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Terrorism

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NEWS
November 4, 2002 | By BILL FLETCHER JR
THE BOMBING of the Bali nightclub on Oct. 12 has reinvigorated our fears and concerns about international terrorism in general and al Qaeda in particular. It has also inadvertently highlighted some historical issues related to how we understand terrorism. After the Bali bombing, the Indonesian government commented to the effect that this was the worst act of terrorism in the history of the country. I found this statement puzzling, largely due to one fact: the year 1965. As detailed in an excellent PBS documentary, "Shadow Play" (released earlier this year)
NEWS
August 6, 1996 | BY LISA V. NORTON
It's insane. It's horrible, It's tragic. An airplane has exploded and crashed, killing everyone. For the victims, it's over, but for the living, it's a continuing nightmare. The media began talking of terrorism as the story was breaking, making suppositions before evidence had begun to be gathered. One news show even brought in a "terrorism expert" while there was still hope for survivors. They linked public consciousness to catastrophes like Lockerbie, the Oklahoma City federal building and Dharan, Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Reagan administration's ability to combat terrorism is steadily eroding - perhaps irrevocably - as damaging disclosures continue in the Iran-contra affair, according to members of Congress. Lawmakers, both Republicans and Democrats, said Friday that the administration was failing to regain credibility on the anti-terrorism front. Some criticized President Reagan for not moving more aggressively to take the offensive. "U.S. policy is muddled, and we're in a mess. We're wandering now," said Rep. Daniel A. Mica (D., Fla.)
NEWS
January 26, 2004
IJUST READ the story about the pizza deliveryman killed in Frankford. It states that he and his family came here for freedom and a better life. Then he is shot five times in Kensington, hit by a car in Oxford Circle - and the police won't help. Finally he gets murdered in Frankford delivering pizza. Some better life he found. He had a better chance of his dream of freedom and a new life if he moved to Iraq. This poor guy comes here to escape a terrible existence in his country and this is what he gets.
NEWS
January 9, 1986
I read with interest Georgie Anne Geyer's Jan. 2 Op-ed piece on the Palestine Liberation Organization and terrorism. One could well debate ad infinitum what factors should be on a list of the roots and causes of Palestinian terrorism. Such a list would include national and personal humiliation, as Ms. Geyer suggests. However, it seems far too simplistic to blame it all on humiliation. This is especially so, if one agrees with Ms. Geyer's implication that the sole source of that humiliation is Israeli actions.
NEWS
April 14, 2011 | By Carol Rosenberg, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that three of the 68 Guantanamo detainees released since Barack Obama became president have engaged in terrorism or insurgency, a senior administration told Congress on Wednesday. U.S. Ambassador Dan Fried, the diplomat who arranged many of the releases, disclosed the figure at a House Armed Services Committee hearing. He declined to say who the men were or where they were sent after Guantanamo. The rate of return-to-battlefield detainees, however, is far less than what the Defense Intelligence Agency determined it was during George W. Bush's administration.
NEWS
May 6, 1986 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau (The Associated Press contributed to this article.)
Calling Libya the primary offender, the heads of the seven major industrial democracies agreed yesterday to "make maximum efforts" against terrorism, but stopped well short of endorsing economic sanctions. Nonetheless, U.S. Secretary of State George P. Shultz said the agreement sent an unmistakable message to Libyan leader Moammar Khadafy: "You've had it, pal. " While the summit participants were discussing terrorism, a radical leftist Japanese group called Chukakuha claimed responsibility for a rocket attack that took place before the summit started, and threatened "a second round to blow up the Tokyo summit.
NEWS
June 20, 2002
CONGRATULATIONS on your editorial (July 13 "Wave the Flag, Don't Waive the Constitution") concerning Bush and Ashcroft wanting to deny basic constitutional rights to Jose Padilla for "saying he wanted to detonate a dirty bomb. " It is interesting to me that a case concerning Nazis in 1942 comes back to haunt us when the next fascists in our own history have come into power. The "War on Terrorism," like the "War on Drugs," is not a war. But the war is proclaimed to justify what the administration is doing: using emergency powers to control the populace and win the fight between the haves and have nots.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Jesse Jackson, known for his eloquence and globe-trotting diplomatic missions, seemed to struggle out loud yesterday to fashion a position on international terrorism. Jackson's struggle was a public one, apparent in a series of impromptu press conferences and press releases to clarify his views on dealing with terrorists, and initially intended to distinguish him from his Democratic rival, Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis. From Washington, D.C., to Pittsburgh, his views shifted with interviews.
NEWS
August 21, 2003
THOSE who think that the attacks against America and its people are over, think again! Those who think that we can relax are going to be in for a rude awakening. The Department of Homeland Security and other federal agencies can not protect this nation as they want you to believe. They alone will not stop or prevent another major attack by Islamic terrorists. Checking your bags in airports, having pilots carry firearms or even having air marshals on board airplanes will not prevent another attempted hijacking and slamming it into a building or a nuclear power plant - even though the government is trying to instill a "feel-good" sense about the president's war on terror.
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BUSINESS
June 28, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Air Products & Chemicals Inc., of Allentown, has more than 750 factories in 50 countries. One of its factories, in a town near Lyon, France, was in the global spotlight Friday after an attacker rammed a vehicle into a warehouse on the property, causing an explosion, and leaving behind a severed head on the factory entrance gate. "I am horrified and saddened by the attack on our facility in France. I believe I speak for all of our Air Products family around the world in expressing our deepest sympathies to the family of the victim of this unspeakable act," CEO Seifi Ghasemi said in a statement.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY THE REV. BRODERICK GREER
WHEN OPAL TOMETI, Alicia Garza and Patrisse Cullors created #Blacklivesmatter, their "love note to black people," they couldn't have had Wednesday night's terrorist attack at Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in mind. They were, however, mindful of the myriad ways in which black people throughout American history have been terrorized in their houses of worship, including the bombing of 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963. In the early 19th century, Mother Emanuel AME Church was itself destroyed by local white citizens who were committed to quelling the the embers of black rebellion sparked by Denmark Vesey.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
In a seemingly nonthreatening golf course community in Camden County, Benjamin and Susan Hemme have started a business chasing off monsters. Their weapon: A plump, orange, big-eyed, big-eared plush toy named Zimbobo with green swirls on its belly and back that emit ultrasonic waves that scare away monsters. An accompanying 28-page book, Goodbye Monsters , explains how it works. The Hemmes are a long way from quitting their day jobs - he, 38, is an aerospace propulsion technician; she, 35, is a marketing consultant at United Parcel Service Inc. Besides, they say, their entrepreneurial success as toy designers and authors won't be measured solely in dollars, but in nights of terror-free sleep achieved for children.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
I admit, I was quite horrified - like, shaken to my very core - by Unfriended , a horror pic with a new gimmick that likely will spawn an entire subgenre of more substandard rubbish. Unfriended unfolds entirely on a computer screen, the story and dialogue taking place among characters engaged in multiple acts of multiple-partner Skyping, Facebooking, and Googling. Possibly the single most uncinematic device ever used in a film, the gimmick must have made the studio suits jump with joy. Talk about low overhead!
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
The arrest last week of an alleged terrorism financier who sold kitchenwares and repaired phones at malls in Philadelphia and along the East Coast has cast new scrutiny on mall kiosks. The news had security analysts examining potential vulnerabilities in those relatively anonymous purveyors of bedazzled cellphone accessories, cheap jewelry, and names emblazoned on grains of rice. And talk among kiosk vendors at the city's shopping centers has turned toward trying to figure out where in Philadelphia Abror Habibov, 30, hung his shingle.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
More security cameras. More uniformed officers. More plainclothes officers. Those are the changes shoppers are likely to see at their local malls if legitimate terror threats are received, according to security experts. The Philadelphia office of the FBI said Friday that it was unaware of threats against local malls. But the bureau is monitoring the situation and communicating all the time with local law enforcement, Supervisory Special Agent J.J. Klaver said. "Every mall has a different threat signature, a different physical layout," said Jack Tomarchio, a former intelligence officer with the Department of Homeland Security.
NEWS
January 16, 2015
I SUSPECTED IT WOULD happen, just not as quickly as it did. Whenever acts of terror are committed in the name of Islam, there is generally a counter-attack from the enlightened, usually secular but always "progressive" flank of society in which the Islamic jihad is conflated with all types of religious fundamentalism. It can be seen in the letters to the editor, talking about how the Paris attacks were not about radical Muslims, and that other religions and other groups are equally guilty of violence, people like abortion-clinic bombers, and Jewish settlers in Israel, and the Western colonialists, and our jailers at Abu Ghraib and Gitmo, and so forth.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
TO BENEDICTE CLOUET, LOVE Park seemed like a good place to organize a rally in solidarity to the victims of terrorism. "It's a strong symbol, and we're all about symbols today," Clouet said last night as her countrymen gathered in the shadow of the park's namesake statue for the rally she helped organize. "This is such a perfect place to discuss principles and freedoms. " About 200 people braved the bitter cold last night to add their support to the victims of the terrorist attacks Wednesday on the offices of Charlie Hebdo , a Parisian newsmagazine.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Olivier de St. Martin slept fitfully Wednesday. So he climbed out of bed in his Cherry Hill home at 4 a.m., turned to the website of the French daily newspaper Le Figaro, and was shocked by a predawn bulletin about the massacre of 12 people by Islamic extremists at Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper in Paris. "When I saw the pictures," he said Friday, "well, first of all, I was pissed off, infuriated. " Throughout Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, amid a countrywide manhunt and two hostage-takings, the French-born owner of the Center City restaurants Caribou Cafe, Zinc Bistro, and Petit Roti was glued to news reports and social media, darting among Facebook, Radio-Television Luxembourg, CNN, and French and English websites.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
FOR THE FIRST time in more than five weeks, residents of Coulter Street near Lena in East Germantown could go to bed last night without fear that their rowhouse block would go up in flames at the hands of an arsonist: The suspected firebug was arrested and charged yesterday with setting at least two of the blazes. Leonard Monroe, 24, of Clearfield Street near 21st in Swampoodle, was locked up for allegedly setting fires on the block in the overnight hours Nov. 9 and Dec. 1, police said.
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