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Textile Mill

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REAL_ESTATE
May 6, 1990 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine that 100 years from now a developer restores the Great Valley Corporate Center in Malvern as a monument to the office economy of the late 20th century. The developer of Great Valley, Rouse & Associates, is doing something much like that, preserving a 19th-century Philadelphia textile mill as a luxury apartment complex called Chelsea. The $65 million development is being built on the 13-acre site of the former Dobson Carpet Mill on Ridge Avenue, just east of the Twin Bridges in East Falls.
NEWS
August 24, 2001 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
Canal House, an upscale rental abode in Manayunk, could be considered one of the more unusual creations to come out of the 19th-century Blantyre textile mill. From the vintage mill's four gutted stone-and-brick buildings, Brandywine Construction & Management Co. spun 71 apartments, commercial space, and LeBus restaurant, weaving a contemporary complex of residential and commercial space into the fabric of the gentrified area. Beyond secured iron gates fronting Main Street, at the bottom of a full flight of stairs, a brick-paved, landscaped courtyard with a bubbling fountain creates a serene, inviting ambience.
NEWS
April 21, 2006 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than 30 years, Joanne Hulme worked as an event designer, creating elaborate settings for weddings and bar mitzvahs. With the business dependent on the economy and the seasons, she often found herself struggling to keep up with the rent and utility bills for her loft in the Northeast. All the while, what she really longed for was the time to teach design, write, and explore other art forms, from painting to glassblowing. "Then I hit my 50s and I thought, 'If not now, when?
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Employees of the Joseph Titone & Sons textile mill returned to work yesterday to begin cleaning up after a Sunday night fire there destroyed $1.5 million in machinery and merchandise. They could have stayed in bed. A second fire, started in a part of the mill not damaged in the first, was smoldering as employees arrived about 7 a.m. Fire officials are calling both fires arson. There were no injuries in either. The first fire was reported Sunday about 11 p.m. by a resident living near the mill, which is at the intersection of Jacksonville and Oxmead Roads.
NEWS
July 11, 2010 | By Barbara Boyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A two-alarm fire at a company that manufactures waxes and specialty oils burned for more than five hours Sunday in Bridgeport. Flames at C.J. Robinson Co. in the Continental Business Complex in Montgomery County were reported at 2:44 p.m. Sunday, with black smoke billowing for hours as at least 11 fire companies responded. One firefighter was treated for chest pains, but authorities said it did not appear life-threatening. No other injuries were reported. The fire's cause remained under investigation Sunday night.
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | By Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
The owners of a textile mill in Rockledge who want to convert the building to condominium apartments are appealing a decision by the borough's Zoning Hearing Board rejecting the proposal. Rockledge Council President Joe Costello said the borough had been served with the appeal at the council's work session Monday night. The matter is in the hands of Montgomery County Court. . The developers, known as the Mill of Rockledge Associates, seek to convert a three-story mill on a 0.74-acre tract at 27 Jarrett Ave. into condominium apartments.
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | By Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
The Rockledge Zoning Hearing Board has refused to grant requests for 12 variances from its zoning code for a proposed condominium development in the borough. The vote was unanimous, 3-0. The Mill of Rockledge Associates petitioned the board Wednesday night for special exceptions that would allow the conversion of the former Infanta textile mill into 42 one- and two-bedroom condominiums. Under the zoning code, which was formulated in 1976, the area is zoned for single-family residences.
NEWS
July 10, 1993 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the last and largest mementos of Philadelphia's glory days as a textile center will become history Tuesday, when much of the equipment, furnishings and machinery of the Quaker Lace Co. will be auctioned off at the company's huge mill in North Philadelphia. Of almost equal interest, however, are the components of the plant that will not be sold: the structure itself at Fourth Street and Lehigh Avenue and most of the dozens of looms, on which lace could be woven in sizes ranging from a doily to more than 40 feet wide.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | by Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
Alfred S. Miller, who, along with his brothers, operated the Franklinshire Worsted Mill and Westmoreland Mill, at 3rd Street and Allegheny Avenue, for almost 50 years, died Monday. He was 88 and lived in Bala Cynwyd. Miller was born in Philadelphia and attended Central High School. He began working part time at his father's textile mill when he was 15. Miller attended the University of Pennsylvania and Temple University. He later enrolled in the night school of the Philadelphia Textile Institute and obtained a degree in textiles.
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NEWS
July 11, 2010 | By Barbara Boyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A two-alarm fire at a company that manufactures waxes and specialty oils burned for more than five hours Sunday in Bridgeport. Flames at C.J. Robinson Co. in the Continental Business Complex in Montgomery County were reported at 2:44 p.m. Sunday, with black smoke billowing for hours as at least 11 fire companies responded. One firefighter was treated for chest pains, but authorities said it did not appear life-threatening. No other injuries were reported. The fire's cause remained under investigation Sunday night.
NEWS
October 6, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeanine Burgin's back started to itch in April. Then came red patches, blisters and a burning sensation. Skin-care products only seemed to make things worse. She was in and out of hospitals, where doctors tried cortisone and other treatments - all to no avail. "It was a mystery," says Burgin, 69, who lives outside Paris. Turns out the mystery was right inside her house: her new upholstered armchair. To the litany of tainted products from overseas - milk powder, toothpaste, dog food and toys - now add textiles.
NEWS
May 31, 2007 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
In a particularly hilarious episode of South Park, the popular animated comedy on cable TV that follows the lives of four raunchy fourth graders in a small town in Colorado, the boys are saddled with a history project about the Declaration of Independence. Eric Cartman, not wanting to do the reading, tries to knock himself into a colonial-era flashback, which he eventually achieves, by electrocuting himself in a tub along with a TiVo full of History Channel documentaries. Cartman's flashback works, and when he eventually wakes up from his coma, his knowledge of the Founding Fathers is impeccable.
NEWS
April 21, 2006 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than 30 years, Joanne Hulme worked as an event designer, creating elaborate settings for weddings and bar mitzvahs. With the business dependent on the economy and the seasons, she often found herself struggling to keep up with the rent and utility bills for her loft in the Northeast. All the while, what she really longed for was the time to teach design, write, and explore other art forms, from painting to glassblowing. "Then I hit my 50s and I thought, 'If not now, when?
NEWS
August 21, 2005 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They started in Old City, got pushed out of Northern Liberties, and now are migrating to "Port Fishington" - a wedge of neighborhoods that takes in parts of Port Richmond, Fishtown and Kensington. They are artists in constant pursuit of cheap space, and lots of it. Slowly but steadily, a mix of painters, metal-workers, glass-blowers, sculptors, musicians and photographers is putting down roots on either side of Frankford Avenue, above Girard Avenue and below Lehigh Avenue.
NEWS
August 24, 2001 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
Canal House, an upscale rental abode in Manayunk, could be considered one of the more unusual creations to come out of the 19th-century Blantyre textile mill. From the vintage mill's four gutted stone-and-brick buildings, Brandywine Construction & Management Co. spun 71 apartments, commercial space, and LeBus restaurant, weaving a contemporary complex of residential and commercial space into the fabric of the gentrified area. Beyond secured iron gates fronting Main Street, at the bottom of a full flight of stairs, a brick-paved, landscaped courtyard with a bubbling fountain creates a serene, inviting ambience.
NEWS
July 25, 2001 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a fire burned through the night at the Continental Business Center, officials worried that a majority of the businesses there had been lost. Two months after the fire, a clearer picture of the damage to the East Front Street complex, and the borough's economy, has emerged, and officials say the news is not as bad as they once feared it would be. In the end, 15 companies, employing 103 people, were destroyed on May 15 and 16. That is well below early estimates that 50 of the 55 businesses there, employing many hundreds of people, were gone.
NEWS
July 18, 2001 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 13 years, Congregation Mishkan Shalom has lived a nomadic existence, its only real home a radical, activist vision of "repairing the world. " Without stained-glass windows or bronze Torah doors or a Marc Chagall mural in the lobby to call its own, Mishkan Shalom has defined itself by defending the rights of Palestinians, by welcoming gays and lesbians, with prayers invoking female imagery of the divine, and in other ways that sometimes put...
NEWS
August 22, 2000 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A memorial service will be held Sept. 8 for Louis W. Scott 3d, 70, of Upper Providence, a popular former principal of Penncrest High School. He died of cancer Aug. 13 at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. The service will be at 11 a.m. at Lima United Methodist Church, North Pennell Road, Middletown. Burial was private. Mr. Scott was principal at Penncrest for 30 years before retiring in 1989. For the last 11 years, he had been a special assistant to the president of Delaware County Community College and an education consultant for the Weather Channel.
REAL_ESTATE
January 18, 1998 | By Don Beideman, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Mills at Rose Valley, Nether Providence, Delaware County For more than 200 years, this 52-acre site off Brookhaven Road in Nether Providence was a home for mills - first a snuff mill owned by a colonial tobacconist, then a textile mill. The textile mill buildings, which were the center of a small community known as Sackville, produced blankets in the 19th century and put together linings for top coats well into the early 1990s. They are no more. Age caught up with some of them in the 1940s, and they were razed.
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