CollectionsTexas Law
IN THE NEWS

Texas Law

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 27, 2003
The U.S. Supreme Court did something sensible, significant and overdue yesterday. In overturning a Texas law that criminalized gay sex, it affirmed what should have been obvious all along in a democracy with a Bill of Rights: The government should not bust down people's doors and arrest them for intimate acts of mutual consent. The court affirmed that, in a nation with a Bill of Rights, every citizen has a zone of privacy that government should not violate - except for a compelling national interest.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Could headline-grabbing scenarios like those in Texas and California involving brain-dead patients happen here? Yes, experts say. First, Texas: Marlise Munoz, 33, was found by her husband, Erick, at 2 a.m. Nov. 26 on their 2-year-old son's bedroom floor. Her heart had stopped for perhaps an hour after a pulmonary embolism. Her husband began CPR, called 911. She was 14 weeks pregnant. Her family stated from the beginning - only confirmed by the hospital last week - that Munoz was brain-dead.
NEWS
October 21, 1997 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Supreme Court voted yesterday to let stand a controversial Texas sentencing law that four justices said "unquestionably tips the scales" in favor of the death penalty in capital-punishment cases. The court's most liberal justices - John Paul Stevens, David H. Souter, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen G. Breyer - said they found the statute "especially troubling. " The law requires that juries be told in noncapital cases when a defendant will become eligible for parole. But Texas law prohibits juries from hearing the same information when the choice is a life sentence or death.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1986 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court announced yesterday that it would step into the huge- stakes struggle between Pennzoil Co. and Texaco Inc. The justices will rule, probably in 1987, whether Texas law can force Texaco to post a $12 billion bond while it appeals an $11.1 billion judgment obtained by Pennzoil in a Texas state court. And, in a decision that will save hundreds of millions of dollars a year for the federal government, the high court ruled 6-1 that the federal government can tax the group insurance plan operated by the tax-exempt American Bar Endowment.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Bruce Ackerman and Jennifer Nou
In 1964, the American people enacted the 24th Amendment to prevent the exclusion of the poor from the ballot box. In his recent speech at the NAACP convention, U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. wasn't indulging in election-year rhetoric when he condemned Texas' 2011 voter-identification law as a poll tax that could exclude the poor. He was speaking the hard legal truth. The Justice Department would be right to challenge this new law as an unconstitutional poll tax. The department has temporarily blocked the Texas law under special provisions of the Voting Rights Act that apply to jurisdictions, mostly in the South, with a history of discriminating against minority groups.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Pete Yost, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A photo-ID requirement for voters in Texas could disenfranchise hundreds of thousands of registered Hispanics, the Justice Department declared Monday in its latest move against Republican-led voting changes in many states that have drawn protests from minorities, poor people, and students. The Justice objection means that now a federal court in Washington will decide whether Texas, as well as South Carolina, will be allowed to enforce its new voter photo-ID requirements.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
When Pennsylvania's Supreme Court convenes in Philadelphia Sept. 13 to consider whether the state's restrictive voter-ID law violates citizens' rights, the justices should have read the federal court decision blocking a similarly restrictive law in Texas. The decision serves as a guideline because the issues are analogous. Like Pennsylvania's legislators, Texas lawmakers passed a bill that would have required voters to show photo IDs, including a driver's license, passport, or government ID. But the three-judge federal appeals panel decided to toss the Texas law because it "imposes strict, unforgiving burdens on the poor and racial minorities.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Responding to a public outcry that already seems to have died down, the House yesterday approved a bill to ban mutilating, defacing, burning or trampling the American flag. Sponsors termed the legislation a less drastic response to a Supreme Court ruling striking down a Texas flag desecration law than amending the Constitution, an approach advocated by President Bush, leading veterans' groups and many Republican legislators. But advocates of a constitutional amendment will get their chance anyway.
NEWS
December 13, 2002 | By BRENDAN I. KOERNER
THE U.S. SUPREME COURT has agreed to hear Lawrence vs. Texas, a challenge to the Texas law that criminalizes sodomy. So what exactly is sodomy? The exact definition varies from state to state, but sodomy has been broadly defined as a sexual "crime against nature" - a phrase echoed by then-Chief Justice Warren Burger in 1986, when the Supreme Court upheld a Georgia anti-sodomy law in Bowers vs. Hardwick. In the United States, that language dates back to a 1697 Massachusetts law that forbade "the detestable and abominable sin of buggery [anal sex]
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | By Chris Tomlinson, Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - A federal judge on Monday stopped Texas from preventing Planned Parenthood from getting funds through the state's Women's Health Program - a decision the state immediately appealed. U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel, sitting in Austin, ruled there is sufficient evidence that a law banning Planned Parenthood from the program is unconstitutional. He imposed an injunction against enforcing it until he could hear full arguments. Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott appealed Yeakel's decision to the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, asking that it remove the injunction.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 4, 2014
WHEN Scottish citizens went to the polls in September to vote for independence, nearly 85 percent of the voting population turned out. Last year's election in Philadelphia saw a turnout of 11 percent. You could say that the stakes were higher for Scotland, since it was voting to govern and rule itself, and last year's local election here had few big races. But that's hardly an excuse for our spotty track record - as Philadelphians and as Pennsylvanians - to exercise our rights as free citizens.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
MEXICO CITY - Eduardo Penaloza agrees with Gov. Christie's vision, expressed during a trade mission to Mexico last week, of a stronger relationship between the United States and its largest Latin American trading partner. What Penaloza - a former Mexican consulate official who heads a group promoting Mexican business initiatives in East Harlem - isn't sure of is Christie's stance on some of "the thorny politics" surrounding issues important to Hispanics, he said. Among them: immigration and driver's licenses for undocumented immigrants in New Jersey.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Could headline-grabbing scenarios like those in Texas and California involving brain-dead patients happen here? Yes, experts say. First, Texas: Marlise Munoz, 33, was found by her husband, Erick, at 2 a.m. Nov. 26 on their 2-year-old son's bedroom floor. Her heart had stopped for perhaps an hour after a pulmonary embolism. Her husband began CPR, called 911. She was 14 weeks pregnant. Her family stated from the beginning - only confirmed by the hospital last week - that Munoz was brain-dead.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Will Weissert, Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - Texas Gov. Rick Perry signed sweeping new abortion restrictions on Thursday that could shutter most of the state's clinics that provide the procedure, a final step for the Republican-backed measure after weeks of sometimes raucous protests at the state Capitol. Supporters credited God's will and prayer as the governor signed the legislation, with protesters' chants of "Shame! Shame! Shame!" echoing from the hallway. Opponents have vowed to fight the law, though no court challenges were immediately filed.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | Associated Press
HARROLD, Texas - In this tiny Texas town, children and their parents don't give much thought to safety at the community's lone school - mostly because some of the teachers are carrying concealed weapons. In remote Harrold, the nearest sheriff's office is 30 minutes away, and people tend to know - and trust - one another. So the school board voted to let teachers bring guns to school. "We don't have money for a security guard, but this is a better solution," Superintendent David Thweatt said.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Angela K. Brown, Associated Press
HARROLD, Texas - In this tiny Texas town, children and their parents don't give much thought to safety at the community's lone school - mostly because some of the teachers are carrying concealed weapons. In remote Harrold, the nearest sheriff's office is 30 minutes away, and people tend to know - and trust - one another. So the school board voted to let teachers bring guns to school. "We don't have money for a security guard, but this is a better solution," Superintendent David Thweatt said.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
When Pennsylvania's Supreme Court convenes in Philadelphia Sept. 13 to consider whether the state's restrictive voter-ID law violates citizens' rights, the justices should have read the federal court decision blocking a similarly restrictive law in Texas. The decision serves as a guideline because the issues are analogous. Like Pennsylvania's legislators, Texas lawmakers passed a bill that would have required voters to show photo IDs, including a driver's license, passport, or government ID. But the three-judge federal appeals panel decided to toss the Texas law because it "imposes strict, unforgiving burdens on the poor and racial minorities.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Will Weissert, Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - A tough Texas law requiring voters to show photo identification at the polls discriminates against low-income blacks and Hispanics, a federal court ruled Thursday, wiping out for the November election a measure championed by conservatives and setting up a potential U.S. Supreme Court showdown. In Washington, a three-judge panel unanimously ruled that the 2011 law places "strict, unforgiving burdens on the poor" and noted that Texas' racial minorities are more likely to live in poverty.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Bruce Ackerman and Jennifer Nou
In 1964, the American people enacted the 24th Amendment to prevent the exclusion of the poor from the ballot box. In his recent speech at the NAACP convention, U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. wasn't indulging in election-year rhetoric when he condemned Texas' 2011 voter-identification law as a poll tax that could exclude the poor. He was speaking the hard legal truth. The Justice Department would be right to challenge this new law as an unconstitutional poll tax. The department has temporarily blocked the Texas law under special provisions of the Voting Rights Act that apply to jurisdictions, mostly in the South, with a history of discriminating against minority groups.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | E.J. Dionne
It's appropriate that our Fourth of July celebrations coincided with a moment when the Supreme Court's health-care decision prompted intense debate over the purpose of our government and what the Constitution allows it to do. We are a more philosophical people than we give ourselves credit for. Constitutional questions enter the political conversation here more than in most countries because our diverse nation is bound by our founding principles, not...
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|