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NEWS
August 26, 2005 | By Kera Ritter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
School is starting, and the only thing between a flush bank account and an empty one this semester is the stack of textbooks that your professors insist you need. You can blow off the books completely and hope to glean the information by osmosis, stand in line at the campus bookstore and pay full price while muttering about highway robbery, or go online. That last option can save hundreds of dollars and the headache of finding a retailer with the book in stock. Several online retailers carry textbooks.
NEWS
July 21, 2005 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Allison Dorsey's students are often surprised when they read The African-American Odyssey in her Swarthmore College history class. "It is not the Pilgrim story they know," said Dorsey, an associate professor at the college. "Usually their question in the first semester is: 'How come we don't know this? How come no one talked about this in high school?' " In Philadelphia, students soon will be talking about it, as a high school version of the textbook has been approved for the district's new African American history course.
NEWS
June 30, 2005 | By Michael Churchill
The Inquirer's June 21 editorial "What now, Harrisburg?" urging direct imposition of a modified Act 72 misses the mark by putting last things - limits on future tax increases - first. Pennsylvania Act 72, also known as the Homeowner Tax Relief Act of 2004, does nothing to fix our most pressing school funding problem, which is the inequality between districts in the education they can afford. Harrisburg politicians should reject Act 72 and start over again. To better understand the funding gap, let's compare the Reading School District with that of Tredyffrin-Easttown.
NEWS
October 5, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pop Lit America (The Book) By "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" 240 pp., $24.95 Not content with their nightly skewering of current events on Comedy Central, Jon Stewart and the other writers of The Daily Show have taken on a bigger target in America (The Book): lampooning all of U.S. history. Masquerading as a high school textbook (right down to the authentic "This Book is the Property of:" box stamped on the inside flap), America is the wildest civics lesson you'll ever get. It's full of hilariously apocryphal information, including the assertion that in 1978 President Jimmy Carter nominated NBA scoring machine George "The Iceman" Gervin to the Supreme Court in an "attempt to fundamentally alter the make-up of the Court by adding size, athleticism, and a patented 'finger roll' . . . Ultimately the vacancy was filled by Ruth 'Chocolate Thunder' Ginsberg.
NEWS
January 12, 2004
BOTH letter-writers Donna Sambrick and Frances D. Johnson are equally ignorant in characterizing certain physical features as white and "negroid. " Scholars long ago seized and burned all of the pseudo-scientific textbooks using that offensive term in relation to blacks. Contrary to popular, damaging stereotypes, there are no physical features that are exclusive to any ethnic group. I think most people would agree that Halle Berry is beautiful without dissecting which parts of her can be attributed to what parent.
NEWS
October 8, 2003 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An incident over the weekend in which some textbooks at an East Falls school were mistakenly placed in the trash has prompted the Philadelphia School District to issue a reminder to all schools on how to handle educational materials no longer in use. Many schools are cycling out old books after the district rolled out $18 million last month in new reading and math books and curriculums for kindergarten through grade nine. "We don't throw away books," Paul Vallas, district chief executive officer, said yesterday.
NEWS
September 22, 2003 | By Terri Akman
It wasn't until the diagnosis of my son's scoliosis, a lateral bending or curving of the spine, that I began to pay attention to the magnitude of the weight he had been hauling on his back all these years. Carrying his 26-pound school backpack was equivalent to playing piggyback with a toddler all day. For the record, Suken A. Shah, my son's pediatric orthopedic surgeon at the Alfred I. du Pont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, pointed out: "We haven't found any evidence that heavy backpacks cause scoliosis, but they can contribute to back pain.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2003 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Through a combination of vigilance, automation and luck, PJM Interconnection L.L.C. did the electrical equivalent of raising the drawbridge before last week's blackout could inflict damage on Philadelphia and points south. "For us on the engineering staff, this is a lifetime event," Robert O. Hinkel, general manager of integration and coordination for PJM, said in an interview yesterday. "This will be in textbooks. " U.S. Department of Energy investigators arrived at PJM yesterday to learn what its system experienced before the blackout hit. PJM, the electric-grid operator for all or parts of seven states and Washington, D.C., has its headquarters in a squat, two-story office-park building in Valley Forge obscured by trees and shrubbery.
NEWS
May 15, 2003 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia School District is preparing to increase its focus on African and African American history throughout its curriculum, including creating for-credit high school courses on those topics by September 2004. The courses, a first for the district in which two-thirds of the 200,000 students are African American, would be optional for students. District officials said African history - as well as the history of Latinos, Asians and other groups - would be included in the curriculum as never before.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2003 | By Ken Moritsugu INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush's soon-to-be chief economist may miss the civility of the ivory tower. Democrats berated Harvard University professor Gregory Mankiw with tough questions at his nomination hearing yesterday, using passages from his own economics textbook to attack Bush's proposed tax cut. "I guess your textbook is going to have to be extensively revised," said Sen. Paul Sarbanes of Maryland, the senior Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee, which...
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