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Temple University

NEWS
June 22, 2014 | BY DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writer segelbd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5917
AS A TURRET gunner on a B-24 bomber during World War II, Joe Kiernan flew 35 combat missions, many aimed at taking out German aircraft and the country's wartime industry. He was "shot up a bit," but made it home safely. And in 1946, thanks to the federal government, Kiernan was able to enroll at St. Joseph's University for free - an experience he said would shape his life. "There is no way in my own life I would've been able to get to college in the prewar world," said Kiernan, 88, who grew up in Logan.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham and Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writers
The former William Penn High School, a sprawling structure on North Broad Street, was permanently closed by the School Reform Commission on Thursday night and sold to Temple University for $15 million. Part of the property will be razed and turned into athletic fields and recreation space for Temple students. The school building fronting Broad Street will remain, and will house a job-training academy run by the Laborers' District Council Education and Training/Apprenticeship Fund.
NEWS
June 18, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Madeleine Marie Sautter, 87, former principal of Merion Mercy Academy and Archbishop Prendergast High School, died Thursday, June 12, of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at McAuley Convent in Merion. Sister Madeleine was principal of Merion Mercy Academy from 1972 to 1980. During that time, the academy grew in enrollment, and classrooms were added. "She was an outstanding woman of faith and kindness, whose door was always open to the faculty. She was never too busy to take time to talk about professional or personal matters with us," Marguerite Russo Mitchell, a fellow faculty member from 1972 to 1977, wrote in an online condolence book.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Antoinette M. Schiavo, 82, of Haddonfield, who retired in 2013 as associate dean of the School of Education at Holy Family University, died of complications of cancer Monday, May 19, at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse in Center City. Earlier in her academic career, Miss Schiavo was an administrator at Immaculata College and Temple University. Sister Francesca Onley, president of Holy Family, said in a statement that "Dr. Schiavo was a beloved member of our campus community. " Dr. Schiavo began her career there in 1991.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
College is supposed to be a place to open one's mind to new ideas, but too often it has become a place to begin abusing prescription drugs - assuming that wasn't first tried in high school. "Colleges get a new crop of eager high school graduates each year," U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger said in his opening remarks to a gathering Wednesday at Temple University. "Unfortunately, one of the lessons these students failed to learn in high school is the risks with prescription drugs, and that can play itself out on campuses throughout the country.
NEWS
June 11, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
FRIEDA TAYLOR, a native of Gujarat state in northwest India, travels from her home in Philadelphia's Spring Garden section to Bensalem to go food shopping. She likes the new Apna Bazar Cash & Carry supermarket on Street Road, where she can buy ingredients to make roti bread and other Indian fare. Apna "has different variety and they're more fresh," she said as she browsed the aisles with her son Elliott, 5. "I need some tea and chapati flour," she said. She also picked up basmati rice and chocolate cookies.
NEWS
June 10, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University is investigating an ethics complaint that two of its professors did not properly disclose funding from the private prison industry for their research on the cost of incarceration. Simon Hakim and Erwin Blackstone, economists on Temple's faculty since the mid-1970s, argued that they had been doing similar research for decades and always disclosed their funding when their work was completed. They said sometimes their research favors the funder and sometimes it does not. In this case, it did. The professors concluded that private prisons save money while performing as well as or better than government-operated prisons and generate much-needed competition.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
The headline on a Saturday story about Temple University shutting down AxisPhilly, a news site, incorrectly stated the reason behind the decision. Temple did not seek additional funding and instead decided to pursue a different strategy.
NEWS
June 8, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University is shutting down AxisPhilly, the nonprofit public-service news website that investigates and reports on civic issues in the city, the university announced Friday. The website, administered by the Center for Public Interest Journalism at Temple, was started in 2012 with a grant of about $2.4 million from the William Penn Foundation, which has indicated it would not renew funding, said David Boardman, dean of Temple's School of Media and Communication. "We needed to do something," said Boardman, who added that the site was nearly out of money.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
ANOTHER GOSNELL is accused of terrorizing West Philadelphia. Baron Alexander, a/k/a Baron Gosnell, the son of disgraced abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell, faces charges of burglary, robbery, receiving stolen property and related offenses after allegedly breaking into a house not far from his own on Brandywine Street near 37th early yesterday, said Lt. John Walker of Southwest Detectives. Alexander, 22, was recovering last night at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, after one of the college students he allegedly victimized opened fire on him with a gun he was licensed to carry, Walker said.
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