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NEWS
March 7, 2006
Cherry Hill school ballot asks a loaded question Cherry Hill property-tax payers will be given a false choice on the ballot regarding the school budget. We will see a public question that is packed like a cable-TV package. We will be forced to take good programming with bad, or reject a combination of good and bad. We will not get a list of specific options on a menu - the ballot - so we can make intelligent selections. If the school administration recommended separate items to the board, the board wouldn't have to pass this strange package on to the public.
NEWS
October 31, 2005 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When her daughter had to prepare for a mock courtroom debate on evolution versus creationism for a biology class, Lisa Bonfanti gave her the book Of Pandas and People to read. "It's a wonderful book," said Bonfanti, of Palmyra, Lebanon County, who homeschooled her two children. "It presents a strong argument for our world having been created in an orderly fashion. " Few people outside the homeschool community had ever heard of the book until last month. That is when the textbook took center stage at a landmark trial in Harrisburg scrutinizing the teaching of intelligent design in Dover, Pa., public schools.
NEWS
September 22, 2005 | By Steven Thomma INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Seeking to defuse a central controversy of the culture wars, a Bible advocacy group will unveil a new textbook today that could open the door to widespread Bible courses in public high schools. The textbook, The Bible and Its Influence, was written to thread a constitutional and legal needle by teaching, not preaching, about the Bible, its editors said. The book comes as the country renews its centuries-old debate over the proper role of religion in public life and public schools.
NEWS
September 13, 2005 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There were extra jumping ropes and hula hoops on the playground at Main Street School in Upland. And the new ninth graders at Chester High School were impressed by at least one bonus on the first day of school: free pizza, subs or anything else they might want for lunch. And, there was an abundance of textbooks - on the shelves, on desks and still in boxes in the schools of Chester Upland School District. "I've got plenty of books," confirmed Roland Gosselin, a social studies teacher at Main Street.
SPORTS
September 3, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Thirteen Ball State players, more than half of them projected starters, were suspended for today's season-opening game at No. 11 Iowa in a continuing investigation of NCAA violations. The university said yesterday that 43 athletes in six sports improperly used a book loan program to obtain textbooks not required for their own courses or received improperly obtained textbooks from other players. The violations were discovered last spring and were reported to the NCAA, which has not yet taken action.
NEWS
August 30, 2005 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Of all the costs included in a college education, the most galling for many students are those $100-plus price tags on so many of their textbooks. The near unanimous opinion of students interviewed is that the books are "a huge rip-off, a scam," as Temple University junior Stella Levin puts it. Textbooks and school supplies now cost undergraduates, on average, nearly $900 a year, and their price has gone up at more than twice the rate of inflation since 1986, according to a new report by the Government Accountability Office.
NEWS
August 26, 2005 | By Kera Ritter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
School is starting, and the only thing between a flush bank account and an empty one this semester is the stack of textbooks that your professors insist you need. You can blow off the books completely and hope to glean the information by osmosis, stand in line at the campus bookstore and pay full price while muttering about highway robbery, or go online. That last option can save hundreds of dollars and the headache of finding a retailer with the book in stock. Several online retailers carry textbooks.
NEWS
July 21, 2005 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Allison Dorsey's students are often surprised when they read The African-American Odyssey in her Swarthmore College history class. "It is not the Pilgrim story they know," said Dorsey, an associate professor at the college. "Usually their question in the first semester is: 'How come we don't know this? How come no one talked about this in high school?' " In Philadelphia, students soon will be talking about it, as a high school version of the textbook has been approved for the district's new African American history course.
NEWS
June 30, 2005 | By Michael Churchill
The Inquirer's June 21 editorial "What now, Harrisburg?" urging direct imposition of a modified Act 72 misses the mark by putting last things - limits on future tax increases - first. Pennsylvania Act 72, also known as the Homeowner Tax Relief Act of 2004, does nothing to fix our most pressing school funding problem, which is the inequality between districts in the education they can afford. Harrisburg politicians should reject Act 72 and start over again. To better understand the funding gap, let's compare the Reading School District with that of Tredyffrin-Easttown.
NEWS
October 5, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pop Lit America (The Book) By "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" 240 pp., $24.95 Not content with their nightly skewering of current events on Comedy Central, Jon Stewart and the other writers of The Daily Show have taken on a bigger target in America (The Book): lampooning all of U.S. history. Masquerading as a high school textbook (right down to the authentic "This Book is the Property of:" box stamped on the inside flap), America is the wildest civics lesson you'll ever get. It's full of hilariously apocryphal information, including the assertion that in 1978 President Jimmy Carter nominated NBA scoring machine George "The Iceman" Gervin to the Supreme Court in an "attempt to fundamentally alter the make-up of the Court by adding size, athleticism, and a patented 'finger roll' . . . Ultimately the vacancy was filled by Ruth 'Chocolate Thunder' Ginsberg.
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