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Terminal Illness

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2011
DEAR ABBY: We have been friends with "The Bickersons" for quite some time. They never have a kind word to say to each other. Mr. B. now has a terminal illness, and you would think they'd be kinder to each other at a time like this. On the contrary, their fights are more groundless and vicious than ever. It is becoming increasingly difficult to be around them. This is when they need friends more than ever, but they're driving everyone away! What can we do? - Love Is All We Need DEAR LOVE: Although you might imagine that when a spouse has a terminal illness it would bring the couple closer together, that is not always the case.
NEWS
July 14, 2007 | By Samuel Dangremond and Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
An elderly couple were found dead in their Voorhees home yesterday in what the Camden County Prosecutor's Office called a murder-suicide. The preliminary investigation indicated Robert Donald Bryson, 90, shot his wife Ruth, 85, in the chest and then shot himself in the abdomen. A .32-caliber revolver was recovered. Ruth Bryson was terminally ill, according to investigators. Voorhees Deputy Police Chief John Prettyman said there had been plans to have her go into a hospice program.
LIVING
April 6, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Shirley Scott sleeps, which is often these days, she dreams. Music, especially the bop-based jazz-blues she has traveled the world performing, is the soundtrack to those dreams. When Shirley Scott sleeps, she dreams of happy times, times in which she played her Hammond B-3 in organ trios and larger ensembles with some of the greatest musicians on earth. She dreams of the wonderful times she has had with her three daughters and two sons, of laughs and smiles shared with her large coterie of friends.
NEWS
June 12, 1995 | For The Inquirer / SCOTT S. HAMRICK
At a family fun day for children with serious or terminal illness and their families, Max Mitchell (left) and John Cepus (center) cover Mathew Billings with sand. Mathew has a brain tumor. The Make a Wish Foundation event was Saturday at Camp America in Chalfont.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | By Gregory Spears, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Social Security Administration has agreed to expedite disability claims made by people with terminal illnesses after a case in which an AIDS patient waited 25 months for his first benefits check but died before it came. Under the new policy - sent to all 1,300 Social Security field offices Jan. 31 but not announced publicly - people claiming a terminal illness will be moved to the front of the line for hearings and appeals, Social Security spokesman Phil Gambino said yesterday.
NEWS
February 6, 2012
NEW YORK - Ben Gazzara, whose powerful dramatic performances brought an intensity to a variety of roles and made him a memorable presence in such iconic productions over the decades as the original "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" on Broadway and the film "The Big Lebowski," died on Friday. He was 81. In 1955, he originated the role on Broadway of Brick Pollitt, the disturbed alcoholic son and failed football star in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. " In 1965, he moved on to TV stardom in "Run for Your Life," a drama about a workaholic lawyer who, diagnosed with a terminal illness, quits his job and embarks on a globe-trotting attempt to squeeze a lifetime of adventures into the time he has left.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
A Seaford, Del., woman apparently fatally shot her husband and elderly mother before turning the gun on herself Wednesday afternoon, Delaware State Police said. Police recovered the bodies of Beverly L. Lloyd, 62; her husband, Walter A. Lloyd, 65, and her mother, Lillie H. Jarrell, 81, from their home about 4:15 p.m., said Cpl. Gerald R. Pepper Jr., state police spokesman. Beverly Lloyd was shot in the chest. Jarrell and Walter Lloyd each had a gunshot wound in the head. Beverly Lloyd apparently was despondent over repeated arguments with her husband and over her mother's terminal illness, Pepper said.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
WHEN Attorney General Kathleen Kane declined to defend the state's anti-gay marriage statute last year, it seemed she could be the political messiah who'd drag Pennsylvania into the realm of progress - especially if she ran, as anticipated, for governor. That impression was shattered the following month, when she inexplicably prosecuted a dutiful, loving daughter for allegedly assisting her father's suicide. Kane lost the case this week against Philadelphia nurse Barbara Mancini, which was thrown out by Schuylkill County Judge Jacqueline Russell.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A chastely erotic teen film in which the high school rebel is rehabbed by the preacher's daughter, A Walk to Remember is an idealistic love story that brings out the latent 15-year-old romantic in everyone. The movie stars Shane West, the moody heartbreaker best known for his role on television's Once and Again, and Mandy Moore, the PG-rated pop singer, a Barbie blonde who plays a subdued brunette here. At a school where the microclimates of hot and not are more clearly defined than the pressure systems in John Hughes movies, Landon (West)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2003 | By MARIKO THOMPSON Los Angeles Daily News
Maria Housden experienced total heartbreak - the diagnosis of her child's terminal illness. Housden's daughter Hannah struggled with a rare form of cancer and died at age 3. Even amid the pain and sorrow of Hannah's final year, the family shared profound moments of joy. Housden transformed them into "Hannah's Gift: Lessons from a Life Fully Lived" (Bantam, $11.95). The book recently came out in paperback. Housden spoke to the Daily News about "Hannah's Gift. " Q: Many times throughout the book, your children ask difficult questions about death and dying.
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NEWS
February 14, 2014
WHEN Attorney General Kathleen Kane declined to defend the state's anti-gay marriage statute last year, it seemed she could be the political messiah who'd drag Pennsylvania into the realm of progress - especially if she ran, as anticipated, for governor. That impression was shattered the following month, when she inexplicably prosecuted a dutiful, loving daughter for allegedly assisting her father's suicide. Kane lost the case this week against Philadelphia nurse Barbara Mancini, which was thrown out by Schuylkill County Judge Jacqueline Russell.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
I now write in defense of beautifully staged, meticulously lighted, handsomely dressed, genuinely acted, and shrewdly contrived soppiness. I make no apologies. You'll either detest the new musical Love Story , which has all that and more at the Walnut Street Theatre, or you'll give yourself over to stunning manipulation. You may regret it later - you've been played like a soulful cello by a cast of Yo-Yo Mas - but while you're being sucked in you'll be fully in the moment. That's what happened to me. In retrospect, it happened against all odds, in a show that has so much kissing, I wonder about the production's ChapStick bill; that's a stretch at 100 intermissionless minutes; that offers stereotyped characters cut from cardboard; that - like the book it came from - is a jarring mixture of glib repartee, lovey mush, and, finally, overwhelming sadness.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: When my husband, "Jeff," and I married, we drew up a medical proxy and health-care directives should future incapacitation arise. Jeff is now terminally ill with brain cancer and has about five months to live. I had to quit working because Jeff is now my full-time job. As his illness progresses, we have discussed placing him in a hospice. But the closer he gets to death, the more he changes his mind. He demands that I lift, jerk and pull him in and out of bed. He needs assistance eating, dressing, bathing and using the toilet and is in a wheelchair.
NEWS
February 6, 2012
NEW YORK - Ben Gazzara, whose powerful dramatic performances brought an intensity to a variety of roles and made him a memorable presence in such iconic productions over the decades as the original "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" on Broadway and the film "The Big Lebowski," died on Friday. He was 81. In 1955, he originated the role on Broadway of Brick Pollitt, the disturbed alcoholic son and failed football star in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. " In 1965, he moved on to TV stardom in "Run for Your Life," a drama about a workaholic lawyer who, diagnosed with a terminal illness, quits his job and embarks on a globe-trotting attempt to squeeze a lifetime of adventures into the time he has left.
NEWS
January 16, 2012 | By Alexia Elejalde-ruiz, Chicago Tribune
CHICAGO - Peyton "Pete" Dralle wasted little time after he learned doctors could do no more to treat his throat cancer. He took spur-of-the-moment trips, got his affairs in order and, when he finally agreed to care at San Diego Hospice, he documented his life story. Using a technique called dignity therapy, psychologist Lori Montross interviewed Dralle five months before his death about meaningful life moments, lessons he'd learned and those he wished to pass on to loved ones.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
An excised portion of a killer's brain could reveal whether he had a terminal disease when he attacked a family in its Douglass Township home this month. The Delaware County Medical Examiner's Office said Wednesday that it had removed Mark Geisenheyner's pituitary gland during an autopsy and sent it for testing. The move came days after reports emerged that the Pottstown man had told several people that inoperable tumors had been diagnosed shortly before his rampage. Geisenheyner, 51, died July 4 in a standoff with police in Trainer, two days after he opened fire on a family in its Montgomery County vacation home.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2011
DEAR ABBY: We have been friends with "The Bickersons" for quite some time. They never have a kind word to say to each other. Mr. B. now has a terminal illness, and you would think they'd be kinder to each other at a time like this. On the contrary, their fights are more groundless and vicious than ever. It is becoming increasingly difficult to be around them. This is when they need friends more than ever, but they're driving everyone away! What can we do? - Love Is All We Need DEAR LOVE: Although you might imagine that when a spouse has a terminal illness it would bring the couple closer together, that is not always the case.
NEWS
August 14, 2009 | By Matthew Spolar INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Glenn Johnson had done the math. Sentenced to a minimum of 27 years for killing Johnson's daughter and 269 others in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 above Lockerbie, Scotland, Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed al-Megrahi would serve about 36 days for each of his victims. Now, as Scottish officials consider freeing the terminally ill Megrahi less than halfway into his sentence, the numbers don't add up for Johnson. "That's just plain outrageous, that he could do 15 days for my daughter's death," said Johnson, 67, of Greensburg, Pa. Beth Ann Johnson was a 21-year-old student at Seton Hill College in Greensburg when she died on Dec. 21 in the Libya-sponsored bombing of the London-to-New York flight, which carried 38 New Jerseyans and 14 Pennsylvanians.
NEWS
May 28, 2009 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
When Sonal Gandhi's 8-year-old son was diagnosed with a rare metabolic disease seven years ago, the family took the conventional route of seeking out the best and most aggressive treatment in the hope of prolonging his life. But last year, as Yash's condition deteriorated and after months of discussion with her husband, Ashesh, the West Chester couple decided to take a path not often traveled by families of terminally ill children: They turned to hospice for help. Their decision was met with resistance from their doctors at the A.I. duPont Hospital for Children in Delaware, where Yash was being treated.
NEWS
May 1, 2009 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A year ago, when a doctor finally diagnosed the brain disease that had been making it harder for her to walk without falling, Rona Zelniker told her son and daughter that she was going to end her life while she still could, before complete disability set in. Her children were grateful for the way she prepared them, and for the time they had together at the end. "I must have cried 150 times in the last year," said Keith Zelniker, 32, her son....
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