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Terry Mcmillan

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NEWS
May 15, 1997 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
Terry McMillan is a diva, whether she wants to be or not. So when she came into town yesterday to promote the paperback release of her fourth book, "How Stella Got Her Groove Back," we just had to trail her. What she was wearing: A long, multi-colored Moschino knit dress with a matching long knit coat and red sandals. She had her hair braided and up in a curly ponytail. The answer is 'yes': Terry is still with her (much) younger boyfriend, Jonathan Plummer. He's in his early twenties, she's 45. And yes, her 13-year-old son Solomon gets along with him fine.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | By Maida Odom, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Terry McMillan is up, she's pacing, she's looking out the window of her hotel on Manhattan's East Side. She's pouring coffee, she's puffing Kools, she's hanging limp like a rag doll. All the while, McMillan, the author, is raging. Rushing out of her mouth in a raspy, hard-edged voice are her insights into the feelings women have when they're disappointed, disrespected or fed up. And the anger she feels about being stereotyped as a writer. Her third novel, Waiting to Exhale, is a best-selling peek into the romantic lives of four black women.
NEWS
February 1, 1996 | By Marjorie Valbrun, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They waited in the cold to see her. They talked excitedly about her three novels. They wore fashionable hats adorned with those now-famous three words. But mostly they talked about her movie. By the time Terry McMillan, their sister, their voice, their friend, walked out on stage yesterday, the more than 850 black women who filled the room were breathless. "I couldn't think of a better way to kick off Black History Month than being in the presence of one of the hottest black authors," said Lynda Coverdale, a math teacher at Fitzsimons Middle School.
NEWS
September 16, 1998 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
It took a while for author Terry McMillan's life to catch up with her art imitating life, but she seems to be all squared away now. She's just gotten married to Jonathan Plummer, the young hunk who inspired McMillan's best-seller (and accompanying popular movie) "How Stella Got Her Groove Back. " The two wed on the beach during a writer's conference in Maui, Hawaii, the New York Post reports. McMillan, 46, met Plummer, 26, three years ago in Jamaica. Their romance apparently provided the grist for "Stella," in which a hot-shot career gal takes a vacation, falls for a sweet young thing on the beach and frets over whether their relationship could work long-term.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1996 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
It was deep into Q&A time. Nearly two hours, in fact, after more than 400 people had crammed into Community College of Philadelphia for "The State of Black Writing," the Saturday afternoon panel that anchors the always-feisty event known this year as the 12th Annual Celebration of Black Writing. Then the audience member at the mike wanted to know what the panelists thought about Alice Walker's The Color Purple, Terry McMillan's Waiting to Exhale, and other commercially successful novels-into-movies that "bash" black men. "We finally got the question," announced moderator Oliver Franklin with a mischievous grin.
LIVING
February 13, 1996 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Walter Mosley pens a series of whodunits featuring a black private eye and quickly becomes one of President Clinton's favorite authors. Connie Briscoe tells a tale of three African American sisters living and loving in Washington and gets a six-figure contract for her second book. Nathan McCall writes a hard and raw autobiography about growing up black, male and marginalized, and lands a movie deal. Just what can we read into this sudden demand for African American writing, this sudden proliferation of African American writers?
NEWS
May 17, 1993 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Terry McMillan eased into a chair, cocked her head to one side, and in a hushed, confessional tone, admitted that being a literary behemoth isn't all it's cracked up to be. "Yeah, I do get tired of answering the same questions over and over again," sighed the heavy-selling author of Waiting to Exhale, after running a gamut of heard-'em-all-before inquiries during an impromptu news conference before a reading in Camden, yesterday. "I've learned to deal with it, though. I know that tomorrow I'll be on a plane flying home where the only question I'll have to answer is, 'Mama, can I have a piece of candy?
NEWS
July 14, 2005 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The salacious news that Terry McMillan is divorcing her husband because he is gay has got the sister network working overtime. "Oh my God, I can't go anywhere! I took my son to the barber and they were talking about it," says Patty Jackson, WDAS-FM's (105.3) midmorning jock. "I think it's just devastating for Terry. He used her. " Everywhere, black women of all ages are talking about the nastiness and the deceit surrounding the breakup of the 53-year-old millionaire author and her 30-year-old Jamaican boy toy. Did she know?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2005 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sure, Terry McMillan used the story of her seemingly perfect love affair with Jonathan Plummer as the basis of her wildly popular fourth novel, How Stella Got Her Groove Back. But whatever - the marriage is over. She is beyond being devastated about discovering that her husband is gay. "I'm pissed off," she says from her San Francisco home. Does she love him anymore? "No. I haven't loved him since I found out who I loved was a lie. The person I fell in love with is not the person he really is. " Ever since word of the sordid story got out two weeks ago, Terry McMillan's marriage has been the center of conversation, at cookouts, on the telephone and Internet, among black women who simply can't believe her marriage hit the fan the way it did: Not Terry, whose dramatic relationship novels spoke directly to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* A DAY LATE AND A DOLLAR SHORT. 8 p.m. Saturday, Lifetime.   "DYING matriarch" might not sound like a dream role for an actress in her 50s, but Whoopi Goldberg's not complaining. "The View" co-host stars in Lifetime's adaptation of Terry McMillan's A Day Late and a Dollar Short , in which she's playing Viola Price, who, on learning that her next asthma attack will probably be her last, decides that it's time to straighten out her muddled family, which includes a straying husband (Ving Rhames)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* A DAY LATE AND A DOLLAR SHORT. 8 p.m. Saturday, Lifetime.   "DYING matriarch" might not sound like a dream role for an actress in her 50s, but Whoopi Goldberg's not complaining. "The View" co-host stars in Lifetime's adaptation of Terry McMillan's A Day Late and a Dollar Short , in which she's playing Viola Price, who, on learning that her next asthma attack will probably be her last, decides that it's time to straighten out her muddled family, which includes a straying husband (Ving Rhames)
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Hanging out with author Terry McMillan is like chillin' with your worldly, slightly acerbic, super-chatty aunt. In the 1990s, she ushered in the era of black women's chick lit with her New York Times best-selling novel-turned-movie, Waiting to Exhale . The latest of the 61-year-old McMillan's eight tomes, Who Asked You? , was released Tuesday, launching her first book tour in three years. It will bring her Thursday night to the Free Library of Philadelphia, where she will join Jesmyn Ward, winner of the 2011 National Book Award for Salvage the Bones . "Now, she can write," McMillan says of Ward.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When pop stars die too young it's always tragic, and often not all that surprising. Whitney Houston, who died at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles on Saturday at age 48, had the particular misfortune to have the swift and spectacular success of her early career followed by years spent living a deeply troubled public life under the watchful eye of a tabloid culture. If anybody ever seemed destined for success, it was Whitney Houston. Her mother was the vocalist Cissy Houston, her cousin was Dionne Warwick, her godmother was Aretha Franklin.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you've read anything by best-selling author J. California Cooper, you know that she would quickly tell you that basking in the spotlight is like making a direct call to the devil. Humans are their most foolish, she says, when they aren't humble. Extolling these simple truths has made the 79-year-old California native a favorite among generations of readers. Her books, which include seven short-story collections and five novels, are all about learning life's obvious lessons. Cooper's latest novel, Life Is Short but Wide (Anchor Books, 2009)
NEWS
September 26, 2010
By Terry McMillan Viking. 375 pp. $27.95 Reviewed by Karen E. Quiñones Miller Has it really only been 18 years since Terry McMillan wowed the publishing world with her book Waiting to Exhale ? It seems like forever! How I missed those four friends, Bernadine, Gloria, Robin, and Savannah (missed them in that order, by the way) and wanted to know how they were doing. Did Bernadine and her new man, James, have a happily forever after? My bet was they did. Bernadine deserved it after the way her ex-hubby did her. Hmph!
NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's fitting that author Elizabeth "Bebe" Moore Campbell was remembered at Girls High last weekend, a tribute long in the making. After all, it was there where Campbell learned the importance of sisterhood, which she coupled with determination - the two themes, her colleagues and friends said, that defined her and coursed through eight novels, three of which made the New York Times best-seller list in the 1980s and 1990s. Seventeen months after her death at age 56 from complications caused by a brain tumor, Moore's legacy in the form of passionate novels continues to teach, inspire and make us think.
NEWS
September 13, 2007 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Let's just say that no one is going to see Je'Caryous Johnson's Whatever She Wants for insight into the human condition. No, this new play is about romantic escapism, pure and simple. Johnson slides comfortably into Terry McMillan's abandoned beach chair - abandoned, mind you, pretty soon after that nasty business with her Jamaican player of an ex-husband, which just goes to prove Johnson's point that no one is immune to the pitfalls of modern love. Whatever She Wants is the name of a social club headed by ambitious yet lonely Vivian Wolf (Independence Day hottie Vivica A. Fox)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
AUTHOR TERRY McMillan is suing her former husband, alleging that he tried to smear her reputation during their highly publicized 2005 divorce. She seeks $40 million, so she thinks she had some reputation. McMillan, 55, filed the complaint Wednesday in a Contra Costa, Calif., court against Jonathan Plummer, 32, who inspired her best-selling 1996 novel, "How Stella Got Her Groove Back. " The book, adapted into a hit movie starring Angela Bassett and Taye Diggs, told the story of a 40-something woman who falls for a guy half her age. The suit says Plummer, a Jamaica native, wed McMillan in 1998 for U.S. citizenship.
NEWS
November 30, 2006 | By China Okasi
Bebe Moore Campbell means the world to literature, but she means even more to Philadelphia's girls. As a product of the Philadelphia public school system, she embodies the sense of promise and achievement that many of the city's girls could use. Campbell, 56, was the author of three New York Times best-sellers, but she began her career as a teacher. She earned a bachelor's degree in elementary education from the University of Pittsburgh and later taught school in Atlanta. Of course, she was still teaching and inspiring years later, as a journalist for Essence magazine and as a novelist.
NEWS
July 12, 2006 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Destiny Day, party planner to New York's music glitterati, totes Chanel and Gucci bags and struts her stuff in three-inch Jimmy Choos. She's got money in the bank, a few well-connected players to have fun with, and a heart that finds true love when least expected. Day is the high-rolling sistah in Last Night a DJ Saved My Life by Lyah Beth LeFlore (Harlem Moon/Broadway Books, $12.95), one of this season's new crop of "chick lit" books where the divas are black and beautiful, the men - whether in "slightly sagging" $200 jeans or Armani suits - are 6-foot-2 and gorgeous, and their glamorous lives collide in glamorous places such as MObar in Manhattan and star-studded Hamptons soirees.
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