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FOOD
June 28, 2000 | by Steve Esack, Daily News Staff Writer
David Surro, owner of Tequila's at 1511 Locust St., answers some questions about his restaurant's namesake spirit. Where does tequila come from? Tequila comes from the juice of the blue agave plant, which is only grown in the Mexican state of Jalisco and a few small municipalities outside Jalisco. What is agave and how long does it take to grow? Agave is often referred to as a cactus, but it is actually part of the lily family. It takes an average of eight to 12 years for an agave to grow and be harvested correctly.
NEWS
December 18, 1987 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Plop plop, fizz fizz, oh, what a relief it is. No, I'm not talking about that famous remedy for dyspepsia brought on by leaden burritos and Cheese Whizzed nachos. I'm just gladdened by the fact that we finally have a Mexican restaurant with more going for it than copious portions and cheap prices and where you are not acutely reminded of last night's dinner the morning after. Tequila's occupies the former space of El Metate at 15th and Locust streets. The current tenants have transformed the restaurant into a much warmer and more convivial spot, like a south-of-the-border casa hosting a fiesta.
FOOD
December 9, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Fifty-eight varieties of tequila fill the shelves at the bar at Kokopelli (1904 Chestnut St., 215-557-7510), a new, high-energy, Southwestern, small-plate operation named after the American Indian fertility god. Aside from the polished wood tables, not much has been done to the dining room from its previous incarnation as the lounge-y Akoya @ Pearl. Beaded curtains separate the tables along the walls, and the bar and seating are bathed in lights that change color. Chef Gina Rodriguez, an Arizona import, is cooking such dishes as tamales, garlic chili-glazed prawns, baby-back ribs, and crispy quail with cayenne honey.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
For lovers of Mexican food, Center City now has Tequila's, which bills itself as an "authentic Mexican restaurant and bar. " It's not unusual for south-of-the-border-style places to describe themselves with overstatement, but in the case of Tequila's, it doesn't seem to be idle boasting. Tequila's gets to the heart of Mexican food with some classic Mayan dishes, such as the fish fillet ($14) wrapped in banana leaves with oysters, shrimp, onions and tomato for baking partners.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1992 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
David Suro, owner of Tequila's in Center City, says it's difficult for him to make menu changes. "My regular customers will not let me do it. 'Keep doing that dish,' they say. Or, if I make a change, 'Why don't you have this dish anymore?' . " So Suro has been featuring a lot of nightly specials. Sometimes as many as 10. This way, he can introduce interesting new tastes and keep the traditional dishes. Something like having your nachitos and eating them, too. Tequila's is going on seven years old. When it first opened, it showed diners that Mexican food was a serious cuisine that had evolved over centuries.
NEWS
March 27, 1998 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Want to make Ozzie Jones really, really happy? Take him to Tequila's. The associate artistic director of Venture Theater, Jones was like a kid in a candy store - and a rather ravenous kid at that - when he accepted our invitation to break away from a heavy-duty rehearsal schedule and chat and chew at his favorite restaurant in all of Philadelphia. Upon entering, owner David Suro greeted Jones with welcoming smile and a hearty "Where have you been?" - which is no surprise since Jones and Tequila's fine authentic Mexican cuisine go waaay back.
NEWS
October 31, 1998 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Their arms full, the ninth graders in this University City High School class streamed into the library yesterday morning and began decorating the cloth-covered tables. For Langston Hughes, lover of board games and jazz, they laid down a Ouija table and a boom box. For Edgar Allan Poe, a man who liked his drink, they offered a bottle of tequila donning a miniature white and blue sombrero and Mexican scarf. Bram Stoker got a small black plastic box - a makeshift coffin - decorated with cutout paper footballs, signifying the Dracula author's interest in that sport.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1998 | By Jon Caroulis, FOR THE INQUIRER
During the Christmas holidays of 1948, Margaret Sames of San Antonio was hosting a party for family and friends in Acapulco. Among her guests were Nicky Hilton, playboy son of the hotel chain's owner (and Elizabeth Taylor's first husband), and other socialites. Her favorite drink was Cointreau and, hoping to add some pizzazz to the evening, she mixed in tequila and lime juice. In the Mexican tradition of drinking tequila, she rimmed the glasses with salt and served it. The party went on for two weeks.
NEWS
September 14, 1993 | BY DAVE BARRY
There are times when, as a taxpayer, I just have to put my head between my legs and weep with joy at the benefits I am receiving from the federal government ("Official Motto: This Motto Alone Cost $13.2 Billion"). You'll feel the same way when I share some news items sent in by alert readers concerning government agencies servicing the public in ways that the public could never have thought of itself without the aid of powerful narcotics. (As is often the case when discussing the government, I need to stress that I am not making any of these items up.)
NEWS
November 3, 1999 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Four freshmen at Rutgers University's New Brunswick campus were charged with spiking a fellow student's drink with sleeping pills Friday night, campus police said yesterday. Charged with reckless endangerment were Jason Rinehart of Cherry Hill; Christian Kolarsick of Fair Haven; Michael Pasinkoff of Bayside, N.Y.; and Jordan Peterson of Garden City, N.Y. All are 18. The victim, an 18-year-old freshman living in their dormitory, suffered only light-headedness, police said. They would not release his name.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, RESTAURANT CRITIC
For most of the 30 years since David Suro-Piñera opened Tequila's, his elegant ode to authentic Mexican cuisine and drink on Locust Street, he's only had eyes for one kind of agave spirit: tequila. That's no surprise, considering the restaurant's name, his epic bottle collection, and Siembra Azul, the company featuring highlands tequila he launched 11 years ago. But with Siembra's recent expansion into the world of mescal, plus a new line of tequilas featuring lowlands terroir (Siembra Valles)
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
Much like the tequilas from Siembra Azul, the new line of Siembra Metl mezcals just introduced by David Suro-Piñera's locally based spirits company speak to his love of unique terroir and ancient Mexican artisan techniques. The rapidly growing category of mezcal - a wider family of agave spirits from which tequila sprang - tends to be more rustic and idiosyncratic than the now highly commericalized tequila field. But these bottles from master mescalero Jose Emilio Vieyra Rangel in Michoacán show a little more finesse than some of the campfire-pungent Oaxacan mezcals that first charmed the American market.
FOOD
April 8, 2016
David Suro-Piñera has seen regulars at Tequila's who, for 30 years, have ordered the same thing each time they come to his elegant Locust Street restaurant. That explains why the tortilla soup, mole poblano, and cochinita pibil are still among the authentic classics that anchor the menu. But if you graze some of chef Claudio Soto's creative specials, you'll discover Tequila's kitchen has been evolving, too, keeping pace with the contemporary ideas that have appeared in some of Philly's more recent Nuevo Mex entrees.
FOOD
April 8, 2016
Guess from these photos where restaurant critic Craig LaBan ate this week. (Answers below.) 1. "Kaninchen Bandnudeln" beer-braised rabbit over ribbon noodles with gremolata 2. Chapulines grasshopper mini-tacos with pipian 3. Iberico pork Wellington For a fresh serving of Craig's Crumb Tracker quiz, join him 2 p.m. Tuesdays on his online chat: inquirer.com/ labanchats Answers: 1. Brauhaus Schmitz (718 South St.)...
FOOD
November 6, 2015
Maybe this year's load of Paleo-titled cookbooks is too close to my desk, but when I saw this recipe in The New Cast-Iron Cookbook , I thought it could be served without its accompanying pasta, making it almost paleo, save for the butter. (A "paleo" diet is free of processed foods, grains, and dairy.) Shrimp and Avocado in Tequila-Tomato Sauce 4 servings   3 tablespoons cold unsalted butter 1 medium bulb fennel 11/4 pounds peeled and deveined large shrimp 1/2 cup tequila 2 ripe avocados One 28-ounce can no-salt-added whole tomatoes, preferably fire-roasted 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1/2 bunch cilantro 2 limes   1. Melt half of the butter in a large skillet over medium heat.
FOOD
October 16, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: It's worth talking about Michael Matza's front-page story this week about Barbacoa chef Benjamin Miller's quest to force a public dialogue in the local restaurant industry about the plight of undocumented Mexican workers here - including his wife and co-chef, Cristina Martinez. Tequila's owner, David Suro, estimates 1,500 Mexican immigrants work in local kitchens. But where would our restaurant scene be without them?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
IT'S A crisp autumn night, you're at a house party with some friends, and everyone's getting thirsty. There's good music, good food, good people - heck, maybe a couple of wild and crazy guys are making a scene on the dance floor - but the only thing you can find to drink is unrelentingly bad liquor. Who you gonna call? Dan Aykroyd. The Hollywood icon feels your pain, consumer of bad booze. He had some unfortunate encounters in the past with the perfectly awful tequila and vodka sold near his summer home in Canada.
FOOD
July 5, 2013
Mix-master mozzarella Fresh-made mozzarella has become common in its many variations, from simple balls to prosciutto roll-ups and cream-stuffed burratas. But Vietnamese-flavored mozzarella? This wacky but wonderful invention, tinted pink with sriracha and rich with sesame oil, is courtesy of Mike Hauke of Tony Boloney's in Atlantic City. He's stretched the craft into unconventional new-flavor territory by infusing his homemade curds (a base ingredient many local makers buy) with everything from truffles to chipotles and this Asian inspiration.
NEWS
June 16, 2013
The Paloma too often gets overshadowed by big sister Margarita - at least, north of the Rio Grande. But in Mexico, it seems, Paloma reigns as the tequila drink queen, in large part because this quenching grapefruit cocktail better harmonizes with the tequila. Recipes for this highball drink vary from basic - one-part tequila, half-a-lime squeezed, three parts grapefruit soda (Jarritos or Squirt) - to more natural variations with fresh-squeezed grapefruit and lime juices, plus club soda and agave syrup.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013
  BUZZ:   Hey Marnie, how come tequila is so expensive? I thought that stuff was rotgut. Marnie: No, Buzz. Premium tequilas are considered to be some of the finest spirits in the world, and their prices reflect supply and demand. There are bargain brands, of course, but the best are truly exceptional. Buzz: Really? I swore off tequila in the '70s - the worm in the bottle freaked me out. Marnie: You'll never find a worm in tequila - you're thinking of mezcal.
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