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Testimony

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NEWS
June 29, 2001 | By Brendan January INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A curse and a push ignited a series of events that led to charges of assault and terroristic threats against Dajuan Wagner, the Camden High School basketball star, according to testimony yesterday in the Family Division of Superior Court. Wagner is being tried with teammate James Pulliam and friend Dawuan Potter. Wagner and Potter, both 18, are charged with assaulting and threatening a senior at Camden High. Pulliam, 18, is charged with assaulting the boy and his 16-year-old sister.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal law enforcement authorities say that reputed mobster Dominick Canterino is a conduit between New York City record company mogul Morris Levy and Genovese crime family boss Vincent "The Chin" Gigante. But a federal judge ruled yesterday that the alleged relationship could not be brought out during a conspiracy trial in which Levy and Canterino are co- defendants. U.S. District Judge Stanley S. Brotman yesterday would not allow proposed testimony from two FBI agents about alleged organized-crime links among Levy, Canterino and Gigante.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane orchestrated an illegal leak to embarrass a critic and later lied about it under oath, according to a grand jury report made public Monday. The panel found that Kane's testimony was "riddled with inconsistencies" and that she lied about virtually every aspect of the leak, from her motivation to what she knew about the leaked documents and to who else was involved. In painting her as a liar, the grand jury relied on testimony from Kane's senior appointees, whose accounts were at odds with hers.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | New York Daily News
Raising their voices and waving their arms, defense lawyers yesterday hammered away at Howard Beach attack survivor Cedric Sandiford but were unable to shake the major parts of his story. In a blistering cross-examination that could be heard in the hallways of Queens Supreme Court, the lawyers pointed out minor inconsistencies in Sandiford's testimony and conflicts with testimony from other witnesses. But Sandiford, often outshouting the lawyers, stood firm that he, Michael Griffith, 23, and Timothy Grimes, 19, were attacked by 10 to 12 white teens armed with baseball bats and tree limbs last Dec. 20. Griffith was killed when he was hit by a car on the Belt Parkway while trying to flee.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Admitted mob underboss Philip Leonetti wasn't allowed to testify that attorney Robert F. "Bobby" Simone had been told twice in advance of plans to kill enemies of mob boss Nicodemo Scarfo. U.S. District Judge James T. Giles, who is presiding over Simone's racketeering trial, barred prosecutors from eliciting from Leonetti testimony that Scarfo had told Simone of plans to murder two underlings, the Daily News has learned. Leonetti, who is Scarfo's nephew, completed his testifying for the prosecution Tuesday without being asked about the alleged murder discussions.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | New York Daily News
The trial testimony of a New York City man who survived the Howard Beach racial attack contradicts stories he told to police and a newspaper reporter after the incident, the defense charged yesterday. "The testimony flatly contradicts what he said within a month or so of the incident," defense lawyer Ronald Rubinstein said after witness Cedric Sandiford completed his testimony in Queens Supreme Court. "Was he telling the truth then, or is he telling the truth now?" Rubinstein asked.
NEWS
October 28, 1986 | By Jane Cope, Special to The Inquirer
An Army private shot a Willingboro store clerk because she would not cooperate during a robbery in 1985, according to testimony yesterday in Burlington County Superior Court. Jacinto Koger "Joey" Hightower, 23, of Pageant Lane, Willingboro, is accused of fatally shooting Cynthia Barlieb, 25, of Hazelwood Circle, Willingboro, during a robbery attempt at a Cumberland Farms store on July 7, 1985. No money was taken from the cash register. Hightower could face the death penalty if the jury finds him guilty.
NEWS
May 24, 1986 | By John Woestendiek, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state police scientist had no basis for concluding in court that his laboratory tests showed gunshot residue on one of Terry McCracken's hands, McCracken's attorney contended in a motion filed yesterday in Delaware County Common Pleas Court. The motion is the latest - and probably the last - of several that lawyer John G. McDougall has filed requesting a new trial for McCracken, 22, who was convicted of second-degree murder, robbery and conspiracy in connection with the killing of David Johnston, 71, during a robbery in March 1983 at Kelly's Deli in Collingdale.
NEWS
February 20, 2009 | By Craig R. McCoy and Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
After testimony from 105 people, the last witness stepped down yesterday in the marathon federal corruption trial of former State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo, setting the stage for closing arguments next week. Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert A. Zauzmer is expected to spend most of Monday delivering the prosecution's closing, four months after fellow prosecutor John J. Pease gave the opening address Oct. 22. After defense lawyers Dennis J. Cogan and Edwin J. Jacobs Jr. give their closing addresses, Zauzmer will deliver a rebuttal.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to try to resolve the highly sensitive conflict between the welfare of young children and the rights of alleged sex offenders in the nation's steadily increasing number of child-abuse cases. The justices will decide by July whether a defendant's constitutional right to confront accusers face to face in open court may be limited when the accusers are children. Child psychiatrists believe that such a confrontation can be terrifying for a child, especially when the adult is a relative and the accusation involves sexual misconduct.
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NEWS
June 12, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE N-WORD took another complicated and controversial trip through the world of context yesterday during the civil trial of a white Fox 29 anchor who contends he was fired for saying it during a news meeting in 2007. Current and former Fox 29 employees, both black and white, testified that they were both offended and shocked when former anchor Tom Burlington chimed in about colleague Robin Taylor's story on symbolic burial of the notorious racial epithet by the Philadelphia Council of the NAACP.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The March 3, 2012, auto accident in Swampoodle that killed Anthony Reeder's girlfriend of two years left him uninjured but emotionally crushed. The next day, he opened up to an Inquirer reporter, describing the loss of 49-year-old Sheila Whalen, the accident, and a mysterious driver who fled the overturned Jeep Liberty in the 3100 block of Bambrey Street. "In a blink of an eye, your whole life can change," Reeder told the reporter. "I never, ever had someone who was a good friend, a girlfriend, and a confidante.
NEWS
May 30, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A longtime civilian worker in the Philadelphia Police Department was acquitted by a judge Thursday of charges that she brandished a gun and threatened to kill a South Philadelphia woman last summer during a dispute between families. Kathy Pugh, 53, was found not guilty of terroristic threats, simple assault, reckless endangerment, and conspiracy after a nonjury trial before Common Pleas Court Judge Joan A. Brown. Brown warned Pugh to stay away from the other family in the dispute.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Superior Court handed its second smackdown Wednesday to lawyers seeking to collect a fine of nearly $1 million against Philadelphia-area insurance defense lawyer Nancy Raynor. In a one-paragraph ruling, the court barred Philadelphia lawyers Matthew D'Annunzio and Joseph Messa from collecting the fine while it considers Raynor's appeal of the penalty. Raynor was fined $946,127 in November by Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Paul Panepinto, who accused her of permitting an expert witness to introduce banned testimony in a medical-malpractice trial in 2012.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
DURING GRAPHIC testimony yesterday, a former Philadelphia deputy medical examiner snaked a belt around prosecutor Peter Lim's neck, demonstrating for a jury how he believes Dr. Melissa Ketunuti's killer tightened a leather belt around her neck before setting her body on fire. Dr. Gary Collins, now Delaware's chief medical examiner, testified for the prosecution on the third day of trial for 39-year-old Jason Smith. Smith is the exterminator accused of killing Ketunuti, 35, before binding her neck, wrists and ankles and setting her body ablaze Jan. 21, 2013 when he visited her Southwest Center City rowhouse to address a rodent problem.
NEWS
May 9, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
In testimony that undercut the defense theory of an unknown killer, a Philadelphia fire marshal testified Thursday that the fire in the house of physician Melissa Ketunuti would have been set within minutes of the time exterminator Jason Smith was seen on video leaving the area. Defense attorney J. Michael Farrell, however, angrily objected to Lt. George Werez's testimony, challenging his expertise to estimate the time a fire was set from the amount of smoke in a building. Werez based his estimate on a hypothetical question posed by Assistant District Attorney Peter Lim, who cited earlier testimony about the amount of smoke in the house by a dog walker who arrived at 12:30 p.m. to exercise Ketunuti's dog and discovered her body burning in the basement.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Testimony in the federal corruption trial of six Philadelphia narcotics investigators concluded Monday with one of the defendants - Officer Michael Spicer - emerging from government grilling relatively unfazed. While prosecutors had tangled with previous defense witnesses in highly charged exchanges, Spicer's cross-examination was far less confrontational. Much of Assistant U.S. Attorney Maureen McCartney's questioning focused on what Spicer did not see in the 18 drug investigations flagged by the FBI as suspect and what might have happened when he was not around.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane orchestrated an illegal leak to embarrass a critic and later lied about it under oath, according to a grand jury report made public Monday. The panel found that Kane's testimony was "riddled with inconsistencies" and that she lied about virtually every aspect of the leak, from her motivation to what she knew about the leaked documents and to who else was involved. In painting her as a liar, the grand jury relied on testimony from Kane's senior appointees, whose accounts were at odds with hers.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After all the courtroom jostling and legal swordplay, it may in the end come down to this - the word of three witnesses against one. Any day now, Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Paul Panepinto is expected to issue his second and likely final ruling on the $1 million penalty he imposed on insurance defense lawyer Nancy Raynor. This decision has had the city's legal community buzzing. The emerging consensus is that the penalty, unprecedented in its magnitude, isn't justified based on the alleged offense and sets a terrible precedent.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
He is a self-described dirty cop with a suicide attempt in his past and a history of poor job performance, emotional instability, and lying under oath. The question now before for a jury is: Can anything former Philadelphia Police Officer Jeffrey Walker says be believed? Walker - the government's star witness in the federal corruption trial of six of his former narcotics squad colleagues - finished his testimony Thursday after three grueling days on the stand. By the end, the 46-year-old was clearly exhausted, his shoulders slumped and his head in his hands.
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