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Testimony

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NEWS
June 29, 2001 | By Brendan January INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A curse and a push ignited a series of events that led to charges of assault and terroristic threats against Dajuan Wagner, the Camden High School basketball star, according to testimony yesterday in the Family Division of Superior Court. Wagner is being tried with teammate James Pulliam and friend Dawuan Potter. Wagner and Potter, both 18, are charged with assaulting and threatening a senior at Camden High. Pulliam, 18, is charged with assaulting the boy and his 16-year-old sister.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal law enforcement authorities say that reputed mobster Dominick Canterino is a conduit between New York City record company mogul Morris Levy and Genovese crime family boss Vincent "The Chin" Gigante. But a federal judge ruled yesterday that the alleged relationship could not be brought out during a conspiracy trial in which Levy and Canterino are co- defendants. U.S. District Judge Stanley S. Brotman yesterday would not allow proposed testimony from two FBI agents about alleged organized-crime links among Levy, Canterino and Gigante.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | New York Daily News
Raising their voices and waving their arms, defense lawyers yesterday hammered away at Howard Beach attack survivor Cedric Sandiford but were unable to shake the major parts of his story. In a blistering cross-examination that could be heard in the hallways of Queens Supreme Court, the lawyers pointed out minor inconsistencies in Sandiford's testimony and conflicts with testimony from other witnesses. But Sandiford, often outshouting the lawyers, stood firm that he, Michael Griffith, 23, and Timothy Grimes, 19, were attacked by 10 to 12 white teens armed with baseball bats and tree limbs last Dec. 20. Griffith was killed when he was hit by a car on the Belt Parkway while trying to flee.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Admitted mob underboss Philip Leonetti wasn't allowed to testify that attorney Robert F. "Bobby" Simone had been told twice in advance of plans to kill enemies of mob boss Nicodemo Scarfo. U.S. District Judge James T. Giles, who is presiding over Simone's racketeering trial, barred prosecutors from eliciting from Leonetti testimony that Scarfo had told Simone of plans to murder two underlings, the Daily News has learned. Leonetti, who is Scarfo's nephew, completed his testifying for the prosecution Tuesday without being asked about the alleged murder discussions.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | New York Daily News
The trial testimony of a New York City man who survived the Howard Beach racial attack contradicts stories he told to police and a newspaper reporter after the incident, the defense charged yesterday. "The testimony flatly contradicts what he said within a month or so of the incident," defense lawyer Ronald Rubinstein said after witness Cedric Sandiford completed his testimony in Queens Supreme Court. "Was he telling the truth then, or is he telling the truth now?" Rubinstein asked.
NEWS
October 28, 1986 | By Jane Cope, Special to The Inquirer
An Army private shot a Willingboro store clerk because she would not cooperate during a robbery in 1985, according to testimony yesterday in Burlington County Superior Court. Jacinto Koger "Joey" Hightower, 23, of Pageant Lane, Willingboro, is accused of fatally shooting Cynthia Barlieb, 25, of Hazelwood Circle, Willingboro, during a robbery attempt at a Cumberland Farms store on July 7, 1985. No money was taken from the cash register. Hightower could face the death penalty if the jury finds him guilty.
NEWS
May 24, 1986 | By John Woestendiek, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state police scientist had no basis for concluding in court that his laboratory tests showed gunshot residue on one of Terry McCracken's hands, McCracken's attorney contended in a motion filed yesterday in Delaware County Common Pleas Court. The motion is the latest - and probably the last - of several that lawyer John G. McDougall has filed requesting a new trial for McCracken, 22, who was convicted of second-degree murder, robbery and conspiracy in connection with the killing of David Johnston, 71, during a robbery in March 1983 at Kelly's Deli in Collingdale.
NEWS
February 20, 2009 | By Craig R. McCoy and Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
After testimony from 105 people, the last witness stepped down yesterday in the marathon federal corruption trial of former State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo, setting the stage for closing arguments next week. Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert A. Zauzmer is expected to spend most of Monday delivering the prosecution's closing, four months after fellow prosecutor John J. Pease gave the opening address Oct. 22. After defense lawyers Dennis J. Cogan and Edwin J. Jacobs Jr. give their closing addresses, Zauzmer will deliver a rebuttal.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to try to resolve the highly sensitive conflict between the welfare of young children and the rights of alleged sex offenders in the nation's steadily increasing number of child-abuse cases. The justices will decide by July whether a defendant's constitutional right to confront accusers face to face in open court may be limited when the accusers are children. Child psychiatrists believe that such a confrontation can be terrifying for a child, especially when the adult is a relative and the accusation involves sexual misconduct.
NEWS
July 1, 1987 | By Emilie Lounsberry and Daniel R. Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writers
Robert N. Rego, chief aide to City Councilman Leland M. Beloff, testified yesterday that gangster Nicholas Caramandi had guided Beloff's hand to his chest, a gesture the prosecution contends was a voluntary signal that the councilman was in on a $1 million extortion scheme. In testimony that differed from his previous statements from the witness stand, Rego said his recollection of the June 1986 meeting at Marabella's restaurant in Center City had improved since April, when he and Beloff were first on trial on federal extortion charges.
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BUSINESS
February 20, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Pennsylvania appellate court has temporarily halted imposition of nearly $1 million in penalties against defense lawyer Nancy Raynor, who was sanctioned last year for breaching a court order barring her witnesses from testifying that a woman suing for medical malpractice had been a longtime smoker. The Superior Court order, issued Wednesday, gave Raynor access to business accounts that had been frozen and halted garnishment of fees from insurance-industry clients. It also ordered Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Paul Panepinto to hold a hearing on new evidence that Raynor's lawyers contend shows she took steps to ensure witnesses not offer precluded testimony.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia homicide detective testified Thursday about a pivotal moment when, she says, accused child-killer Margarita Garabito admitted hitting her 10-year-old stepdaughter in the head with a metal broom handle. It was late afternoon on Oct. 21, 2009, Detective Norma Serrano told the Common Pleas Court jury hearing Garabito's murder trial, and she was talking with Garabito in a homicide interview room at police headquarters. Serrano was there, she told the jury, because she spoke fluent Spanish and Garabito did not speak English.
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next-door neighbor of accused child-killer Margarita Garabito told a Philadelphia jury Thursday that she felt betrayed by a woman she considered a "close friend. " Wanda Torres spent an emotional two hours testifying about the year leading up to the Oct. 21, 2009, death of 10-year-old Charlenni Ferreira, Garabito's stepdaughter. Her testimony could help and hurt both the prosecution and the defense in Garabito's murder trial. Questioned by Assistant District Attorney Andrew Notaristefano, Torres recalled watching Garabito walking with Charlenni shortly before her death.
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia judge who imposed sanctions of nearly $1 million on defense lawyer Nancy Raynor has defended his action in an opinion in which he accused Raynor of violating a court order as part of a trial strategy. Common Pleas Court Judge Paul Panepinto said Raynor intended to elicit testimony from a witness that was precluded at the start of the trial. In the opinion, his first official explanation of the underlying facts and legal rationale for the penalty, Panepinto also accused Raynor of repeatedly changing her story as she challenged efforts by opposing lawyers to have her sanctioned.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
In scientific testimony that undercut the defense of accused child-killer Margarita Garabito, a former Philadelphia medical examiner testified Wednesday that 10-year-old Charlenni Ferreira's five ribs were broken over one to four weeks - at a time when the girl's father was out of the country. Defense attorney J. Michael Farrell has told the jury that Garabito, 48, will testify that Charlenni was beaten and sexually abused by her father, Domingo Ferreira. But the testimony of Marlon Osbourne - now an associate medical examiner in Broward County, Fla. - if accurate, would make it impossible for the father to have inflicted the fatal injuries, because he was in the Dominican Republic visiting relatives from Sept.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
AS A PROSECUTOR showed a Common Pleas jury a photo of 10-year-old Charlenni Ferreira, her face battered and bruised, one juror held a wooden clipboard to his mouth, his face reddened. Another clasped her mouth with a hand. The girl in the photo was dead. Prosecutors contend that her stepmother, Margarita Garabito, 48, who is on trial for murder and related offenses, beat her to death. On the day of Charlenni's death, Oct. 21, 2009, her body was examined at the city Medical Examiner's Office.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question of whether charter school magnate Dorothy June Brown is competent to be retried on charges that she defrauded her schools of $6.3 million now lies with a federal judge. A three-day hearing, during which psychiatrists and psychologists expounded on Brown's mental state, concluded Friday with testimony from defense expert Barbara Malamut, who told the court that Brown had cognitive impairment that would prevent her from assisting her defense in her retrial. Malamut's testimony clashed with that of earlier government witnesses who offered rosier assessments of Brown, concluding she exhibited no sign of mental illness.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a daylong briefing on immigration detention Friday, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights in Washington heard testimony on a range of issues, including "institutional sexual assault" and the criminal charges filed recently against a guard at the Berks County Residential Center. The Leesport facility, under a contract with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, houses immigrants and their children while they await deportation proceedings. The guard, Daniel W. Sharkey, 40, of West Reading, was charged Jan. 16 over his alleged involvement with a 19-year-old Honduran woman who was housed at the facility with her 3-year-old son. He was not identified before the commission.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four preteen boys gave graphic testimony Tuesday about their football coach repeatedly sexually assaulting them in his North Philadelphia home. The youths echoed testimony earlier in the week against Leon Watson, 25, who coached the Little Vicks and Rhawnhurst Raiders. One of the boys, an 11-year-old wide receiver for the Vicks, told the Common Pleas Court jury about when he was assaulted last year in Watson's home in the 2400 block of West Diamond Street. The boy said he had been suspended from school for fighting and had gone to Watson's home because his mother could not take care of him during the day. While he watched television with Watson, the coach began fondling him, the youth said.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the end, prosecutors were content to hear Clarence Davis admit his guilt. The plea deal for a 1970 murder case was reached Thursday before a judge even heard the appeal, and Davis' life sentence concluded late Friday night when he was released from Graterford Prison after 43 years of incarceration. "It was a legitimate admission of guilt," said Robin Godfrey, an assistant district attorney. "It avoids putting the victims through another trial, where there is a possibility of a 'not guilty' verdict because of the age of the case.
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