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Test Case

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NEWS
February 21, 2002
Here's an A-plus for the U.S. Supreme Court decision Tuesday on whether teachers should be able to have schoolchildren grade each other's work. The court ruled - in agreement with educators and the Bush administration - that it's reasonable for teachers to use peer-grading as a way of advancing class lessons. "It is a way to teach material again in a new context, and it helps show students how to assist and respect fellow students," wrote Justice Anthony M. Kennedy for a unanimous court.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Whitpain residents at odds over a request for floodlit signs identifying a new housing development have agreed to compromise with a sign that will be lighted until the zoning board's September meeting. "This is a test case," said zoning board Chairman Thomas Thistle during the meeting Thursday. The board voted, 3-0, to approve the temporary lighted sign at Norristown Road and postponed its ruling on the request until September, after residents have had time to consider the sample sign.
SPORTS
August 15, 2013 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Staff Writer
WE DON'T know a lot about the Eagles' defensive coaching staff, good, bad or indifferent. But watching Vinny Curry might tell us something. Seeing what he did in the first exhibition game, and where he goes from here, and how they manage to fit his explosive first step into an ever-changing scheme, might be an interesting test case for what kind of coaches they are. "The coaching staff obviously has got a plan for me, and I'm just very humble to...
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neighbors were far from pleased when they learned last summer that Horizon House Developmental Services had picked their Bucks County neighborhood for two new group homes for the mentally retarded. They packed Upper Southampton Township meetings to complain. Vandals threw a brick through a window at one of the homes. Neighbors picketed next to its front lawn. The group homes were really institutions, they contended, and didn't belong in their neighborhood, a collection of well-tended, mostly one-story homes built about 35 years ago. Without proper supervision, the mentally retarded residents might stray into their swimming pools, they said.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The latest wrinkle in a convoluted saga that involves politics, hard feelings, and government regulation could now cost Warminster enough money to warrant a standing line in its annual budget. The U.S. Justice Department has received so many complaints about poor disability access in township-owned facilities that it is making Warminster the test case in Pennsylvania for compliance, officials said. Many of those complaints have come from one person, fired four years ago from her job as a part-time coordinator for the 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act. Now, said Township Manager Robert Camarata, the agency will probably force Warminster to drastically increase efforts to make township-owned facilities accessible to the disabled.
NEWS
August 18, 1999 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bill Vogt, a sunbather who is challenging the right of local police to enforce a nudity ban on a federally owned portion of Higbee Beach, lost the first round yesterday. But the municipal judge who found Vogt guilty of violating a local ordinance against public nudity and a state administrative regulation restricting access to a portion of Higbee Beach said the defendant had laid the proper groundwork for a test case. "I find he was on federal land that day," Judge Peter Tourison said in court.
NEWS
October 7, 2002 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Chester County couple never intended to become a test case for spousal abuse. It happened anyway. A state Supreme Court ruling last month threatened Kellie Kirkner with jail if she did not testify against her husband in a domestic-violence case, setting a state legal precedent that drew mixed reviews. The spotlight remained on the Kirkners last week as a county jury heard graphic details about a 1999 altercation that prompted the legal scrutiny. After less than a half-hour of deliberations on Thursday, the jury of seven women and five men acquitted Joseph P. Kirkner 4th, 29, of Lincoln University, of simple assault.
NEWS
February 21, 1986 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
A New Jersey Supreme Court justice, upholding the state's professional- sports regulations, yesterday refused to allow a women's mud-wrestling troupe to perform in South Jersey nightclubs last night and tonight. Nevertheless, the Chicago Knockers, a traveling team of women who perform in bathing suits on muddy mats, will keep their scheduled appearance in Pennsauken tonight, according to their promoter. Instead of wrestling, the women will do "aerobics in the mud. " "Officially, the show's still on," said Steven Kudatzky, attorney for the Knockers, who were en route to New Jersey from Florida yesterday.
SPORTS
February 28, 1995 | By Frank Lawlor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you had to choose a linchpin for the goals John Lucas has set for his 76ers with two months left in the season, Brandon Joel Tyler would be a good name to consider. The initials he has gone by since boyhood, B.J., couldn't be more appropriate for Tyler, who moves too fast to be burdened by too many letters and syllables. It's hard to fathom, but Tyler moves too fast on a basketball court, too, although the prospect of harnessing his amazing natural speed could be a breakthrough for Lucas and the Sixers.
NEWS
April 1, 1999 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time in memory, Philadelphia officials are seeking to collect full bail money - more than $1 million - after a murder suspect failed to show up in court. The case involves David Heyon Nam, 21, who was free on bail while he awaited trial in the slaying of an Olney man in 1996. Nam disappeared on March 12 last year, the day he was scheduled for a hearing in Common Pleas Court. Nam's father, Gi Nam, a Montgomery County businessman, put up $100,000 - 10 percent of $1 million ordered by the judge - to keep him out of jail.
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SPORTS
August 15, 2013 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Staff Writer
WE DON'T know a lot about the Eagles' defensive coaching staff, good, bad or indifferent. But watching Vinny Curry might tell us something. Seeing what he did in the first exhibition game, and where he goes from here, and how they manage to fit his explosive first step into an ever-changing scheme, might be an interesting test case for what kind of coaches they are. "The coaching staff obviously has got a plan for me, and I'm just very humble to...
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge in Burlington County sentenced the man known as NJ Weedman to two years of probation and more than $3,400 in fines and fees Wednesday for possessing a pound of pot in his car nearly three years ago. Marijuana activist Ed Forchion had used the inconsistency of criminal and medical-marijuana drug laws to win acquittal on the more serious charge of drug distribution when he was tried in October. Forchion could have faced 10 years in prison on the distribution charge.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Lee Benson, 90, cofounder in 1983 of what is now the Netter Center for Community Partnerships at the University of Pennsylvania, died Feb. 10 at Springfield Hospital in Delaware County, of complications from a fall. The Netter Center works with 50 Penn faculty members to teach 1,600 Penn students each year to help mostly West Philadelphia High School students get into and succeed in college. "Our purpose is to improve learning in the schools and the quality of life in the community," said Ira Harkavy, the center director.
NEWS
July 12, 2006 | David Brooks
David Brooks is a New York Times columnist Sometimes history comes with previews. In the 1930s, the Spanish Civil War served as a precursor to the global conflict that was World War II. And in a smaller fashion, the primary battle playing out on the smiling lawns of upscale Connecticut serves as a preview for the national conflict that will dominate American politics for the next two years. This isn't a fight between left and right. It's a fight about how politics should be conducted.
NEWS
March 22, 2006 | By Frank Kummer and Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Almost from his first day as principal at Charles Brimm Medical Arts High in Camden, Joseph Carruth found himself sounding an alarm over grade fixing and test-score rigging - allegations that have embroiled the district in scandal. He and another administrator at the school discovered an alleged grade-fixing scheme within weeks of Carruth's arrival in July 2004, according to court documents. Twelve seniors at the school for high performers had apparently graduated with failing grades.
SPORTS
September 18, 2004 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Could the success or failure of the latest system for determining college football's national champion rest on one game? Believe it or not, that game could take place today, in Morgantown, W.Va. There is a new system in place, because the last system didn't produce the right teams. It was complicated, too. It had a strength-of-schedule ranking. It deducted points for losses. It gave out bonuses for "quality wins. " Those components are gone now. Now, computer polls count for a third of the formula.
NEWS
June 6, 2004 | By Chris Satullo
"A pimple on an elephant's hide. " With that elegant phrase, Philadelphia's managing director dismissed the issue of whether to restore skateboarding in LOVE Park. Thus, Philip Goldsmith rejected an offer from DC Shoes Inc. to give the city $1 million over 10 years to maintain LOVE. In return, the city would allow street skaters to regain their mecca for a limited time every day, minimizing the annoyance their rebellious, riveting sport would cause. This smart compromise was crafted by skaters working with a group called Young Involved Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 14, 2004 | By Andrew Sullivan
The country is in the midst of a grueling, nail-biting war; the economy is still showing signs of strain; the federal budget deficit is ballooning; millions are without health insurance; an American civilian has been decapitated by terrorists. But some people think this is the time to pass an emotional, divisive and completely unnecessary amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The dire problem afflicting the nation? That some gay couples in one single state will for the first time be allowed to marry one another under civil law. The first question to ask is: What conceivable harm could these couples be doing?
NEWS
February 24, 2004 | By Christine Flowers
There is a revolution going on, fueled by love, hope, and righteous indignation. Hundreds of gay and lesbian couples have been thronging the steps of San Francisco City Hall in the last two weeks, seeking official recognition for their unions. Ignoring state law to the contrary, the city clerk's office has been issuing licenses to men and women in tuxedos and veils, and has performed more than 3,000 same-sex ceremonies since mid-February. The courts have refused to enjoin the practice, holding that it poses no "immediate and irreparable harm.
NEWS
April 28, 2003 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was mere chicken feed, the defendant's attorney told the judge. But Municipal Judge Russell Annich 2d ordered the maximum penalty this month for 61-year-old chemistry professor Tamara Gund: a 30-day suspended jail sentence and a $4,000 fine. Gund's crime: Offering deer a square meal. The longtime Princeton Township resident, the first person penalized for violating the township's deer-feeding ban, has become a hero to local animal activists and a villain to municipal officials, who spend more than $150,000 a year to rid the township of its antlered scourge.
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