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Terry Norris

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SPORTS
May 11, 1992 | By Robert Seltzer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Walking down a dim corridor in his hotel, flanked by his tearful camp members, Meldrick Taylor refused to cry. "I thought I could be courageous enough," Taylor said softly. "I thought my heart would pull me through. " Of all the weapons in his arsenal, his heart may be the most impressive, but it was not enough against Terry Norris on Saturday night at the Mirage. Norris clubbed Taylor to retain the World Boxing Council junior- middleweight title, scoring a technical knockout in the fourth round of a scheduled 12-round bout.
SPORTS
December 14, 1995 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Vaden had no breakfast this morning. He will have no lunch today. He had no breakfast or lunch yesterday, or the day before that, or the day before that. And he won't have breakfast or lunch tomorrow. No juice. No coffee. Not one dry cracker. Not even a drink of water or a tiny piece of ice. Not even after he has worked up a steamy sweat running three or four miles in the early-morning cold. Not even after he has done extra roadwork, as he sometimes does before big fights.
SPORTS
March 17, 1992 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Meldrick Taylor officially goes into training for his May 9 challenge of World Boxing Council super welterweight champion Terry Norris on April 1 - April Fools' Day. Some might say that Taylor, the World Boxing Association welterweight champion from Philadelphia whose title will not be on the line, is foolish to challenge a bigger man with comparable boxing skills and a pronounced edge in power. Besides, a fight with Norris (31-3, 17 knockouts) could jeopardize the thing everyone presumes Taylor (29-1-1, 15 KOs)
SPORTS
February 8, 1991 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was the Muhammad Ali of the lighter weight divisions - a consummate showman who could have entered the ring in top hat and tails instead of the customary gloves and short pants. For all the glitter and notoriety, however, Ray Charles Leonard came up in an age when pugs were pugs, when their only baubles were the championship belts they won in the ring. Now comes Terry Norris, the next partner on the Leonard dance card. Norris wears an earring. My, how times have changed.
SPORTS
February 8, 1991 | By Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
He has not said it in so many words, but it could be that whenever Terry Norris looks at Sugar Ray Leonard he sees . . . Buster Drayton. Drayton, a former International Boxing Federation junior middleweight champion, became the first ex-world titlist to face Norris when they squared off in Las Vegas on March 28, 1989. It was no contest: Norris's youth and speed easily offset Drayton's edge in experience, and the then-21-year-old Norris defended his North American Boxing Federation super welterweight crown with a 12-round shutout over the used-up, 36-year-old Philadelphian.
SPORTS
May 11, 1992 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Sugar Ray Leonard and Marvelous Marvin Hagler are retired. Thomas Hearns and Roberto Duran, their skills long since faded, remain active but are fighting a losing battle to hang onto the memories. To whom can boxing turn to find a non-heavyweight superstar, a 1990s equivalent to the Fab Four members who illuminated the '80s with their brilliance? Off his effort in a fourth-round technical knockout of Philadelphia's Meldrick Taylor Saturday night at The Mirage, World Boxing Council super welterweight champion Terry Norris has the requisite talent to pick up the torch laid down by his illustrious predecessors.
SPORTS
February 9, 1991 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Sugar Ray Leonard climbs into the ring tonight, he will be supported by the biggest entourage in boxing history - the nameless, faceless crowd at Madison Square Garden. Ticket sales may be lagging - Garden officials hope to attract about 12,000 fans to the 18,000-seat arena - but never mind. Leonard, who never needed anything but his own fists to score a victory, hopes his anonymous friends help unnerve his opponent, Terry Norris. He hopes Norris looks at these people - the fans, the ushers, the ring officials, the sportswriters, the broadcasters with their mini-cams, action- cams and pug-cams - and gets a debilitating case of, gulp, stage fright.
SPORTS
December 12, 1995 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Paul Vaden isn't quite sure how he came to be in frigid Philadelphia, looking out his hotel-room window at the icy streets below. "You have to be able to adjust," said Vaden, the International Boxing Federation junior middleweight champion from San Diego. "I lived in Flint, Mich., and Colorado Springs, Colo., for a time. I know what snow looks like. " Not that Vaden expected to be reintroduced to long johns and subfreezing temperatures on such short notice. But he will defend his title against World Boxing Council super welterweight champion Terry Norris, also of San Diego, Saturday night at the CoreStates Spectrum.
SPORTS
February 10, 1991 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everybody knows someone like Ray Charles Leonard. He is the last guest to leave the party, always looking for another hand to shake, another back to slap. But one of these days, it seemed certain, Leonard would stick around a little too long. Well, that day finally came, and the fact that it was inevitable did not make it any easier to witness. Fighting a man who was 11 years younger, and 11 years hungrier, Leonard became vulernable to the two biggest enemies a boxer can face - time and the left hook.
SPORTS
February 23, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Terry Norris rocked Carl Daniels with a strong right and knocked him out at 2 minutes, 37 seconds of the ninth round yesterday to retain his World Boxing Council super-welterweight title in San Diego. The fourth-ranked Daniels, whose left eye was swollen shut in the eighth round, fell forward slightly and was nudged to the floor after Norris landed the right. After Daniels quickly stood up, Norris connected with a short left and a right to end the fight. Norris improved his record to 31-3-1 with 17 knockouts.
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SPORTS
December 8, 1997 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maybe you didn't notice, but something big happened in boxing here Saturday night. There was a signal, perhaps a warning, that change is in the air. There was a shifting of the ranks. The crowd of 11,271 at Convention Hall on the Boardwalk saw new champions. New ideas. New voices. This morning, Terry Norris, 30, from San Diego, no longer is the World Boxing Council super-welterweight champion. Raul Marquez, 26, from Houston, no longer is undefeated and no longer is the International Boxing Federation junior-middleweight champion.
SPORTS
December 7, 1997 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Put another halo over the Golden Boy. Oscar De La Hoya showed why he is considered the best boxer in the world here last night, successfully defending his World Boxing Council welterweight championship with an eighth-round technical knockout over Wilfredo Rivera. The unbeaten former Olympic champion battered his opponent for most of the fight before referee Joe Cortez stopped the scheduled 12-rounder at 2 minutes, 48 seconds of the eighth round with Rivera bleeding from a cut below the right eye. De La Hoya (27-0)
SPORTS
March 1, 1997 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Someone asked Sugar Ray Leonard, a grandfather and six years removed from his most recent fight, which resulted in a terrible beating, if he considered himself one of top 10 middleweights in the world today. "Hell, yes," Leonard, 40, replied. Well, how about the top five? "Yeah," he answered. Top two, then? Top one? Leonard smiled, like the cat that ate the canary. He is not as young as he used to be, and probably not as quick, but that enormous ego has not been damaged one iota by the passage of time.
SPORTS
December 14, 1995 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Vaden had no breakfast this morning. He will have no lunch today. He had no breakfast or lunch yesterday, or the day before that, or the day before that. And he won't have breakfast or lunch tomorrow. No juice. No coffee. Not one dry cracker. Not even a drink of water or a tiny piece of ice. Not even after he has worked up a steamy sweat running three or four miles in the early-morning cold. Not even after he has done extra roadwork, as he sometimes does before big fights.
SPORTS
December 12, 1995 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Paul Vaden isn't quite sure how he came to be in frigid Philadelphia, looking out his hotel-room window at the icy streets below. "You have to be able to adjust," said Vaden, the International Boxing Federation junior middleweight champion from San Diego. "I lived in Flint, Mich., and Colorado Springs, Colo., for a time. I know what snow looks like. " Not that Vaden expected to be reintroduced to long johns and subfreezing temperatures on such short notice. But he will defend his title against World Boxing Council super welterweight champion Terry Norris, also of San Diego, Saturday night at the CoreStates Spectrum.
SPORTS
May 5, 1994 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
He didn't get a ticker-tape parade down Broadway after becoming the first man to officially defeat Julio Cesar Chavez. But then, Frankie Randall isn't a New Yorker and wouldn't want to be. He's a small-town guy from Tennessee who, for now, seems content to finally have been recognized and appreciated in the tiniest outposts of a world champion's realm. "They had a 'Frankie Randall Day' in Morristown," said a beaming Randall, who became the World Boxing Council super-lightweight champion with his historic Jan. 29 split decision over Chavez.
SPORTS
September 8, 1993 | By Robert Seltzer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a hotel ballroom in Las Vegas, an elegant place where clinches are performed during tangos, not fights. No matter. Terry Norris and Julio Cesar Chavez, turning a chance meeting into an unsanctioned bout, made fists at each other. Then a security guard intervened, and the confrontation ended before any chairs - or jaws - could be broken. That was in May, and both men remember the incident. Now, they are prepared to fight again - but not with each other. Chavez will meet welterweight champion Pernell Whitaker on Friday night at the Alamodome, while Norris faces the tough but seemingly overmatched Joe Gatti on the same card.
SPORTS
September 30, 1992 | By Robert Seltzer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hopping weight classes in an effort to find the best opponents - and best purses - the biggest names in boxing should become nomads next year. The list begins with the incandescent Julio Cesar Chavez, whose stature rises every time he laces on a pair of gloves. Chavez, the World Boxing Council junior-welterweight champion, is considering a rematch in the spring against Meldrick Taylor, who holds the World Boxing Association welterweight title. If Chavez won, he would receive a challenge from Terry Norris, the WBC junior-middleweight champion who is willing to step down in weight to meet the man the experts call "the greatest fighter in the world pound for pound.
SPORTS
September 26, 1992 | By Robert Seltzer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Battling the flu and the scale, Simon Brown was marooned in his own body, conscious but unable to make his arms and legs respond to his brain. Brown, once considered one of the greatest fighters in the world, became one of the most helpless. The result was a devastating loss to James "Buddy" McGirt, who captured the World Boxing Council version of the welterweight title with an almost flawless performance on Nov. 29, 1991. "I began fading in the second round," Brown said.
SPORTS
May 11, 1992 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Sugar Ray Leonard and Marvelous Marvin Hagler are retired. Thomas Hearns and Roberto Duran, their skills long since faded, remain active but are fighting a losing battle to hang onto the memories. To whom can boxing turn to find a non-heavyweight superstar, a 1990s equivalent to the Fab Four members who illuminated the '80s with their brilliance? Off his effort in a fourth-round technical knockout of Philadelphia's Meldrick Taylor Saturday night at The Mirage, World Boxing Council super welterweight champion Terry Norris has the requisite talent to pick up the torch laid down by his illustrious predecessors.
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