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Tevye

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1990 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
The Israeli actor Topol was only 30 years old when he began playing Tevye, the poor turn-of-the-century Russian-Jewish dairyman of "Fiddler on the Roof" who has five marriageable daughters and a personal relationship with God. Which was considered such a challenging assignment for a young actor - Tevye calls for a man between 55 and 65 - that Topol almost didn't get the part. What pushed him over the edge was a film role three years earlier in which he had successfully portrayed an aging rogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Theodore Bikel has played Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof more than a thousand times over the last 27 years. One reason he is cast, of course, is the need for a name actor to attract audiences. But Bikel provides much more than that. He makes a fine Tevye. Tevye is the heart and soul of Fiddler on the Roof, and Bikel is the heart and soul of the touring production playing through the weekend at the Merriam Theater. He was certainly the best part of the generally flat performance on opening night Wednesday.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Over the last week, actor Eddie Mekka has become older and wiser. His back- to-back roles at the Bucks County Playhouse have aged him. After Sunday's performances of Little Shop of Horrors, Mekka shook off the nerd-like character of Seymour Krelbourn and matured into the patriarchal Tevye for the Playhouse production of Fiddler on the Roof, scheduled to open last night in New Hope. "Summer stock is where I learned theater. Before you finish one show, you're learning the lines for the next," Mekka said.
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | For The Inquirer / LINDA JOHNSON
The traditions of the little town of Anatevka will be seen on the stage of the Little Theater of Abington Junior High School when "Fiddler on the Roof" is presented by the students. Rehearsing for the musical, which opens March 11, are (from left) Andrea Douglas, Rachel Hammond and Marissa Lucciani, playing Tevye's daughters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1990 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Fiddler on the Roof has returned to the stage in the 25th anniversary production that brings a strong sense of new life to the musical. The touring company that opened last night at the Forrest Theater is headed by Topol, the Israeli actor who starred in the film version of the classic Broadway show. He has portrayed Tevye, the milkman, before on the stage, and he adapts knowingly to the larger demands of the live theater. His Tevye is as much a performance as it is a characterization.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2011
Sholem Aleichem: Laughing in the Darkness. Superb documentary about creator of Tevye the Dairyman, the prototype of the Jewish comic voice who laughed to keep from crying. No MPAA rating . Drive. Shamelessly entertaining action thriller starring Ryan Gosling as a Man With No Name and few words. He daylights as a stuntman, moonlights as a getaway driver, and will go to any lengths to help his pretty neighbor. With Albert Brooks. R Higher Ground. In a stunning directorial debut, actress Vera Farmiga tells the love story of a woman who embraces her evangelical faith yet wants proof of God's existence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2004 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
It is ironic that the uninspired new song gratuitously added to the second act of Fiddler on the Roof should be titled "Topsy-Turvy," because the strength of this welcome and well-executed new production is its sustained sense of balance. Led by Alfred Molina, a bold but effective choice as Tevye, and directed by David Leveaux, this is a Fiddler that heightens the impact of its emotional crests through the control and restraint it uses to build toward them. To appreciate their collaboration fully, you have only to consider the problem they faced.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2001 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Over the last 34 years, Theodore Bikel has played the role of Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof more than 1,600 times. At 77, he is still at it, and his performance in the touring production of the musical at the MannCenter for the Performing Arts shows that advancing age is no reason to quit. He is still very much up to the part. With his snow-white beard, Bikel looks a little elderly to be playing a character who still has two young daughters at home, but his age is not evident in the way he plays the part.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1990 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
One cannot fault a musical with the glorious history of "Fiddler on the Roof" for its swagger. The cast of the 25th anniversary edition of the Joseph Stein-Jerry Bock-Sheldon Harnick musical took command of the Forrest stage last night with chins out, shoulders back and eyes - well, not quite defiant but somewhat more than confident. And they delivered. Some 90 minutes into the evening, moments before the provincial cossacks broke up the wild, wild wedding scene ending Act 1, the opening night audience of the four-week run was clearly on the ropes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
I was a teenager when my parents took me to see Fiddler on the Roof on Broadway with Zero Mostel and Beatrice Arthur in 1964. I didn't realize then that my relationship with this sweet, heartfelt, unsettling musical would become a lifelong affair. Whenever Fiddler was around, it was like going to the synagogue on a Jewish holy day: No questions asked, I just went. The story of a Jewish village in Russia at the outset of the Russian Revolution, and of Tevye the milkman, his wife, and their five daughters was a part of me, but it extends to all Americans who are here because their ancestors were chased out, dragged away, unwanted, terrorized, or just plain hated.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2011
Sholem Aleichem: Laughing in the Darkness. Superb documentary about creator of Tevye the Dairyman, the prototype of the Jewish comic voice who laughed to keep from crying. No MPAA rating . Drive. Shamelessly entertaining action thriller starring Ryan Gosling as a Man With No Name and few words. He daylights as a stuntman, moonlights as a getaway driver, and will go to any lengths to help his pretty neighbor. With Albert Brooks. R Higher Ground. In a stunning directorial debut, actress Vera Farmiga tells the love story of a woman who embraces her evangelical faith yet wants proof of God's existence.
NEWS
August 3, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an intensely active professional-theater town - where some weeks see a half-dozen openings and one show in four is a world premiere - an oldie but goodie from America's longest-running theater has seized the day. Fiddler on the Roof , the Walnut Street Theatre's final mainstage show of the season, swept the nominations announced Monday for the 16th annual Barrymore Awards for Excellence in Theatre, the region's professional theater honors....
NEWS
August 2, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an intensely active professional-theater town - where some weeks see a half-dozen openings and one show in four is a world premiere - an oldie but goodie from America's longest-running theater has seized the day. Fiddler on the Roof , the Walnut Street Theatre's final mainstage show of the season, swept the nominations announced Monday for the 16th annual Barrymore Awards for Excellence in Theatre, the region's professional theater honors....
NEWS
August 2, 2010
Becky Shaw The Wilma Theater The Breath of Life Lantern Theater Company The History Boys Arden Theatre Company If You Give a Mouse a Cookie Arden Theatre Company Welcome to Yuba City Pig Iron Theatre Company Gabriel Quinn Bauriedel Welcome to Yuba City /Pig Iron Theatre Company James J. Christy Rabbit Hole /Arden Theatre Company Walter Dallas Blue Door /Arden Theatre Company...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I was a teenager when my parents took me to see Fiddler on the Roof on Broadway with Zero Mostel and Beatrice Arthur in 1964. I didn't realize then that my relationship with this sweet, heartfelt, unsettling musical would become a lifelong affair. Whenever Fiddler was around, it was like going to the synagogue on a Jewish holy day: No questions asked, I just went. The story of a Jewish village in Russia at the outset of the Russian Revolution, and of Tevye the milkman, his wife, and their five daughters was a part of me, but it extends to all Americans who are here because their ancestors were chased out, dragged away, unwanted, terrorized, or just plain hated.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This tale of a fiddle, a young man, and his bond with a beloved Broadway show goes way back - to Babruysk, Russia, when pogroms were destroying Jewish villages more than 100 years ago - and then swings forward, all the way to today, to a roof in Center City. Well, a sort-of roof - one that floats nightly above the stage of the Walnut Street Theatre. Violinist Alexander Sovronsky sits atop it and plays a melody with a melancholy lilt in the first and final scenes of the Walnut's production of Fiddler on the Roof, which opened Wednesday after a week of previews.
NEWS
December 16, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
In Philadelphia Theatre Company's production of 25 Questions for a Jewish Mother, Judy Gold lets you know you're among mishpuchah (family) right from the get-go. "My apartment building is like a kibbutz," says the 6-foot-3 Jewish kosher lesbian comedian and single mother of two - "everyone is always helping everyone out. " In Gold's one-woman show, cowritten by Kate Moira Ryan, Manhattan's Upper West Side is a glorified shtetl, her children's godparents live next door, and Tevye sings not about "Tradition!"
LIVING
September 7, 2007 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
The honeymoon is over. Forever, a cynic might say. A few weeks ago, Holly Griscom came back from her wedding trip and moved next door to her mother- and father-in-law, and two houses away from her sister- and brother-in-law. "It's definitely different. We're surrounded," says Holly, 26, who lives with her new husband, Jason Griscom, 27, in a house that nuzzles the 150-year-old Colonial of her in-laws, Juanita and Jay Griscom, in rural Woolwich Township, Gloucester County. Jason's sister and brother-in-law, Christie and Russell Marino, live on the other side of the newlyweds.
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