CollectionsTestimony
IN THE NEWS

Testimony

NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question of whether charter school magnate Dorothy June Brown is competent to be retried on charges that she defrauded her schools of $6.3 million now lies with a federal judge. A three-day hearing, during which psychiatrists and psychologists expounded on Brown's mental state, concluded Friday with testimony from defense expert Barbara Malamut, who told the court that Brown had cognitive impairment that would prevent her from assisting her defense in her retrial. Malamut's testimony clashed with that of earlier government witnesses who offered rosier assessments of Brown, concluding she exhibited no sign of mental illness.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a daylong briefing on immigration detention Friday, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights in Washington heard testimony on a range of issues, including "institutional sexual assault" and the criminal charges filed recently against a guard at the Berks County Residential Center. The Leesport facility, under a contract with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, houses immigrants and their children while they await deportation proceedings. The guard, Daniel W. Sharkey, 40, of West Reading, was charged Jan. 16 over his alleged involvement with a 19-year-old Honduran woman who was housed at the facility with her 3-year-old son. He was not identified before the commission.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four preteen boys gave graphic testimony Tuesday about their football coach repeatedly sexually assaulting them in his North Philadelphia home. The youths echoed testimony earlier in the week against Leon Watson, 25, who coached the Little Vicks and Rhawnhurst Raiders. One of the boys, an 11-year-old wide receiver for the Vicks, told the Common Pleas Court jury about when he was assaulted last year in Watson's home in the 2400 block of West Diamond Street. The boy said he had been suspended from school for fighting and had gone to Watson's home because his mother could not take care of him during the day. While he watched television with Watson, the coach began fondling him, the youth said.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the end, prosecutors were content to hear Clarence Davis admit his guilt. The plea deal for a 1970 murder case was reached Thursday before a judge even heard the appeal, and Davis' life sentence concluded late Friday night when he was released from Graterford Prison after 43 years of incarceration. "It was a legitimate admission of guilt," said Robin Godfrey, an assistant district attorney. "It avoids putting the victims through another trial, where there is a possibility of a 'not guilty' verdict because of the age of the case.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia man serving life in prison for the 1970 murder of a bar owner was granted parole Thursday after a legal battle over what he alleged was prosecutorial misconduct. Clarence R. Davis, 64, had been sentenced to life without parole for the shooting death of Arthur Gilliard during a shotgun robbery of the Polka Dot Bar near 15th and Clearfield Streets. On Thursday, Davis pleaded guilty to the lesser offense of third-degree murder, as well as robbery and two firearms offenses, in a deal with the District Attorney's Office approved by Common Pleas Court Judge Lillian Harris Ransom.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even in Texas, testified business owner Suzanne Lee, Philadelphia's Ironworkers Union Local 401 was reputed to be one group you didn't want to cross. But when one of her best customers at Ultimate Tower Service Inc. asked her to work on a 1,000-foot television tower in Roxborough, she overcame her reluctance, she told a federal jury Tuesday. "We had multiple jobs from the owner of the tower, American Towers, and we didn't want to turn any work down," Lee said. "But we didn't want to come to this area.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
A PHILADELPHIA jury will begin to deliberate the fate of fallen hero ex-cop Richard DeCoatsworth on Monday, after having absorbed three days of trial testimony filled with allegations of lies and violence. DeCoatsworth, 28, who survived a shotgun blast to the face as a rookie cop in 2007, is charged with aggravated assault, simple assault and reckless endangerment for allegedly attacking Sadie Martinez on May 9, 2013 at the Port Richmond home they shared. Martinez, 29, testified Wednesday that she and the defendant got into an argument about his car keys at 1 a.m. which resulted in him punching her in the mouth, choking her and throwing numerous objects at her. After fleeing the house barefoot, Martinez said, she screamed for help awakening the next door neighbors, who called police.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
The early-morning car accident that left Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane with a concussion last month occurred hours before she was scheduled to testify in a grand jury investigation into possible improper leaks by her office, according to people with knowledge of the case. It was the second time this fall Kane canceled plans to take the stand, the sources said. Kane was scheduled to appear that morning in a Montgomery County courtroom, where a special prosecutor is examining how confidential records about a 2009 investigation run by her Republican predecessors became public.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Days after Rahim Hicks was shot dead outside a Chester restaurant, Kandie Meinhart gave police a statement implicating Jamir Williams, her child's father, as the shooter. Less than two weeks ago, she met with prosecutors to prepare for his trial. But in testimony Wednesday in Delaware County Court, Meinhart said she could not remember many details - even after prosecutors played her taped statement for the jury. The sudden bout of forgetfulness from what was supposed to be a key witness frustrated Assistant District Attorney Sandra Urban, who asked that Meinhart be treated as a hostile witness on the second day of Williams' trial.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rahim Hicks loved to fish, enjoyed NASCAR, had an entrepreneurial streak, and was a junior member in a volunteer fire company. Jamir Williams failed to finish eighth grade, never learned to read, was found to have ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder, and, according to his family, was profoundly affected by his brother's unsolved killing. Prosecutors say the paths of the two Chester men intersected at 3:30 a.m. July 24, 2010, in the doorway of J&S Seafood on Kerlin Street. Words were allegedly exchanged and five shots fired.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|