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NEWS
June 27, 2003
The U.S. Supreme Court did something sensible, significant and overdue yesterday. In overturning a Texas law that criminalized gay sex, it affirmed what should have been obvious all along in a democracy with a Bill of Rights: The government should not bust down people's doors and arrest them for intimate acts of mutual consent. The court affirmed that, in a nation with a Bill of Rights, every citizen has a zone of privacy that government should not violate - except for a compelling national interest.
NEWS
August 31, 2016 | By Mike Stack
Of all the votes I cast as a state senator, it might be the one I regret the most. I hope current members of the Pennsylvania Senate don't make the same mistake this year when they consider the oppressive, new abortion restrictions contained in House Bill 1948. In 2011, legislation came before the state Senate to place new requirements on abortion providers. In the wake of the Dr. Kermit Gosnell matter, the legislation was couched as an effort to protect women's health. Too late, I realized it was really an attack on lawful abortion providers and on women's rights.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Could headline-grabbing scenarios like those in Texas and California involving brain-dead patients happen here? Yes, experts say. First, Texas: Marlise Munoz, 33, was found by her husband, Erick, at 2 a.m. Nov. 26 on their 2-year-old son's bedroom floor. Her heart had stopped for perhaps an hour after a pulmonary embolism. Her husband began CPR, called 911. She was 14 weeks pregnant. Her family stated from the beginning - only confirmed by the hospital last week - that Munoz was brain-dead.
NEWS
October 21, 1997 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Supreme Court voted yesterday to let stand a controversial Texas sentencing law that four justices said "unquestionably tips the scales" in favor of the death penalty in capital-punishment cases. The court's most liberal justices - John Paul Stevens, David H. Souter, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen G. Breyer - said they found the statute "especially troubling. " The law requires that juries be told in noncapital cases when a defendant will become eligible for parole. But Texas law prohibits juries from hearing the same information when the choice is a life sentence or death.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1986 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court announced yesterday that it would step into the huge- stakes struggle between Pennzoil Co. and Texaco Inc. The justices will rule, probably in 1987, whether Texas law can force Texaco to post a $12 billion bond while it appeals an $11.1 billion judgment obtained by Pennzoil in a Texas state court. And, in a decision that will save hundreds of millions of dollars a year for the federal government, the high court ruled 6-1 that the federal government can tax the group insurance plan operated by the tax-exempt American Bar Endowment.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
In a big win for abortion-rights advocates, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Texas abortion law that required clinics to meet hospital-like surgical standards and doctors to get admitting privileges at a local hospital. The 5-3 ruling was the most significant since Planned Parenthood v. Casey in 1992, which set the precedent that states could impose abortion restrictions as long as they did not create an "undue burden" on women seeking abortions. An undue burden existed if a restriction's "purpose or effect is to place substantial obstacles" in the path of women who want an abortion, including "unnecessary health regulations.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | E.J. Dionne
It's appropriate that our Fourth of July celebrations coincided with a moment when the Supreme Court's health-care decision prompted intense debate over the purpose of our government and what the Constitution allows it to do. We are a more philosophical people than we give ourselves credit for. Constitutional questions enter the political conversation here more than in most countries because our diverse nation is bound by our founding principles, not...
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Pete Yost, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A photo-ID requirement for voters in Texas could disenfranchise hundreds of thousands of registered Hispanics, the Justice Department declared Monday in its latest move against Republican-led voting changes in many states that have drawn protests from minorities, poor people, and students. The Justice objection means that now a federal court in Washington will decide whether Texas, as well as South Carolina, will be allowed to enforce its new voter photo-ID requirements.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
When Pennsylvania's Supreme Court convenes in Philadelphia Sept. 13 to consider whether the state's restrictive voter-ID law violates citizens' rights, the justices should have read the federal court decision blocking a similarly restrictive law in Texas. The decision serves as a guideline because the issues are analogous. Like Pennsylvania's legislators, Texas lawmakers passed a bill that would have required voters to show photo IDs, including a driver's license, passport, or government ID. But the three-judge federal appeals panel decided to toss the Texas law because it "imposes strict, unforgiving burdens on the poor and racial minorities.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Responding to a public outcry that already seems to have died down, the House yesterday approved a bill to ban mutilating, defacing, burning or trampling the American flag. Sponsors termed the legislation a less drastic response to a Supreme Court ruling striking down a Texas flag desecration law than amending the Constitution, an approach advocated by President Bush, leading veterans' groups and many Republican legislators. But advocates of a constitutional amendment will get their chance anyway.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 31, 2016 | By Mike Stack
Of all the votes I cast as a state senator, it might be the one I regret the most. I hope current members of the Pennsylvania Senate don't make the same mistake this year when they consider the oppressive, new abortion restrictions contained in House Bill 1948. In 2011, legislation came before the state Senate to place new requirements on abortion providers. In the wake of the Dr. Kermit Gosnell matter, the legislation was couched as an effort to protect women's health. Too late, I realized it was really an attack on lawful abortion providers and on women's rights.
NEWS
July 6, 2016
I SHARE the anguish expressed by Christine Flowers in her powerful op-ed on why she feels forced to vote for presidential candidate Donald Trump, whom she loathes. Her deepest concern is the possible Supreme Court justice the next president will nominate to replace late conservative Justice Antonin Scalia, and possibly others. Hillary Clinton has already expressed support for Planned Parenthood and hailed the "victory" of the recent SCOTUS decision striking down a Texas law that abortion clinics be hospital-ready for emergencies.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
In a big win for abortion-rights advocates, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Texas abortion law that required clinics to meet hospital-like surgical standards and doctors to get admitting privileges at a local hospital. The 5-3 ruling was the most significant since Planned Parenthood v. Casey in 1992, which set the precedent that states could impose abortion restrictions as long as they did not create an "undue burden" on women seeking abortions. An undue burden existed if a restriction's "purpose or effect is to place substantial obstacles" in the path of women who want an abortion, including "unnecessary health regulations.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
A national abortion rights group on Thursday criticized Philadelphia Media Network for refusing to publish a prominent digital ad on Philly.com. The National Partnership for Women and Families wanted to publicize its "Lies into Laws" campaign against restrictive state abortion laws with a one-day, $17,600 "home-page takeover" ad that would wrap around the top and both rails of Philly.com's landing page. The partnership declined the company's offer of an ad that would be randomly placed in a less prominent spot on the website, saying such an ad would have "reduced impact and visibility.
NEWS
March 3, 2016
By Denelle Weller I come from a family of health-care providers and was raised to do what I can to take care of the people around me. My grandmother was a nurse in Pennsylvania for more than 30 years, and now I have been a nurse in the same state for over a decade. As a nurse, I see individuals from all walks of life, which has shown me there is no one-size-fits-all solution to people's health-care needs. I've worked in several departments within my hospital, but no matter the setting, I've come to appreciate that people need the ability to make the choice that is right for them and their families.
NEWS
November 4, 2014
WHEN Scottish citizens went to the polls in September to vote for independence, nearly 85 percent of the voting population turned out. Last year's election in Philadelphia saw a turnout of 11 percent. You could say that the stakes were higher for Scotland, since it was voting to govern and rule itself, and last year's local election here had few big races. But that's hardly an excuse for our spotty track record - as Philadelphians and as Pennsylvanians - to exercise our rights as free citizens.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
MEXICO CITY - Eduardo Penaloza agrees with Gov. Christie's vision, expressed during a trade mission to Mexico last week, of a stronger relationship between the United States and its largest Latin American trading partner. What Penaloza - a former Mexican consulate official who heads a group promoting Mexican business initiatives in East Harlem - isn't sure of is Christie's stance on some of "the thorny politics" surrounding issues important to Hispanics, he said. Among them: immigration and driver's licenses for undocumented immigrants in New Jersey.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Could headline-grabbing scenarios like those in Texas and California involving brain-dead patients happen here? Yes, experts say. First, Texas: Marlise Munoz, 33, was found by her husband, Erick, at 2 a.m. Nov. 26 on their 2-year-old son's bedroom floor. Her heart had stopped for perhaps an hour after a pulmonary embolism. Her husband began CPR, called 911. She was 14 weeks pregnant. Her family stated from the beginning - only confirmed by the hospital last week - that Munoz was brain-dead.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Will Weissert, Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - Texas Gov. Rick Perry signed sweeping new abortion restrictions on Thursday that could shutter most of the state's clinics that provide the procedure, a final step for the Republican-backed measure after weeks of sometimes raucous protests at the state Capitol. Supporters credited God's will and prayer as the governor signed the legislation, with protesters' chants of "Shame! Shame! Shame!" echoing from the hallway. Opponents have vowed to fight the law, though no court challenges were immediately filed.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Angela K. Brown, Associated Press
HARROLD, Texas - In this tiny Texas town, children and their parents don't give much thought to safety at the community's lone school - mostly because some of the teachers are carrying concealed weapons. In remote Harrold, the nearest sheriff's office is 30 minutes away, and people tend to know - and trust - one another. So the school board voted to let teachers bring guns to school. "We don't have money for a security guard, but this is a better solution," Superintendent David Thweatt said.
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