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NEWS
April 18, 1986 | By Jane Cope, Special to The Inquirer
Defense attorneys argued yesterday that contradictions between the testimony of two key prosecution witnesses should convince jurors that the wrong men are on trial for the 1984 slaying of a Willingboro man. "The two of them are walking, breathing reasonable doubts," Edwin Jacobs said of the witnesses, Paul Grant and Jennifer Lyn Schall, in his closing statement. The two had testified earlier that Dwayne A. Wright, 22, and James D. Clausell, 21, both of Temple Road, Philadelphia, had killed Edward Louis Atwood.
NEWS
May 19, 1986 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
The panel that is reviewing Haverford Township's home-rule charter heard testimony last week from Commissioner Fred Moran, the seventh commissioner to offer his views on how the charter is working. Moran said he thought the language of the charter should be "tightened up" so that someone who held office in the township could not simultaneously hold another elected job somewhere else. What the panel has called the "ambiguity" of the charter has allowed such a situation to occur, with Commissioner Joseph Kelly also holding a job as a member of the Delaware County Council.
NEWS
August 7, 1986 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
According to several jury members, four elements forged the jury's finding that Wilfredo Santiago murdered Philadelphia police Officer Thomas J. Trench: Santiago's history of fistfights. Evidence suggesting that Santiago owned a gun. Alleged jailhouse confessions. A witness who changed his prior testimony and placed Santiago near the scene of the crime with a gun. Four jurors - two regular panel members and two alternates - agreed to discuss the case in detail last night.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal prosecutor yesterday accused an Upper Darby police officer testifying for the prosecution of "tailoring his testimony" to try to aid three of five fellow officers on trial on charges of violating the civil rights of two township residents. The brief, intense exchange between Assistant U.S. Attorney Ronald H. Levine and Robert F. Smith, a 21-year veteran patrolman testifying under a federal grant of immunity from prosecution, came during the second day of often contradictory testimony by Smith.
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | By R.A. Zaldivar and Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Former national security adviser Robert C. McFarlane acknowledged yesterday that he repeatedly had misled Congress about the nature and extent of the Reagan administration's dealings with Iran and the Nicaraguan rebels. In his second day of testimony before congressional committees investigating the Iran-contra affair, McFarlane was led through a web of misstatements and omissions going back more than two years. While McFarlane allowed that he had been "too categorical" and had used "tortured language," he never admitted he had deceived members of Congress.
NEWS
May 31, 1986 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
A secretary who works for Main Line neurosurgeon Samuel S. Lyness yesterday contradicted some testimony by an Ardmore woman who has alleged that she was sexually assaulted by the doctor during an office visit. Testifying in Norristown before Louis Seltzer, a hearing examiner for the state Board of Medical Education and Licensure, the secretary, Linda Doherty, said that either she or another office worker was always in the examining room when Lyness treated a female patient.
NEWS
March 18, 1986
"You wanted me to be candid," said the witness. And he was. For an hour, Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Thomas J. McCormack described how politics, patronage, favoritism, influence-peddling, fund- raising and unaccountability are an everyday fact of life in the city's courts. Politicians call judges for favors; judges call politicians for campaign endorsements; lawyers call judges for special treatment, and judges call lawyers for political contributions. Judge McCormack was the only jurist to appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee at a hearing last week in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
September 14, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
University of Florida basketball coach Norm Sloan, assistant Monte Towe and university boosters gave thousands of dollars to athletes, including former basketball star Vernon Maxwell, who used the money to buy cocaine, according to grand jury testimony disclosed in newspaper reports yesterday in Gainesville. The testimony was included in a motion filed on behalf of four Florida sports agents charged with defrauding the university, the IRS and the U.S. Department of Education by making secret payments to athletes during their college careers, according to a report by The Gainesville Sun and a copyright story in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | By John Shiffman and Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Trial testimony and documents yesterday drew Mayor Street ever closer to the events under scrutiny in the City Hall corruption investigation. In a federal courtroom, former city Finance Director Janice Davis testified that Street chastised her for ignoring a request for inside information on city financing - a request from lawyer, power-broker and Street friend Ronald A. White. Street "was a little disturbed that I had kind of blown Ron off," Davis testified. "I understood then that Ron was a friend of the mayor's and I should take his request seriously.
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