe had memorized the city's major streets by age 6, began to study piano at age 3, and at 6 appeared in a musical program with the singer and actor Paul Robeson, his family said. His uncle Charles A. McCabe, a violinist and trailblazer for musicians of color, was the young Dr. McCabe's role model.
NEWS
November 22, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chief U.S. Circuit Judge Theodore A. McKee couldn't stop thinking about it this morning: mounting rape allegations against Bill Cosby, who, like McKee, sits on Temple University's board of trustees. As a state-related university - currently under investigation by the federal education department for its handling of sexual assault and harassment cases - what stance should Temple take in regards to Cosby, a longtime trustee and fixture on the North Philadelphia campus? "It's one thing to say it's a public university and we have an obligation to maintain an appearance that does not undermine the seriousness of the charges," said McKee, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter has nominated JoAnne A. Epps, dean of the Beasley School of Law at Temple University, to serve on the city's Board of Ethics. If, as expected, Epps is confirmed Thursday by City Council, the five-member board would officially be composed of lawyers. Epps would replace the Rev. C. Kevin Gillespie, whose five-year term ends this month. Her nomination was a complete surprise, she said Wednesday. She would join the board at a busy time, as it is likely to have some oversight of and opinions about next year's elections, including the races for mayor, City Council, and city commissioner.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WILBERT McCABE memorized all the major streets of Philadelphia at age 6, took his first piano lessons at age 3 and performed with Paul Robeson at age 6. By 14, he was playing Grieg's Piano Concerto in a Philadelphia church. It was no wonder this brilliant child prodigy, musician and teacher had no problem remembering the birthdays of children, nieces and nephews, siblings, in-laws and friends. And the fact that every year he would send out 700 Christmas cards worldwide is not much of a surprise.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The "a-ha moment" for Gabriel Tatarian came at a party when, light-headed, he passed out. When he regained consciousness, son Gabriel T. said, Dr. Tatarian determined to get himself into shape. After the episode, "he was a pretty avid runner, from age 50 to 88," his son said. "He was running five miles a day for 15 years, to 65. " And that was despite a demanding day job. On Monday, Nov. 17, Dr. Tatarian, 91, of Moorestown, from 1961 to 1988 the co-chief of obstetrics and gynecology at the Rancocas Valley division of the former Zurbrugg Memorial Hospital, died at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
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